Rite of Braga

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The Rite of Braga (or Bragan Rite) is a Catholic liturgical rite associated with the Archdiocese of Braga in Portugal.

Catholic Church Christian church led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's oldest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome in Italy.

Latin liturgical rites category of Catholic rites

Latin liturgical rites, or Western liturgical rites, are Latin tradition Catholic liturgical rites employed by the Latin Church, the largest particular church sui iuris of the Catholic Church, that originated in Europe where the Latin language once dominated. Its language is now known as Ecclesiastical Latin. The most used rite is the Roman Rite.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Braga Roman Catholic archdiocese in Portugal

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Braga is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church in Portugal.

Contents

History

The Rite of Braga belongs to the Roman family of liturgical rites and took shape within the Archdiocese of Braga between the 11th and 13th centuries. [1] The Missal of Mateus, which dates to the second quarter of the twelfth century, is the oldest known source for this Rite. [2] It was more than 200 years old at the time of Pope Pius V's papal bulls Quod a nobis of 9 July 1568 and Quo primum of 14 July 1570. The rite was unaffected by the imposition of the Roman Rite throughout the Latin Church. This was due to the exception made for regions where another rite had been in use for at least two centuries. However, the Roman Rite was increasingly adopted within the archdiocese and non-traditional elements were admitted into celebrations of the archdiocese's rite. [1]

Roman Rite most common rite practiced in the Latin Catholic Church

The Roman Rite is the main Latin liturgical rite of the Latin Church, the main particular church sui iuris of the Catholic Church. Roman Rite is the most widespread liturgical rite in the Latin Church, and by virtue of its size also in the Catholic Church, in Western Christianity, and in Christianity as a whole. The Roman Rite gradually became the predominant rite used by the Latin Church, also known as the Western Church, developed out of many local variants from Early Christianity on, not amounting to distinctive rites, that existed in the medieval manuscripts, but have been progressively reduced since the invention of printing, most notably since the reform of liturgical law in the 16th century at the behest of the Council of Trent (1545–63) and more recently following the Second Vatican Council (1962–65).

Pope Pius V 16th-century Catholic pope

Pope Pius V, born Antonio Ghislieri, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 8 January 1566 to his death in 1572. He is venerated as a saint of the Catholic Church. He is chiefly notable for his role in the Council of Trent, the Counter-Reformation, and the standardization of the Roman rite within the Latin Church. Pius V declared Thomas Aquinas a Doctor of the Church.

Papal bull type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church

A papal bull is a type of public decree, letters patent, or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church. It is named after the leaden seal (bulla) that was traditionally appended to the end in order to authenticate it.

In the 20th century an attempt was made by Archbishop Manuel Vieira de Matos, with the approval of Pope Pius XI, to expunge these accretions, to revise the texts and to make the rite obligatory within the archdiocese. [3] [4] After the Second Vatican Council the priests of the archdiocese, while authorized to use the Rite of Braga, have in general opted to use the Roman Rite. [5]

Manuel Vieira de Matos Catholic bishop

Manuel Vieira de Matos was Bishop of Guarda, Archbishop of Braga, and the founder of the Corpo Nacional de Escutas - Escutismo Católico Português.

Pope Pius XI 20th-century Catholic pope

Pope Pius XI, born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, was head of the Catholic Church from 6 February 1922 to his death in 1939. He was the first sovereign of Vatican City from its creation as an independent state on 11 February 1929. He took as his papal motto, "Pax Christi in Regno Christi," translated "The Peace of Christ in the Kingdom of Christ."

Second Vatican Council Roman Catholic ecumenical council held in Vatican City from 1962 to 1965

The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, commonly known as the Second Vatican Council or Vatican II, addressed relations between the Catholic Church and the modern world. The council, through the Holy See, was formally opened under the pontificate of Pope John XXIII on 11 October 1962 and was closed under Pope Paul VI on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception on 8 December 1965.

Rite

A peculiarity of the Rite of Braga is the recitation of the Ave Maria at the start of Mass and of the Sub tuum praesidium at the end. [6]

Sub tuum praesidium

"Beneath Thy Protection" is a Christian hymn. It is the oldest preserved extant hymn to the Blessed Virgin Mary as Theotokos. The hymn is well known in many Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox countries, and is often a favourite song used along with Salve Regina.

In a talk on 24 October 1998, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger cited the Rite of Braga as one of the liturgical rites whose variety within the Latin Church demonstrated that unity does not require liturgical uniformity. [7]

Pope Benedict XVI 265th Pope of the Catholic Church

Pope Benedict XVI, also known as the Pope emeritus, is a retired senior prelate of the Catholic Church who served as head of the Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013. Benedict's election as pope occurred in the 2005 papal conclave that followed the death of Pope John Paul II. Benedict chose to be known by the title "Pope Emeritus" upon his resignation.

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References

  1. 1 2 Reid, Alcuin (2005). The Organic Development of the Liturgy (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Ignatius Press. p. 128. ISBN   1-58617-106-2.
  2. Missal De Mateus, (Lisbon: Fundação Calouste Gulbenkain, 1975), x and xvi.
  3. Reid (2005), p. 129
  4. Bunson, Matthew (2004). Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Catholic History (Revised ed.). Huntington, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Publishing. p. 160. ISBN   9781592760268.
  5. Tribe, Shawn (5 October 2010). "Rádio Renascença: Fr. Joseph Santos and the Rite of Braga". New Liturgical Movement. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  6. Mullett, Michael A (1999). The Catholic Reformation. Routledge. p. 184. ISBN   9780415189156.
  7. Address on 24 October 1998 for the tenth anniversary of the motu proprio Ecclesia Dei