Mass stipend

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In the Catholic Church, a Mass stipend is a donation given by the laity to a priest for praying a Mass. Despite the name, it is considered as a gift or offering (Latin : stips) freely given rather than a payment (Latin : stipendium) as such. [1]

This is usually a small amount of money determined at the discretion of the family, community or individual in question, and may vary depending on the occasion and number of attendees. As it is considered simony for priests to request payment for a sacrament, the donors decide upon the form and amount of stipend, and are received as gifts. [2] [3]

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References

  1. Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Stipend"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. Cathy Caridi, J.C.L. "Mass Intentions and Stipends". Catholic Exchange. Retrieved 2013-08-07.
  3. "lms.org.uk, A Guide to ensuring you have the Traditional Mass at your Funeral, The Latin Mass Society, Page 24 and 25". Archived from the original on 2014-04-07. Retrieved 2016-08-29.