Pope Marinus II

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Pope

Marinus II
Papacy began30 October 942
Papacy endedMay 946
Predecessor Stephen VIII
Successor Agapetus II
Personal details
Birth nameMarinus
Born Rome, Papal States
DiedMay 946 (aged 46)
Rome, Papal States
Previous postCardinal-Priest of San Ciriaco alle Terne
Other popes named Marinus

Pope Marinus II (died May 946) was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 30 October 942 to his death. He has also been mistakenly called Martinus. He ruled during the Saeculum obscurum .

Contents

Early career

Marinus was born in Rome, and prior to becoming pope he was attached to the Church of Saint Cyriacus in the Baths of Diocletian. He was said to have encountered Ulrich of Augsburg on his visit to Rome in 909, and reportedly predicted Ulrich's eventual appointment as bishop of Augsburg. [1]

Pontificate

Marinus was elevated to the papacy on 30 October 942 through intervention of Alberic II of Spoleto. This period is known as Saeculum obscurum due to the power of Alberic and his relatives over the popes. Marinus concentrated on administrative aspects of the papacy, and sought to reform both the secular and regular clergy. He extended the appointment of Archbishop Frederick of Mainz as papal vicar and missus dominicus throughout Germany and Francia. [2] Marinus later intervened when the bishop of Capua seized without authorization a church which had been given to the local Benedictine monks. [3] In fact, throughout his pontificate, Marinus favoured various monasteries, issuing a number of bulls in their favour. [4]

Marinus occupied the palace built by Pope John VII atop the Palatine Hill in the ruins of the Domus Gaiana. [5] He died in May 946 and was succeeded by Agapetus II. [6]

Name

Because of the similarity of the names Marinus and Martinus, Marinus I and Marinus II were, in some sources, mistakenly called Martinus II and Martinus III.

Notes

  1. Mann, pgs. 218-219
  2. Mann, pg. 219
  3. DeCormenin, Louis Marie; Gihon, James L., A Complete History of the Popes of Rome, from Saint Peter, the First Bishop to Pius the Ninth (1857), pgs. 290-291
  4. Mann, pg. 221
  5. Mann, pg. 222
  6. Mann, pg. 223

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Stephen VIII
Pope
942–946
Succeeded by
Agapetus II