Ray Lewis

Last updated

Ray Lewis
Ray-Lewis-2008-Steelers-regseason-game.jpg
Lewis with the Baltimore Ravens in 2008
No. 52
Position: Middle linebacker
Personal information
Born: (1975-05-15) May 15, 1975 (age 44)
Bartow, Florida
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:240 lb (109 kg)
Career information
High school: Kathleen (Lakeland, Florida)
College: Miami (FL)
NFL Draft: 1996  / Round: 1 / Pick: 26
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Tackles:2,061
Quarterback sacks:41.5
Pass deflections:67
Interceptions:31
Forced fumbles:17
Fumble Recoveries:20
Defensive Touchdowns:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Raymond Anthony Lewis Jr. (born May 15, 1975) is a former American football linebacker who played all of his 17-year professional career for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He previously played college football for the University of Miami, and earned All-America honors. Lewis was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and upon his retirement following the 2012 season, was the last remaining active player from the team's inaugural season.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Linebacker defensive position in American football

A linebacker is a playing position in American football and Canadian football. Linebackers are members of the defensive team, and line up approximately three to five yards behind the line of scrimmage, behind the defensive linemen, and therefore "back up the line". Linebackers generally align themselves before the ball is snapped by standing upright in a "two-point stance".

Baltimore Ravens National Football League franchise in Baltimore, Maryland

The Baltimore Ravens are a professional American football team based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Ravens compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) North division. The team plays its home games at M&T Bank Stadium and is headquartered in Owings Mills.

Contents

Lewis played middle linebacker his entire career, and is considered to be one of the greatest ever to play the position. He was a 13-time Pro Bowler, a 10-time All-Pro, and one of the few players in NFL history to play in a Pro Bowl in three different decades (1990s, 2000s, and 2010s). He is also considered to be the greatest Baltimore Raven of all-time. [1]

Pro Bowl all-star game of the National Football League (NFL)

The Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). From the merger with the rival American Football League (AFL) in 1970 up through 2013 and since 2017, it is officially called the AFC–NFC Pro Bowl, matching the top players in the American Football Conference (AFC) against those in the National Football Conference (NFC). From 2014 through 2016, the NFL experimented with an unconferenced format, where the teams were selected by two honorary team captains, instead of selecting players from each conference. The players were picked in a televised "schoolyard pick" prior to the game.

All-Pro is an honor bestowed upon professional American football players that designates the best player at each position during a given season. All-Pro players are typically selected by press organizations, who select an "All-Pro team," a list that consists of at least 22 players, one for each offensive and defensive position, plus various special teams players depending on the press organization that compiles the list. All-Pro lists are exclusively limited to the major leagues, usually only the National Football League; in the past, other leagues recognized as major, such as the American Football League of the 1960s or the All-America Football Conference of the 1940s, have been included in All-Pro lists.

Lewis pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in connection with the stabbing deaths of two men in 2000. The following season, he won the NFL Defensive Player of the Year and led the Ravens' record-setting defense to victory in Super Bowl XXXV. Lewis also became the second linebacker to win the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award, and the first to win the award on the winning Super Bowl team. [2] Lewis won his second Defensive Player of the Year award in 2003, becoming the sixth player to win the award multiple times. [3] After a triceps tear that sidelined him for most of the 2012–13 season, Lewis returned for the Ravens' playoff run and earned his second Super Bowl victory in his final NFL game. On February 3, 2018, the fifth anniversary of his final game, Lewis was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. [4]

Several organizations give out NFL Defensive Player of the Year awards that are listed in the NFL Record and Fact Book and Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press (AP) has been giving the award since 1972; Pro Football Writers of America/Pro Football Weekly since 1970; and Sporting News has announced winners since 2008. The Newspaper Enterprise Association was the originator of the award in 1966. However, it became defunct after 1997. Also going defunct was the United Press International (UPI) AFC-NFC Defensive Player of the Year Awards that began in 1975.

Super Bowl XXXV 2001 Edition of the Super Bowl

Super Bowl XXXV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Baltimore Ravens and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New York Giants to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2000 season. The Ravens defeated the Giants by a score of 34–7, tied for the seventh largest Super Bowl margin of victory with Super Bowl XXXVII. The game was played on January 28, 2001 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.

Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award award

The Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award, or Super Bowl MVP, is presented annually to the most valuable player of the Super Bowl, the National Football League's (NFL) championship game. The winner is chosen by a panel of 16 football writers and broadcasters and, since Super Bowl XXXV in 2001, fans voting electronically. The media panel's ballots count for 80 percent of the vote tally, while the viewers' ballots make up the other 20 percent. The game's viewing audience can vote on the Internet or by using cellular phones; Media voters are asked to vote with about five minutes remaining in the game, but are allowed to change their mind when the game ends. They can nominate one player from each team, with instructions to count their vote for the player on the winning team. Voters cannot select an entire unit.

Early life

Lewis was born in Bartow, Florida. [5] He is the older brother of former University of Maryland running back Keon Lattimore. [6] Lewis was an All-American linebacker for the football team at Kathleen High School in Lakeland. In addition, he was a prolific wrestler for the school. [5] [7] His father was absent most of his life, which was a cycle through generations, but he was a record-setting high school wrestler before he was incarcerated for drug-related offenses. [8] He revealed that his stepfather was extremely abusive towards his mother, and got a deck of 52 playing cards to start his push-up regimen, so he could get stronger to protect her. This also was the reason behind choosing the #52 jersey in his professional career. [9]

Bartow, Florida City in Florida, United States

Bartow is the county seat of Polk County, Florida, United States. Founded in 1851 as Fort Blount, the city was renamed in honor of Francis S. Bartow, the first brigade commander of the Confederate Army to die in combat during the American Civil War. According to the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census, the city had a population of 15,340 and an estimated population of 16,959 in 2009. It is part of the Lakeland−Winter Haven Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had an estimated population of 584,383 in 2009. As of 2018, the mayor of Bartow is Leo Longworth.

High school football Secondary school competition in gridiron football

High school football is gridiron football played by high school teams in the United States and Canada. It ranks among the most popular interscholastic sports in both countries. It is also popular amongst American High school teams in Europe.

Lakeland, Florida City in Florida, United States

Lakeland is a city in Polk County, Florida, along Interstate 4 east of Tampa. The westernmost city in Polk County, it is part of the Tampa Bay Area. According to the 2013 U.S. Census Bureau estimate, the city had a population of 100,710. Lakeland is a principal city of the Lakeland–Winter Haven Metropolitan Statistical Area, which had an estimated population of 623,009 in July 2013 based on data from the University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research. It is twinned with Richmond Hill, Ontario; Imabari, Ehime, Japan; Bălți, Moldova; Portmore, Jamaica; and Chongming County, Shanghai, China through the Lakeland chapter of Sister Cities International.

College career

Lewis enrolled in the University of Miami, where he was a member of the Miami Hurricanes football team. [10] As a freshman, he was an immediate contributor and became a starter for the Hurricanes' final five games. He compiled 81 tackles, two sacks, two tackles for loss, and four pass deflections en route to being named to the freshman All-American team. [11]

University of Miami private university in Coral Gables, Florida, United States

The University of Miami is a private research university in Coral Gables, Florida. As of 2018, the university enrolls 17,331 students in 12 separate colleges/schools, including the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine in Miami's Health District, a law school on the main campus, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science focused on the study of oceanography and atmospheric sciences on Virginia Key, with research facilities at the Richmond Facility in southern Miami-Dade County.

Miami Hurricanes football College Football Bowl Subdivision team; member of Atlantic Coast Conference

The Miami Hurricanes football team represents the University of Miami in the sport of American football. The Hurricanes compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The program began in 1926 and has won five AP national championships. The Miami Hurricanes are among the most storied and decorated football programs in NCAA history. Miami is ranked fourth on the list of All-time Associated Press National Poll Championships, tied with Southern California and Ohio State and behind Alabama, Notre Dame, and Oklahoma. Miami also holds a number of NFL Draft records, including most first-round selections in a single draft and most consecutive drafts with at least one first-round selection. Two Hurricanes have won the Heisman Trophy and nine have been inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame. The team plays its home games at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. The Hurricanes' head coach is currently Manny Diaz.

In his sophomore season, Lewis earned first-team All-American and All-Big East honors. Lewis led the Big East with 153 tackles and also contributed nine tackles for a loss, two sacks, and an interception for a Hurricanes team that had the nation's top-ranked defense and finished No. 6 in both the writers' and coaches' polls. [12] [13]

Lewis's junior campaign was even more successful, as he was again named to the All-American [14] and All-Big East teams, and finished as runner-up for the Butkus Award, given to the top linebacker in college football. [15] Lewis finished his junior season with 160 tackles, the second highest in University of Miami team history after Ed Weisacosky's 164 in 1965. Lewis also totaled eight tackles for loss, two sacks, two interceptions, a forced fumble, four pass deflections and one touchdown. Against the West Virginia Mountaineers, Lewis contributed 15 tackles. [16]

Lewis led the Big East in tackles his last two seasons and accumulated the fifth most in Miami history despite playing only three seasons.

After the 1995 season, Lewis decided to forgo his final year of college eligibility and enter the NFL draft. The Baltimore Ravens, who were entering their inaugural season, selected Lewis 26th overall in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft. [17] Lewis was the Ravens' second ever draft pick behind offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden who was selected #4 overall the same year. Lewis eventually earned his undergraduate degree in Arts and Science in 2004 at the University of Maryland University College. [18]

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
HtWtArm lengthHand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad Wonderlic
6 ft 0 38 in
(1.84 m)
235 lb
(107 kg)
34 18 in
(0.87 m)
9 38 in
(0.24 m)
4.58 s13
All values from NFL Combine [19] [20]

1996 season: Rookie year

Lewis was the top-rated inside linebacker heading into the 1996 NFL Draft, [21] [22] in which Kevin Hardy was considered the draft's only outstanding linebacker prospect. [23] Taken as the fifth linebacker in the draft, Lewis was seen by scouts as possessing speed, tackling ability, and intensity, but many considered his lack of size a potential liability. [23] [24] [25] In his first career game, a Week 1 19-14 victory over the Oakland Raiders, Lewis earned AFC Defensive Player of the Week for his seven-tackle, one-interception performance. [26] [27] Lewis earned USA Today's All-Rookie team honors after his 15 tackles for loss led the NFL and 110 tackles led the Ravens in the 1996 season. [28] He added two and a half sacks, six pass deflections, and an interception on the season. [29] [30]

1997 season

In Week 9, against the Washington Redskins, Lewis earned his second AFC Defensive Player of the Week honor. [31] Lewis recorded an NFL-best and career high 184 tackles in 1997, which is unofficially the second most ever in a season, and earned his first Pro Bowl berth at the end of that season. [32] [33] In addition, Lewis totaled four sacks, an interception, a forced fumble, a fumble recovery, and 11 pass deflections. [34]

1998 season

In 1998, Lewis made his second trip to the Pro Bowl after recording 120 tackles, three sacks, two interceptions, a forced fumble, and seven pass deflections. [35] [36] He led the Ravens in tackles for the third consecutive season. [37] He was also named to The Sporting News All-Pro Team. In what would prove to be Hall of Fame Detroit Lions running back Barry Sanders's final game, Lewis and the rest of the Ravens defense held him to just 41 rushing yards on 19 attempts. [38] [39]

1999 season

In 1999, Lewis led the NFL in tackles with 168. [40] He was named to a third-straight Pro Bowl and the All-Pro first team. [41] [42] He also totaled three and a half sacks, three interceptions, eight pass deflections, a safety, and a forced fumble. Lewis won the 1999 NFL Alumni Linebacker Of The Year chosen by past NFL players voting according to the position they played.

2000: Record-setting defense and first Super Bowl run

In 2000, Lewis led a defense which many call the greatest in NFL history for a single season. [43] [44] [45] The team set a 16-game single-season record for fewest points allowed (165) and fewest rushing yards allowed (970). [46] The team recorded four shutouts, one shy of the single-season record. The unit finished first league-wide in six key defensive categories. Including the postseason, and excluding three combined touchdowns that were given up by the Ravens offense and special teams, Baltimore’s defense allowed only 184 points in 20 games. Lewis won Super Bowl XXXV MVP honors, Defensive Player of the Year honors, earned a unanimous All-Pro selection, and was once again named to start in the Pro Bowl. [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] The Ravens became only the second team to ever record a defensive shutout in a Super Bowl, as they dominated the New York Giants 34-7 to win the franchise’s first ever world championship. Lewis’s regular-season total of 137 tackles once again led the Ravens. He also added 31 tackles, two interceptions, 9 pass deflections, one fumble recovery, and a touchdown in the four-game playoff run. [52] [53]

2001 season

In 2001, Lewis earned his fifth consecutive Pro Bowl selection, when he led the NFL in tackles with 162 and earned first-team All-Pro honors. [54] [55] [56] In Week 15, he earned his third AFC Defensive Player of the Week honor in a 15–0 shutout of the Cincinnati Bengals. [57] Lewis scored a touchdown in the 2002 Pro Bowl. In the Ravens' two playoff games, he totaled 17 tackles, three forced fumbles, and one pass deflection. [58]

2002 season

In 2002, Lewis was limited to only five games due to a shoulder injury. [59] He still managed to rank fifth on the team with 58 tackles. [60] In addition, Lewis compiled two interceptions, two pass deflections, a forced fumble and a fumble recovery. Lewis earned AFC Defensive Player of the Week honors in Week 4 against the Denver Broncos after posting 18 tackles (11 solo), two pass deflections, and an interception on Monday Night Football . [61] After having been selected to the Pro Bowl for five consecutive seasons (1997–2001), Lewis's streak was stopped by his season-ending injury. In his absence, the Baltimore Ravens defense finished ranked 19th in points allowed. [62]

Lewis roaming the sidelines in a 2005 game at Ford Field in Detroit Ray Lewis at Ford Field, Detroit.JPG
Lewis roaming the sidelines in a 2005 game at Ford Field in Detroit

2003 season

Lewis was the leading vote recipient for the 2003 AP All-Pro team, earning 49 of 50 votes. [63] He also won the annual AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year with 43 votes out of 50. [64] He was named to his sixth career Pro Bowl for the 2003 season. [65] Additionally, Lewis earned Pro Football Weekly, PFWA, and Football Digest Defensive MVP honors and was named to Dr. Z's Sports Illustrated All-Pro team, Pro Football Weekly's All-NFL team, Pro Football Weekly's All-AFC team, Football Digest's All-Pro first team, and The Sporting News' All-Pro team. Lewis also earned the KC 101 AFC Defensive Player of the Year award for the 3rd time in four years, the 2003 NFL Alumni Linebacker Of The Year, and finished with 161 tackles, one and a half sacks, six interceptions, two forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries, 14 pass deflections, and one touchdown. He was named NFL Defensive Player of the Month for November [66] and AFC Defensive Player of the week for his 15-tackle, one-interception performance against the Pittsburgh Steelers in week 17. [67] In the Wild Card playoff loss to the Tennessee Titans, Lewis totaled 17 tackles. [68]

2004 season

In 2004, Lewis was named first-team All-Pro by the AP, second-team "All Pro" by College and Pro Football Weekly and Football Digest, and "All Pro" by The Sporting News. [69] He finished the 2004 season playing 15 games while recording 146 total tackles, one sack, two fumble recoveries, one fumble forced, and six pass deflections. [70]

2005 season

Lewis's 2005 season was cut short by an injury in Week 6. He was placed on injured reserve in Week 8, having amassed 46 tackles, a sack, an interception, 2 pass deflections, and a fumble recovery in the season's first six games. [71] The Ravens struggled to a final record of 6-10.

2006 season

In 2006, Lewis led the Ravens defense to an NFL-best ranking in 14 major defensive categories, including total yards allowed, points per game allowed, and interceptions. The Ravens also finished second in sacks, take-aways, and rushing yards allowed. [72] Lewis missed two games due to an injury, but still recorded 103 tackles, a personal best of five sacks, two interceptions, and eight pass deflections in 14 games. He also forced a fumble and recovered one. [73] The Ravens allowed just one 100-yard rushing performance in the 14 games Lewis played. Lewis was named AFC Defensive Player of the Week following his seven-tackle, one-sack, and three-pass-deflection performance against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the season opener. [74] He was also selected to the Pro Bowl, but withdrew because of a hand injury, ceding his spot to fellow Ravens linebacker Bart Scott. [75] [76] Lewis finished fifth in voting for Defensive Player of the Year. [77] Lewis totaled 15 tackles and a pass deflection in the playoff loss to the Indianapolis Colts. [78]

2007 season

Lewis during a 2007 game vs. the Cleveland Browns Ray Lewis 2007.jpg
Lewis during a 2007 game vs. the Cleveland Browns
Lewis during a charity event Raypic.jpg
Lewis during a charity event

Despite the Baltimore Ravens' mediocre 5–11 season, Lewis was the team's leading tackler. [79] Against the Cleveland Browns, Lewis recorded 16 tackles, recovered a fumble, and returned an interception for a touchdown. [80] He also earned his ninth career Pro Bowl nomination. [81] He finished the season with 120 total tackles, two sacks, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, 10 passes deflected, two interceptions, and one touchdown. [82]

2008 season

In 2008, Lewis led the Ravens to the AFC Championship game while totaling 117 tackles, three and a half sacks, three interceptions, two forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries, and nine passes deflected. [83] [84] He was named a starter to the Pro Bowl, his tenth such nomination, and was named an Associated Press first-team All-Pro for the sixth time. [85] [86] In addition, he was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Week following his eight tackles, two interception, and two pass deflections against the Houston Texans in Week 10. [87] In the three playoff games against the Miami Dolphins, Tennessee Titans, and Pittsburgh Steelers, Lewis totaled 29 tackles, two forced fumbles, and one pass deflection in three games. [88] [89] [90] After the season, he became an unrestricted free agent, but agreed to return to the Baltimore Ravens to complete his career. The contract, which would've run through 2015 (including two option years), was said to be worth $10 million the first year, but was highly incentivized. [91]

2009 season

In 2009, Lewis was named first-team All-Pro by the Associated Press for the seventh time (ninth selection overall) and named to his 11th Pro Bowl. [92] [93] He accumulated an AFC-leading 134 tackles on the season. [94] He also added three sacks, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, and seven passes deflected. Lewis added 21 tackles, one sack, and one pass deflection in two playoff games. [95] In the September 2009 issue of Sporting News' Magazine, Lewis was selected to their Team of the Decade (2000s). In Week 2 against the San Diego Chargers, Lewis made the game-saving tackle on running back Darren Sproles on a fourth-down play. After the game, Lewis said it was one of the best tackles he has made in his career. [96]

2010 season

In 2010, Lewis was named second-team All-Pro by the Associated Press for the third time (10th All-Pro selection overall) and named to his 12th Pro Bowl. [97] He totaled 139 tackles, two sacks, two interceptions, two forced fumbles, three fumble recoveries, four pass deflections, and one touchdown. Lewis added 13 tackles, one sack, and a forced fumble in two playoff games. [98] On Sunday, November 21, 2010, Lewis became only the second player in NFL history to record at least 30 interceptions and 30 sacks for their career. He was the fastest player (204 games) to achieve that feat.

2011 season

In 2011, Lewis was named to his 13th and what proved to be his final Pro Bowl, and led the Ravens with 95 tackles despite missing four games with an injury. [99] Lewis also collected two sacks, one interception, two forced fumbles, and seven pass deflections. Lewis totaled 20 tackles and one pass deflection in two playoff games. [100] [101] On Sunday, October 16, 2011, against the Houston Texans, Lewis became the first player in NFL history with at least 40 sacks and 30 interceptions in his career. [102]

2012: Final year and second Super Bowl

Lewis suffered torn triceps on October 14, 2012 during a game against the Dallas Cowboys, and had them surgically repaired three days later. [103] [104] [105] Several sources had reported he was expected to return to action December 16 in the game against the Denver Broncos, [106] much earlier than his expected return in January, [107] but he was inactive for the game. [108] On January 2, 2013, Lewis announced he would retire after his team finished the 2012–13 NFL playoffs. [109]

He returned to action for Baltimore's January 6, 2013 game against the Colts and led the defense to a 24–9 win. [110] On the game's last play, Lewis lined up on offense at fullback. The Ravens were not slated to play another home playoff game (since they were the number-four seed, and the day before, the Houston Texans beat the number-six seed Cincinnati Bengals), so they wanted Lewis to be on the field for the final play. Next, the Ravens defeated the Denver Broncos in the Divisional Round, 38–35 in double overtime, and then defeated the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game, 28–13. [111] [112] [113] Lewis's final career NFL game was Super Bowl XLVII, where the Ravens defeated the San Francisco 49ers by a score of 34–31. [114] [115] Lewis finished the regular season with 57 tackles, 1 sack, 1 forced fumble, 1 fumble recovery, and 1 pass deflection in 6 games. In the postseason, Lewis led the NFL with 51 tackles. He also contributed 2 tackles for loss and 1 pass deflection in the Super Bowl XLVII run. [116]

Career statistics

TacklesSacksInterceptionsOther
YearTeamGamesSoloAstTotalSackYdsIntYdsTDTDFFRecPDSfty
1996 BAL 1495151102.5910000050
1997 BAL 16156281844.0271180011100
1998 BAL 14101191203.014225001070
1999 BAL 16131371683.521397000081
2000 BAL 16108301383.03321000360
2001 BAL 16114481623.52631150011100
2002 BAL 54315580.0024001130
2003 BAL 16121421631.5116991122140
2004 BAL 15101461471.0900001260
2005 BAL 6388461.0110000120
2006 BAL 1480231035.037227001180
2007 BAL 1483381212.072351121100
2008 BAL 1684331173.533343002290
2009 BAL 1694391333.01609002170
2010 BAL 16102371392.08226112340
2011 BAL 1272239521614002070
2012 BAL 64413571000001110
Career2281,5674942,06141.5266315033319201171
Playoffs21135792142.0172541161150

Murder trial

Following a Super Bowl XXXIV party in Atlanta on January 31, 2000, a fight broke out between Lewis and his companions and another group of people, resulting in the stabbing deaths of Jacinth Baker and Richard Lollar. Lewis and two companions, Reginald Oakley and Joseph Sweeting, were questioned by Atlanta police, and 11 days later the three men were indicted on murder and aggravated assault charges. The fight occurred about 200 yards (180 m) from the Cobalt Lounge at 265 East Paces Ferry Road in the Buckhead Village neighborhood about two miles north of downtown Atlanta where Lewis had been celebrating. [117] [118] The white suit Lewis was wearing the night of the killings has never been found. Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard alleged the blood-stained suit was dumped in a garbage bin outside a fast food restaurant. [119] A knife found at the scene did not have any fingerprints or DNA. Lewis subsequently testified that Oakley and Sweeting had bought knives earlier in Super Bowl week from a Sports Authority where Lewis had been signing autographs. [118] [120] Baker's blood was found inside of Lewis's limousine. [121]

Two weeks into the trial Lewis's attorneys, Don Samuel and Ed Garland, negotiated a plea agreement with the District Attorney where the murder charges against Lewis were dismissed in exchange for his testimony against Oakley and Sweeting, [122] and his guilty plea to a misdemeanor charge of obstruction of justice. [15] Lewis admitted he gave a misleading statement to police on the morning after the killings (initially telling them that he was not at the scene). [123] Superior Court Judge Alice D. Bonner sentenced Lewis to 12 months' probation. One year in prison is the maximum sentence for a first-time offender, [124] and the immediate probation was the judge's decision. He was also fined $250,000 by the NFL, which was believed to be the highest fine levied against an NFL player for an infraction not involving substance abuse. [125] Under the terms of the sentence, Lewis could not use drugs or alcohol during the duration of the probation.

Oakley and Sweeting were acquitted of the charges in June 2000. [126] [127] No other suspects have ever been arrested for the incident.

The following year, Lewis was named Super Bowl XXXV MVP. However, the signature phrase "I'm going to Disney World!" was given instead to quarterback Trent Dilfer. [2]

On April 29, 2004, Lewis reached a out-of-court settlement with four-year-old India Lollar, born months after the death of her father Richard, pre-empting a scheduled civil proceeding. Lewis also reached an undisclosed settlement with Baker's family. [126]

During a taped pre-game interview with Shannon Sharpe that aired on CBS before Super Bowl XLVII, Sharpe told Lewis that the families of the slain men find it difficult to see Lewis idolized by millions of fans, believing he knows more about the killings than he shared, [128] and asked what he had to say to those families. Lewis responded, "God has never made a mistake. That's just who He is, you see.... To the family, if you knew, if you really knew the way God works, He don't use people who commits anything like that for His glory." [129]

The Ravens' crisis management around Lewis's murder trial was revisited by Brian Billick, by then a media analyst, after the 2013 arrest of Aaron Hernandez and his swift release by the New England Patriots. [130]

Legacy

Throughout his career, Lewis built a reputation as a leader and intimidating force at middle linebacker. He has led his team in tackles in 12 of his 14 seasons. The Ravens did not allow a single 100-yard rusher in 51 consecutive games from the 1998 through 2001 seasons. In addition to his run defense, Lewis has also gained a reputation as a complete defender. His 31 interceptions rank him 5th all-time among NFL linebackers, and just 6 short of the #1 spot. Since the murder allegations, Lewis's image has recovered, and today he is considered one of the most dominant linebackers in the history of the NFL. [18] [131] [132] [133] Lewis was also selected as the third-best linebacker of all time on the show The Sports List . A poll of NFL coaches selected him as the most dominant player in the NFL before the 2003 season by being mentioned on 10 ballots, while no other player was mentioned more than twice. [134] Team owner Steve Bisciotti stated his intention to erect a statue of Lewis outside M&T Bank Stadium. On September 4, 2014, days before the Ravens season opener, a statue of Lewis was unveiled in front of M&T Bank Stadium. [135]

Lewis has been referenced in television shows such as The Wire , films such as The Rundown , and in music videos, such as in Mario's "Just a Friend 2002" and Nelly's "Heart of a Champion". Lewis has appeared in television ads for NFL Network, Reebok, Under Armour, Old Spice, and Eastern Motors. He was the featured athlete on the cover of Madden NFL 2005 . That season, he missed a number of games to an injury, adding to the "Madden Curse". He was documented in NFL Network's documentary series A Football Life . [136]

Other work

Lewis opened the Ray Lewis Full Moon Bar-B-Que, which operated in Baltimore's Canton neighborhood from February 2005 until 2008. [137] He has also gained several national corporate endorsements, some of which draw upon his tough image. In 2004, Lewis was placed on the cover of the highly popular Madden NFL 2005 video game published by EA Sports, and is also a very avid player of the same series. In 2006, it was announced that Lewis, Hall of Fame running back Gale Sayers, and entrepreneur Mark Bloomquist would form S&L Racing, intending to race both cars and trucks from a North Carolina headquarters. [138] Lewis's attempt to join NASCAR racing failed. [139]

On March 13, 2013, it was announced that Lewis would join ESPN as a contributor for their NFL coverage. [140] Lewis was let go by ESPN in 2016. [141] On June 20, 2017 it was announced Lewis had been hired by cable sports network Fox Sports 1. [142]

Lewis competed against tight end Tony Gonzalez in an episode of Spike's Lip Sync Battle , which aired on February 2, 2017. He emerged victorious with performances of Al Green's "Let's Stay Together" and "Hot in Herre" by Nelly, who joined him for the performance. [143]

Charitable activities

Lewis has been heavily involved in charitable activities throughout his professional career. He started the Ray Lewis 52 Foundation which is a nonprofit corporation whose mission is to provide personal and economic assistance to disadvantaged youth. The foundation has funded such events as adopting 10 families in the Baltimore City community for the holidays, an annual celebrity auction and bowling tournament, the Great Maryland Duck Derby, Thanksgiving food drives on North Avenue in Baltimore, and Ray's Summer Days. All proceeds have helped fund the Ray Lewis Foundation.

Lewis has since been involved in pressing political, business, and philanthropic leaders for a stronger commitment to disability sports both here and in the developing world. Lewis was also honored with a JB award (named in honor of CBS broadcaster James Brown) during the 2006 off-season and received the "Act of Kindness" Award for his work in the community. [18]

Awards and accolades

Since his rookie year in 1996, Lewis has won numerous NFL awards, including being named Defensive Player of the Year twice (2000 and 2003), as well as Super Bowl MVP after winning Super Bowl XXXV after the 2000 season. He is also a 13-time Pro Bowler and seven-time AP First Team All-Pro player, a three-time AP Second Team All-Pro Selection, and was also a two-time All-American in college (1994 and 1995).

On May 11, 2010, a portion of Baltimore's North Avenue was renamed "Ray Lewis Way" in honor of the linebacker and his charitable work. [144]

Lewis had career totals of 2,061 total tackles (1,567 solo), 19 forced fumbles, 117 passes defended, 102.5 stuffs for a loss, 41.5 sacks, 20 fumble recoveries, 31 interceptions for 503 yards, one safety, and three touchdowns in 228 games. [145] He has been selected to 13 NFL Pro Bowl games, a record for an inside/middle linebacker, in his 17 seasons, and led the NFL in tackles five times (1997, 1999, 2001, 2003 and 2004). In 2003, Lewis led all linebackers with six interceptions, a total matching the post-merger all-time record for a middle linebacker in a single season. [146] Lewis was named first-team Associated Press All-Pro in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009 and second-team All-Pro in 1997, 1998, and 2010. His 10 total All-Pro selections is a record for an inside/middle linebacker and ties the record for a linebacker (Lawrence Taylor also has 10 selections). In 21 career playoff games, Lewis has totaled 214 tackles (135 solo), two sacks, six forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, two interceptions for 54 yards, 15 pass deflections, 10.5 stuffs for a loss, and one touchdown.

Lewis was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2018, his first year of eligibility. Lewis joined teammate Jonathan Ogden in Canton; the two were the Ravens' first two picks in Baltimore.

Personal life

Lewis is a Christian, and his commitment to his faith was featured in a Sports Illustrated cover story in 2006. He has a total of six children, four boys, and two girls. [147] [7] [148] His son, Ray Lewis III, played college football at the University of Miami and later Coastal Carolina. [149] He was dismissed from Coastal Carolina's football team and the university in 2016 upon being indicted by a South Carolina grand jury on a charge of third-degree criminal sexual assault. [150] His other son, Rayshad Lewis, committed to Utah State out of high school. His freshman year was successful. After his freshman year, Rayshad decided to transfer to the University of Maryland. [151]

Michael Phelps, a Baltimore native and Ravens fan, stated that he found his life purpose and desire to compete in the 2016 Summer Olympics after seeking Lewis's advice. [152] [153]

In 2015, Lewis' autobiography, I Feel Like Going On: Life, Game, and Glory, was published. [book 1]

Related Research Articles

Peter Boulware former professional football player

Peter Nicholas Boulware is a former American college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons. He played college football for Florida State University, and was recognized as an All-American. A first-round pick of the Baltimore Ravens in the 1997 NFL Draft, he played his entire pro career for the Ravens.

Ed Reed American football player, defensive back, safety

Edward Earl Reed Jr. is a former American football safety who spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Miami, where he was a two-time consensus All-American. He was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 2002 NFL Draft and played eleven seasons for Baltimore before playing with the Houston Texans and New York Jets in 2013.

London Fletcher American football player, linebacker

London Levi Fletcher is a former American football linebacker who played in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at John Carroll, and signed with the St. Louis Rams as an undrafted free agent in 1998. Fletcher also played for the Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins.

Troy Polamalu American football player, safety and American football executive

Troy Aumua Polamalu is a former American football strong safety of Samoan descent who played his entire twelve-year career for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Southern California (USC) and earned consensus All-American honors. He was chosen by the Steelers in the first round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He was a member of two of the Steelers' Super Bowl championship teams and was the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2010. Polamalu is an eight time Pro-Bowler and a six time All-Pro selection. He was also the Head of Player Relations of the Alliance of American Football.

Brian Dawkins American football safety

Brian Patrick Dawkins Sr is a former American football safety who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Clemson and was drafted by the Eagles in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft, whom he was a member of for 13 seasons. In his last three seasons, he played for the Denver Broncos.

Derrick Johnson All-American college football player, professional football player, linebacker

Derrick O’Hara Johnson is a former American football linebacker. He played college football at the University of Texas at Austin, where he earned consensus All-American honors twice. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs with the 15th overall selection in first round the 2005 NFL Draft. In his 13 seasons with the Chiefs, he made four Pro Bowls. He also played a season for the Oakland Raiders.

Terrell Suggs American football player, defensive lineman, defensive end

Terrell Raymonn Suggs, nicknamed "T-Sizzle," is an American football outside linebacker for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arizona State, and was recognized as a unanimous All-American. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens tenth overall in the 2003 NFL Draft, and is the franchise's all-time leader in sacks.

Haloti Ngata American football defensive tackle

Etuini Haloti Ngata is a former American football defensive tackle. He played college football for the University of Oregon and earned consensus All-American honors. Ngata was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft, and was selected for the Pro Bowl five times. Ngata played for the Ravens for nine seasons before being traded to the Detroit Lions before the 2015 NFL season. Ngata was also a member of the Philadelphia Eagles for one season in 2018 before retiring.

Lawrence Timmons American football player

Lawrence Olajuwon Timmons is an American football linebacker who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft. He would later win Super Bowl XLIII with the Steelers over the Arizona Cardinals. He played college football at Florida State.

Earl Thomas American football safety

Earl Winty Thomas III is an American football free safety for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the first round of the 2010 NFL Draft and would later assist with the team's first Super Bowl victory in Super Bowl XLVIII against the Denver Broncos. He played college football at Texas and received consensus All-American honors.

Vontaze Burfict American football linebacker

Vontaze DeLeon Burfict Jr. is an American football linebacker for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arizona State. Considered the most highly ranked football prospect Arizona State ever signed to a letter of intent, Burfict was recognized as an All-American in 2010 and projected an early first round pick for the 2012 NFL Draft. However, a mediocre on-field performance and poor pre-draft workouts deteriorated his draft stock and he ultimately went unselected. He was subsequently signed by the Cincinnati Bengals as an undrafted free agent in 2012, where he played for seven seasons.

Darian Stewart American football strong safety

Darian Stewart is an American football strong safety who is currently a free agent. He was signed by the St. Louis Rams as an undrafted free agent after the 2010 NFL Draft and has also played for the Baltimore Ravens. As a member of the Denver Broncos, he won a Super Bowl ring in Super Bowl 50 over the Carolina Panthers. He was named to his first Pro Bowl in 2017. He played college football at South Carolina.

Luke Kuechly American football middle linebacker

Luke August Kuechly is an American football linebacker for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Panthers ninth overall in the 2012 NFL Draft. He played college football at Boston College where he was recognized twice as a consensus All-American. Kuechly had an immediate impact his rookie season, as he led the NFL in tackles and won the Associated Press 2012 NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year award, becoming the third youngest recipient in its history. In 2013, Kuechly became the youngest recipient of the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award in its history.

Ryan Kerrigan American football outside linebacker

Patrick Ryan Kerrigan is an American football outside linebacker for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American, and was drafted by the Redskins in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft. He is the all-time leader for consecutive starts by a left outside linebacker in NFL history.

Zach Brown American football inside linebacker

Zachary Brown is an American football linebacker for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at University of North Carolina and was drafted by the Tennessee Titans in the second round of the 2012 NFL Draft. He has also played for the Buffalo Bills, where he made the Pro Bowl.

C. J. Mosley (linebacker) American football linebacker

Clint Mosley Jr. is an American football linebacker for the New York Jets of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama, and was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Jamie Collins (American football) American football linebacker

Jamie Collins Sr. is an American football linebacker for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Patriots in the second round of the 2013 NFL Draft and has also played for the Cleveland Browns. He played college football at Southern Mississippi.

Ryan Shazier American football linebacker

Ryan Dean Shazier is an American football linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Steelers in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at Ohio State.

Christian Kirksey American football player

Christian Kirksey is an American football linebacker for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Browns in the third round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at Iowa.

Tyus Bowser is an American football linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Houston.

References

  1. "Lewis Bio". baltimoreravens.com. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved August 16, 2007.
  2. 1 2 Associated Press (January 31, 2001). "Endorsement exile: Disney, Wheaties among those passing on MVP Lewis". CNNSI.com.
  3. "Lewis wins DPOY". espn.com. Retrieved August 16, 2007.
  4. "Ray Lewis, Terrell Owens, Randy Moss lead HOF class".
  5. 1 2 "Ray Lewis NFL Bio". NFL. Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  6. "Player Bio: Keon Lattimore". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on February 7, 2009. Retrieved January 28, 2011.
  7. 1 2 Price, S.L. (November 13, 2006). "The Gospel According To Ray". Sports Illustrated . Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  8. ESPN (October 3, 2012), E:60 – Ray Lewis
  9. "How To Use Pain As Fuel - The Deck of Cards Workout - Daniel Karim". Daniel Karim. December 22, 2017. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  10. "Ray Lewis College Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  11. "Pillars of the Program: Miami (Fla.)". www.ncaa.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  12. Washington, Matt (February 3, 2018). "Ray Lewis Named to 2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame Class". State of The U. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  13. "Miami In the Polls". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on September 26, 2011. Retrieved January 28, 2011.
  14. Ralph Hickok (January 27, 2010). "History – Football All-America Teams 1977–present". Hickok Sports.com. Archived from the original on February 23, 2002. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  15. 1 2 "ESPN Classic – Lewis knows Super Bowl tragedy, triumph". Espn.go.com. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  16. "Ray Lewis Inspires Students on Return Visit to UM". UNIV Miami.
  17. "1996 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  18. 1 2 3 "FYI Online". Umuc.edu. June 28, 2004. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  19. "Ray Lewis - ILB - Miami (FL) - NFL Combine Results". nflcombineresults.com.
  20. Reed, Jesse. "Ray Lewis vs. Patrick Willis: Comparing the Past and Present of the LB Position".
  21. Saraceno, Jon (April 16, 1996). "Picking is slim for teams needing linebackers, tackles". USA Today .
  22. Plaschke, Bill (April 19, 1996). "Rating the NFL Draft". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  23. 1 2 Marquez, Alex (April 18, 1996). "Illinois' Hardy only top linebacker in draft". Dayton Daily News .
  24. Mulhern, Tom (April 19, 1996). "Packers in desperate need for more depth at linebacker". The Capital Times . Archived from the original on October 19, 2015. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  25. "NFL Draft: Top prospects // Defense". The Orange County Register . April 20, 1996. p. D15.
  26. Walker, Childs. "Timeline of Ray Lewis' career". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  27. "1996 NFL Week 1 Leaders & Scores". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  28. "1996 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  29. "1996 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  30. "Ray Lewis 1996 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  31. "1997 NFL Week 9 Leaders & Scores". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  32. "1997 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  33. "1997 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  34. "Ray Lewis 1997 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  35. "1998 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  36. "1998 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  37. "1998 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  38. "NFL Box Score for 12/27/1998". databaseFootball.com. December 27, 1998. Archived from the original on June 10, 2011. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  39. "Detroit Lions at Baltimore Ravens - December 27th, 1998". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  40. "1999 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  41. "1999 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  42. "1999 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  43. Byrne, Kerry (June 26, 2008). "The greatest defenses of the Super Bowl Era". ColdHardFootballFacts.com. Archived from the original on February 3, 2013.
  44. "The List: Best NFL defense of all-time". ESPN Page 2.
  45. WolfpackSteelersFan (March 10, 2009). "A Statistical Analysis on the Greatest Defenses in NFL History". SB Nation: Behind the Steel Curtain.
  46. Lewis, Brian (January 21, 2001). "QUOTH THE RAVENS: NEVER SCORE : RECORD-SETTING DEFENSE REFUSES TO GIVE AN INCH". New York Post. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  47. "Super Bowl XXXV - Baltimore Ravens vs. New York Giants - January 28th, 2001". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  48. "Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  49. "AP Defensive Player of the Year Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  50. "2000 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  51. "2000 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  52. "2000 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  53. "Ray Lewis 2000 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  54. "2001 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  55. "2001 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  56. "2001 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  57. "Cincinnati Bengals at Baltimore Ravens - December 23rd, 2001". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  58. "Ray Lewis 2001 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  59. "Ray Lewis 2002 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  60. "2002 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  61. "Green, Tomlinson share AFC award". NFL.com. October 2, 2002. Archived from the original on October 19, 2002. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  62. "2002 NFL Standings & Team Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  63. "2003 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  64. "AP Defensive Player of the Year Winners". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  65. "2003 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  66. "Kitna, Lewis and Vanderjagt earn AFC honor". NFL.com. March 18, 2004. Archived from the original on March 18, 2004. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  67. "Brady, Lewis, Anderson earn AFC honors". NFL.com. February 15, 2004. Archived from the original on February 15, 2004. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  68. "Ray Lewis 2003 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  69. "2004 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  70. "Ray Lewis 2004 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  71. "Ray Lewis 2005 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  72. "2006 NFL Standings & Team Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  73. "Ray Lewis 2006 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  74. "Pennington, Lewis, Vinatieri earn AFC honors". NFL.com. September 13, 2006. Archived from the original on July 13, 2007. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  75. "2006 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  76. Associated Press (January 30, 2007). "Teammate Scott to replace injured Lewis in Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  77. Associated Press (January 6, 2007). "Dolphins' Taylor wins Defensive Player of Year". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  78. "Ray Lewis 2006 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  79. "2007 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  80. "Cleveland Browns at Baltimore Ravens - November 18th, 2007". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  81. "2007 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  82. "Ray Lewis 2007 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  83. "2008 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  84. "Ray Lewis 2008 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  85. "2008 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  86. "2008 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  87. "2008 NFL Week 10 Leaders & Scores". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  88. "Wild Card - Baltimore Ravens at Miami Dolphins - January 4th, 2009". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  89. "Divisional Round - Baltimore Ravens at Tennessee Titans - January 10th, 2009". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  90. "AFC Championship - Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers - January 18th, 2009". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  91. Associated Press (March 11, 2009). "Lewis Re-Ups With Ravens". SI.com.
  92. "2009 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  93. "2009 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  94. "2009 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  95. "Ray Lewis 2009 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  96. Corbett, Jim (September 20, 2009). "Ray Lewis the 'firestarter' as thumping hit stops Chargers". USA Today. Retrieved September 27, 2009.
  97. "2010 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  98. "Ray Lewis 2010 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  99. "2011 NFL Pro Bowlers". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  100. "Ray Lewis 2011 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  101. "2011 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  102. "Houston Texans vs. Baltimore Ravens – Recap". ESPN.com. October 16, 2011. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  103. Brooks, Matt. "Ray Lewis is done for the year with a torn triceps". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  104. "The zany story of two self ordained sports science entrepreneurs". Sports Illustrated. January 29, 2013. Retrieved February 10, 2013.
  105. Bell, Jarrett (January 29, 2013). "Ray Lewis denies using banned deer antler spray". USA Today. Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  106. "Source: Ray Lewis back Dec. 16". ESPN. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  107. "Word of Mouth: Owners, don't be shortsighted – NFL Videos". NFL.com. December 6, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  108. Schefter, Adam; Paolantonio, Sal (December 15, 2012). "Ray Lewis of Baltimore Ravens not activated for Broncos game". ESPN. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  109. "Ravens' Lewis says he will retire at end of season". TSN.ca. January 2, 2013. Retrieved January 2, 2013.
  110. "Wild Card - Indianapolis Colts at Baltimore Ravens - January 6th, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  111. "Divisional Round - Baltimore Ravens at Denver Broncos - January 12th, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  112. Hanzus, Dan (January 20, 2013). "Ravens roll by Patriots to advance to Super Bowl XLVII". National Football League . Retrieved January 20, 2013.
  113. "AFC Championship - Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots - January 20th, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  114. "Ravens Are Super Bowl Champs! Take Close Win Over The 49ers 34–31". WJZ-TV . February 3, 2013. Retrieved February 3, 2013.
  115. "Super Bowl XLVII - San Francisco 49ers vs. Baltimore Ravens - February 3rd, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  116. "Ray Lewis 2012 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  117. "Buckhead Village to get a Coyote Ugly Saloon – Atlanta Business Chronicle". Bizjournals.com. July 29, 2002. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  118. 1 2 "CNNSI.com – 2000 Bloody Monday – Does NFL star Ray Lewis' arrest for murder taint the game? – Friday March 03, 2000 02:02 PM". Sportsillustrated.cnn.com. March 3, 2000. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  119. "Lewis murder charges dropped". CNNSI. Retrieved October 18, 2010.
  120. "LawScope.com". Artclu.com. June 12, 2000. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  121. Schrotenboer, Brent (January 12, 2013). "Slayings not forgotten, Ray Lewis not forgiven". USA Today. Retrieved January 30, 2013.
  122. Morgan, Jon; Athans, Marego (June 7, 2000). "Cognac, knives and fists".
  123. Yahoo! Sports: Ray Lewis, the shy, quiet kid from Connestee Street, dealing with the pain of ailing grandmother. January 28, 2013.
  124. "Lewis murder charges dropped". CNN. June 5, 2000. Archived from the original on February 13, 2014.
  125. "NFL Fines Ray Lewis $250,000 – ABC News". Abcnews.go.com. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  126. 1 2 "Ravens' Lewis reaches settlement with victim's daughter". Sportsline.com. May 2, 2004. Archived from the original on November 26, 2007. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  127. Gordon, Chris (June 12, 2000). "Two Friends of Baltimore Ravens Ray Lewis Found Not Guilty in the Superbowl (sic) Murder Trial". LawScope.com.
  128. Florio, Mike. "Ray Lewis once again dances around issue of Super Bowl XXXIV murders". Pro Football Talk. NBC Sports. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  129. Pierce, Scott (February 5, 2013). "Pierce: CBS needs to waive Shannon Sharpe after Ray Lewis interview". Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  130. Billick, Brian (June 27, 2013). "Ravens' handling of Ray Lewis case a lesson in managing crisis". NFL Enterprises.
  131. Players to rave about, Pro Football Weekly, 2000, archived from the original on August 20, 2013
  132. "Features – NFL pro football articles and coverage from Pro Football Weekly". Pro Football Weekly. 2002. Archived from the original on September 25, 2009.
  133. "No. 18: The ultimate defender — Ray Lewis". USA Today. June 28, 2007. Retrieved May 22, 2010.
  134. Glazer, Jay (June 13, 2003). "Most dominant in NFL? Ponder the Raven". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2007. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  135. Jones, Luke (February 7, 2013). "Ravens have plans for ring, statue in works". WNST.net. Retrieved May 15, 2013.
  136. "NFL Network's A FOOTBALL LIFE to Return 9/12". tv.broadwayworld.com. Retrieved September 11, 2012.
  137. Gallo, DJ (January 2, 2008). "More grace and goodwill from the '72 Dolphins". ESPN Page 2. ESPN. Retrieved January 22, 2012.
  138. "Sayers, Lewis Launch S&L Racing". The Auto Channel. March 23, 2006. Retrieved December 16, 2009.
  139. "NFL star Ray Lewis turned away by NASCAR? Starts Champ Car team". NASCAR News. April 10, 2007. Archived from the original on July 19, 2012. Retrieved December 16, 2009.
  140. Hensley, Jamison (January 2, 2013). "Ray Lewis to retire after season". ESPN.com.
  141. Shaffer, Jonas. "Former Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis reportedly out as ESPN analyst".
  142. "FOX hires Ray Lewis". June 20, 2017.
  143. Hensley, Jamison (February 4, 2017). "Ray Lewis beats Tony Gonzalez in 'Lip Sync Battle' with familiar song". ESPN. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  144. "Media Advisory – North Avenue to be Renamed 'Ray Lewis Way'". Baltimore Ravens. March 10, 2010. Retrieved January 28, 2011.
  145. "Player Bios (A – O)" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 25, 2009. Retrieved September 28, 2010.
  146. "Player Season Finder Query Results". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 28, 2011.
  147. "Wes Welker's Wife Rips Ray Lewis -- He's a TERRIBLE PERSON". TMZ. January 21, 2013. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  148. "Ray Lewis' Girlfriend, Mother and Children". Player Wives. May 1, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2014.
  149. "Ray Lewis' son transfers to Coastal Carolina". Fox News. January 13, 2015. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  150. Prudente, Tim (August 18, 2016). "South Carolina grand jury indicts Ray Lewis' son on charge of criminal sexual conduct". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  151. Roman Stubbs (September 1, 2017). "Rayshad Lewis has 'the perfect setup' at Maryland, says Hall of Fame dad Ray Lewis". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  152. Shaffer, Jonas (August 10, 2016). "Ray Lewis tweets strange thing about Michael Phelps' medal count, deletes it". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved September 9, 2016.
  153. "After Nearly Dying, Michael Phelps Admits The Secret That Saved His Life And Made Him Swim Again". qpolitical.com. August 5, 2016. Archived from the original on September 16, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

Further reading