Missa sicca

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The Missa sicca (Latin  for 'dry Mass') was a form of Catholic devotion used in the medieval Catholic Church when a full Mass could not be said, such as for funerals or marriages which were served in the afternoon after a priest had already said Mass earlier that morning. It consisted of all components the Mass except the Offertory, Consecration and Communion.(Durandus, "Rationale", IV, i, 23)

Catholic Church Christian church led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's "oldest continuously functioning international institution", it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome in Italy.

Mass (liturgy) type of worship service within many Christian denomination

Mass is the main eucharistic liturgical service in many forms of Western Christianity. The term Mass is commonly used in the Catholic Church and Anglican churches, as well as some Lutheran churches, Methodist, Western Rite Orthodox and Old Catholic churches.

Offertory

The offertory is the part of a Eucharistic service when the bread and wine for use in the service are ceremonially placed on the altar.

Specific types of Missa sicca included Missa nautica, said at sea in rough weather, and Missa venatoria, said for hunters in a hurry. In some monasteries each priest was also obliged to say a dry Mass after the conventual Mass.

Monastery complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplace(s) of monks or nuns

A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory.

Priest person authorized to lead the sacred rituals of a religion (for a minister use Q1423891)

A priest or priestess is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities. Their office or position is the priesthood, a term which also may apply to such persons collectively.

Cardinal Giovanni Bona (Rerum liturg. libr. duo, I, xv) argued against the practice of saying dry Masses. Following the reform of Pope Pius V it gradually disappeared.

Giovanni Bona Catholic cardinal

Giovanni Bona (1609–1674) was an Italian Cistercian, cardinal, liturgist and devotional author.

Pope Pius V 16th-century Catholic pope

Pope Pius V, born Antonio Ghislieri, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 8 January 1566 to his death in 1572. He is venerated as a saint of the Catholic Church. He is chiefly notable for his role in the Council of Trent, the Counter-Reformation, and the standardization of the Roman rite within the Latin Church. Pius V declared Thomas Aquinas a Doctor of the Church.

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The Tridentine Mass, also known as the Traditional Latin Mass, Usus Antiquior or Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, is the Roman Rite Mass which appears in typical editions of the Roman Missal published from 1570 to 1962. The most widely used Mass liturgy in the world until the introduction of the Mass of Paul VI in 1969, it is celebrated in ecclesiastical Latin. The 1962 edition is the most recent authorized text, also known as the Missal of Saint John XXIII after the now canonized Pope who promulgated it.

Requiem mass celebrated for the repose of the soul or souls of one or more deceased persons.

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Low Mass is a Tridentine Mass defined officially in the Code of Rubrics included in the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal as Mass in which the priest does not chant the parts that the rubrics assign to him. A sung Mass in turn is a Solemn or High Mass if celebrated with the assistance of sacred ministers ; without them it is a Missa Cantata.

Lavabo device to provide water for the washing of hands, often for ecclesiastical use

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A Dialogue Mass is a Low Mass in which the people recite some parts of the Latin Tridentine Mass.

Roman Rite most common rite practiced in the Latin Catholic Church

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Solemn Mass

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Ite, missa est

Ite, missa est are the concluding Latin words addressed to the people in the Mass of the Roman Rite, as well as the Lutheran Divine Service. Until the reforms of 1962, at Masses without the Gloria, Benedicamus Domino was said instead. The response of the people is Deo gratias.

Benedicamus Domino is a closing salutation that was formerly used in the Roman Mass instead of the Ite, missa est in Masses which lack the Gloria. The response, said afterwards, is Deo gratias. It is also sung as a versicle at the end of all Offices.

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Manuterge is the name given by the Roman Catholic Church to the towel used by the priest when engaged liturgically.

Missa pro populo is a term used in liturgical texts and rules of the Catholic Church. It refers to the requirement of all ordained pastors to say Mass for the people of their parish. This is as opposed to a Mass said for a particular person, for the benefit of the celebrant alone, or for the benefit of the dead. This requirement is often linked to the term parochial Mass, referring to the Mass said in the parochial or parish church.

Mass of the Presanctified Catholic and Anglican liturgy traditionally celebrated on Good Friday

The Mass of the Presanctified is Christian liturgy traditionally celebrated on Good Friday in which the consecration is not performed. Instead, the Blessed Sacrament that was consecrated at an earlier Mass and reserved is distributed.

In the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church, a votive Mass is a Mass offered for a votum, a special intention.

Order of Mass is an outline of a Mass celebration, describing how and in what order liturgical texts and rituals are employed to constitute a Mass.

A Missa bifaciata or Missa trifaciata was a type of Mass wherein the priest would pray the texts of the Mass of the Catechumens multiple times.

References

    PD-icon.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton., s.v. Missa Sicca Sec. D, ¶ 6.

    The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

    <i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

    The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".