1212

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1212 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1212
MCCXII
Ab urbe condita 1965
Armenian calendar 661
ԹՎ ՈԿԱ
Assyrian calendar 5962
Balinese saka calendar 1133–1134
Bengali calendar 619
Berber calendar 2162
English Regnal year 13  Joh. 1   14  Joh. 1
Buddhist calendar 1756
Burmese calendar 574
Byzantine calendar 6720–6721
Chinese calendar 辛未(Metal  Goat)
3908 or 3848
     to 
壬申年 (Water  Monkey)
3909 or 3849
Coptic calendar 928–929
Discordian calendar 2378
Ethiopian calendar 1204–1205
Hebrew calendar 4972–4973
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1268–1269
 - Shaka Samvat 1133–1134
 - Kali Yuga 4312–4313
Holocene calendar 11212
Igbo calendar 212–213
Iranian calendar 590–591
Islamic calendar 608–609
Japanese calendar Kenryaku 2
(建暦2年)
Javanese calendar 1120–1121
Julian calendar 1212
MCCXII
Korean calendar 3545
Minguo calendar 700 before ROC
民前700年
Nanakshahi calendar −256
Thai solar calendar 1754–1755
Tibetan calendar 阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1338 or 957 or 185
     to 
阳水猴年
(male Water-Monkey)
1339 or 958 or 186

Year 1212 ( MCCXII ) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG, such as the years 1888, 1928, 1956, 1984, 2012, 2040, 2068, 2096, 2108, 2136, 2164, and 2192 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC), by edict. It was designed with the aid of Greek mathematicians and Greek astronomers such as Sosigenes of Alexandria.

Contents

Events

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 174 days remain until the end of the year.

In common with all old cities, London has experienced numerous serious fires in the course of its history.

July 16 is the 197th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 168 days remain until the end of the year.

Bergen op Zoom Municipality in North Brabant, Netherlands

Bergen op Zoom is a municipality and a city located in the south of the Netherlands.

Argos Place in Greece

Argos is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece and is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. It is the largest city in Argolis and a major center for the area.

Fourth Crusade 1204 Crusade that captured Constantinople rather than Jerusalem

The Fourth Crusade (1202–1204) was a Latin Christian armed expedition called by Pope Innocent III. The stated intent of the expedition was to recapture the Muslim-controlled city of Jerusalem, by first conquering the powerful Egyptian Ayyubid Sultanate, the strongest Muslim state of the time. However, a sequence of economic and political events culminated in the Crusader army sacking the city of Constantinople, the capital of the Greek Christian-controlled Byzantine Empire, rather than Egypt as originally planned.

Births

Emperor Go-Horikawa Emperor Go-Horikawa.jpg
Emperor Go-Horikawa

March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 284 days remain until the end of the year.

Emperor Go-Horikawa Emperor of Japan

Emperor Go-Horikawa was the 86th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1221 CE through 1232 CE.

1234 Year

Year 1234 (MCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

February 29, also known as leap day or leap year day, is a date added to most years that are divisible by 4, such as 2016, 2020, and 2024. A leap day is added in various solar calendars, including the Gregorian calendar standard in most of the world. Lunisolar calendars instead add a leap or intercalary month.

Hōnen Japanese Buddhist monk

Hōnen was the religious reformer and founder of the first independent branch of Japanese Pure Land Buddhism called Jōdo-shū. He is also considered the Seventh Jōdo Shinshū Patriarch.

Year 1133 (MCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

Year 1135 (MCXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1123 (MCXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1114 (MCXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1116 (MCXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1101 Year

Year 1101 (MCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. It was the 2nd year of the 1100s decade, and the 1st year of the 12th century.

Year 1153 (MCLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1210s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1210, and ended on December 31, 1219.

Year 1418 (MCDXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1217 (MCCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1102 Year

Year 1102 (MCII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1108 Year

Year 1108 (MCVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1243 (MCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1244 (MCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1245 (MCCXLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1264 Year

Year 1264 (MCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Alfonso VIII, called the Noble or the one of the Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo. He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate. After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads in 1195, he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of a tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula.

Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa Battle happened in 1212 between the Christian armies of the Iberian peninsula and the Muslim armies of the Almohad Empire

The Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, known in Arab history as the Battle of Al-Uqab, took place on 16 July 1212 and was an important turning point in the Reconquista and in the medieval history of Spain. The Christian forces of King Alfonso VIII of Castile were joined by the armies of his rivals, Sancho VII of Navarre, Peter II of Aragon and Afonso II of Portugal, in battle against the Almohad Muslim rulers of the southern half of the Iberian Peninsula. The Caliph al-Nasir led the Almohad army, made up of people from the whole Almohad empire. Most of the men in the Almohad army came from the African side of the empire.

Walter VI, Count of Brienne Count of Brienne

Walter VI was Count of Brienne, Conversano, and Lecce, and titular Duke of Athens as Walter II.

In medieval Iberia, an alférez or alferes was a high-ranking official in the household of a king or magnate. The term is derived from the Arabic الفارس (al-fāris), meaning "horseman" or "cavalier", and it was commonly Latinised as alferiz or alferis, although it was also translated into Latin as armiger or armentarius, meaning "armour-bearer". The connexion with arms-bearing is visible in several Latin synonyms: fertorarius, inferartis, and offertor. The office was sometimes the same as that of the standard-bearer or signifer. The alférez was generally the next highest-ranking official after the majordomo. He was generally in charge of the king or magnate's mesnada, his personal retinue of knights, and perhaps also of his armoury and his guard. He generally followed his lord on campaign and into battle.

References

  1. "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p26
  2. Linehan, Peter (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In David Abulafia (ed.). The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–671. ISBN   0-521-36289-X.
  3. Bridge, Antony (1980). The Crusades . London: Granada Publishing. ISBN   0-531-09872-9.
  4. Warren, W. L. (1961). King John. Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 169–172.