Pope Stephen VII

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Pope

Stephen VII
Stephen VII.jpg
Papacy beganFebruary 929
Papacy ended15 March 931
Predecessor Leo VI
Successor John XI
Created cardinalby Leo VI
Personal details
Birth nameStephanus de Gabrielli
Born Rome, Papal States
Diedc. 15 March 931
Rome, Papal States
Previous post Cardinal-Priest of Sant'Anastasia (928-929)
Other popes named Stephen

Pope Stephen VII (Latin : Stephanus VII; died 15 March 931) [1] was pope from February 929 to his death in 931. A candidate of the infamous Marozia, his pontificate occurred during the period known as the Saeculum obscurum.

Biography

Stephen was a Roman [2] by birth, the son of Theodemundus. [3] He was elected—probably handpicked—by Marozia from the Tusculani family, as a stop-gap measure until her own son John was ready to assume the chair of Saint Peter. Prior to his election, Stephen had been the cardinal-priest of St Anastasia in Rome. [3]

Very little is known about Stephen's pontificate. During his two years as pope, Stephen confirmed the privileges of a few religious houses in France and Italy. [3] As a reward for helping free Stephen from the oppression of Hugh of Arles, Stephen granted Cante di Gabrielli the position of papal governor of Gubbio, and control over a number of key fortresses. [4] Stephen was also noted for the severity with which he treated clergy who strayed in their morals. [5] He was also, apparently, according to a hostile Greek source from the twelfth century, the first pope who went around clean shaved whilst pope. [6]

Stephen died around 15 March 931, and was succeeded by Pope John XI.

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Guy was the son of Adalbert II of Tuscany with Bertha, daughter of Lothair II of Lotharingia.

References

  1. Archibald Bower, The History of the Popes: from the foundation of the See of Rome to A.D. 1758 (1845), pg. 311
  2. Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., pp. 247–248, retrieved 2013-04-25
  3. 1 2 3 Mann, pg. 189
  4. Collegio araldico, Rivista, Volume 5 (1907), pg. 49
  5. DeCormenin, Louis Marie; Gihon, James L., A Complete History of the Popes of Rome, from Saint Peter, the First Bishop to Pius the Ninth (1857), pg. 287
  6. Mann, pg. 190
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Leo VI
Pope
928–931
Succeeded by
John XI