Brian Dawkins

Last updated

Brian Dawkins
Philadelphia Eagles Super Bowl LII Victory Parade (28393147219) (cropped).jpg
Dawkins in 2018
No. 20
Position: Safety
Personal information
Born: (1973-10-13) October 13, 1973 (age 49)
Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: William M. Raines
(Jacksonville, Florida)
College: Clemson
NFL Draft: 1996  / Round: 2 / Pick: 61
Career history
As a player:
As an administrator:
Career highlights and awards
As player

As administrator

Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:1,147
Sacks:26.0
Forced fumbles:36
Fumble recoveries:19
Interceptions:37
Total touchdowns:4
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Brian Patrick Dawkins Sr. (born October 13, 1973) is an American former football safety who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Clemson and was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft. In his last three seasons, he played for the Denver Broncos.

Contents

Regarded as one of the greatest safeties of all time, Dawkins was viewed as the leader of the Eagles' defense, named to nine Pro Bowls and five All-Pro first-teams during his career. He also made one Super Bowl appearance with the Eagles in XXXIX, which was played in his home city of Jacksonville, Florida. In addition to his playing career, Dawkins served the Eagles as an executive of football operations for player development from 2016 to 2018 and was with the organization when they won Super Bowl LII. He was inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2018. [1]

College career

Dawkins attended Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. A three-year starter at free safety for the Clemson Tigers football team, he finished his career with 247 tackles and 11 interceptions. He received first-team All-ACC Honors in 1995 and was selected by the Associated Press and Sporting News as a second-team All-American as a senior when his team-high six interceptions tied him for the conference lead. He was named the first-team strong safety on Clemson's all-centennial team in 1996 and was selected to their Athletic Hall of Fame in 2009. [2] [3] On January 11, 2013, Clemson University established the Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award to annually honor a former Clemson player for their performance on the field, contributions in leadership and community service. [4] [5]

Professional career

Philadelphia Eagles

The Philadelphia Eagles selected Dawkins in the second round (61st overall) of the 1996 NFL Draft. Dawkins was the fifth safety drafted in 1996. [6] The Philadelphia Eagles drafted Dawkins using a compensatory pick they received from the departure of Seth Joyner in free agency in 1994. [7]

1996

"He just took over the combine. You would've thought he was the captain of the DBs at the workout. He was ahead of everybody. He was doing everything. Which is the same thing I saw at Clemson." [8]

John Wooten
Philadelphia Eagles' Director of Scouting (1996)

Pre-draft measurables
HeightWeightArm lengthHand span 40-yard dash 10-yard split 20-yard shuttle Vertical jump Broad jump Bench press
5 ft 11+38 in
(1.81 m)
189 lb
(86 kg)
31+38 in
(0.80 m)
9 in
(0.23 m)
4.61 s1.61 s4.39 s35 in
(0.89 m)
10 ft 0 in
(3.05 m)
19 reps
All values from NFL Combine [9] [10]

Dawkins entered training camp slated as the backup free safety behind Eric Zomalt who earned the starting role after Greg Jackson departed in free agency. Head coach Ray Rhodes named Dawkins the backup free safety to start the regular season, behind Eric Zomalt. [11]

He made his professional regular-season debut in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener at the Washington Redskins and made one tackle in their 17–14 victory. The following week, Dawkins earned his first career start and collected a season-high 11 combined tackles during a 39–13 loss at the Green Bay Packers in Week 2. [12] On September 18, 1996, head coach Ray Rhodes officially named Dawkins the starting free safety, alongside strong safety Mike Zordich, after he surpassed Eric Zomalt on the depth chart. [13] Zomalt was subsequently released the following day. [11] On September 22, 1996, Dawkins recorded four combined tackles and made his first career interception during a 33–18 win at the Atlanta Falcons in Week 4. Dawkins made his first career interception off a pass by Falcons' backup quarterback Bobby Hebert, that was originally intended for wide receiver Bert Emanuel, and returned it for a 30-yard gain to seal the Eagles' victory in the fourth quarter. [14] In Week 5, he recorded eight combined tackles, forced a fumble, and made his first career sack in the Eagles' 23–19 loss to the Dallas Cowboys. Dawkins made his first career sack on Cowboys' quarterback Troy Aikman during the third quarter and also stripped the ball during the play. The ball was recovered by Dawkins' teammate Rhett Hall and returned for a 32-yard touchdown. [15] He finished his rookie season in 1996 with 75 combined tackles, three interceptions, a sack, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 13 starts. [16] The Philadelphia Eagles' defense allowed ranked 21st in the league overall, but allowed the sixth-fewest passing yards (2,979 yards) in 1996. [17]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished second in the NFC East with a 10–6 record and earned a wildcard berth. On December 29, 1996, Dawkins started in his first career playoff game and recorded six combined tackles as they lost 14–0 to the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Wild Card Game. [18] [12]

1997

Defensive coordinator Emmitt Thomas retained Dawkins and Mike Zordich as the starting safeties in 1997, along with cornerbacks Troy Vincent and Bobby Taylor. [19]

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg NFL Films Encore: Brian Dawkins

On September 28, 1997, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 28–19 loss at the Minnesota Vikings in Week 5. Dawkins was inactive for a Week 8 victory against the Arizona Cardinals due to an injury. [20] On December 7, 1997, Dawkins recorded seven combined tackles and returned an interception for his first career touchdown during the Eagles' 32–21 loss to the New York Giants in Week 15. Dawkins intercepted a pass by quarterback Danny Kanell, that was initially thrown to wide receiver Chris Calloway, and returned it for a 64-yard touchdown in the third quarter. [21] He finished the 1997 season with 75 combined tackles, three interceptions, and a touchdown in 15 games and 15 starts. [22] The Eagles' defense finished ranked 24th overall, but allowed the seventh-fewest passing yards (2,923 yards) in 1997. [23]

1998

Head coach Ray Rhodes elected to retain the starting secondary for the second consecutive season. [24] On December 7, 1998, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles and forced a fumble during a 31–21 loss to the New York Giants in Week 15. [25] Dawkins was sidelined for two games (Weeks 7–9) due to an injury. [26] Dawkins finished the 1998 season with 55 combined tackles, two interceptions, a sack, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 14 starts. [27] On December 28, 1998, the Philadelphia Eagles fired head coach Ray Rhodes after they finished with a 3–13 record in 1998. [28]

1999

On July 16, 1999, the Philadelphia Eagles signed Dawkins to a three-year, $1.27 million contract. [29]

“He's the hardest hitter on the team. He hits like a linebacker. He hurts people. He's knocked them out. He's knocked himself out. Shoot, he's knocked us out.” [8]

Jeremiah Trotter
former Philadelphia Eagles' linebacker

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Tim Hauck. [30] In Week 3, he made six combined tackles, forced a fumble, and made an interception during a 26–0 loss at the Buffalo Bills. Dawkins intercepted a pass by quarterback Doug Flutie, that was originally intended for wide receiver Peerless Price, in the second quarter. [31] His performance was his third consecutive game with an interception. In Week 9, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles in the Eagles' 33–7 loss at the Carolina Panthers. [32] He finished the 1999 season with 73 combined tackles, six forced fumbles, four interceptions, 1.5 sacks, and a touchdown in 14 games and 14 starts. [33] Dawkins flourished in his first season under defensive coordinator Jim Johnson and was subsequently named to the 2000 Pro Bowl, marking the first Pro Bowl selection of his career. [34] [13]

2000

In Week 11, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 26–23 victory at the Pittsburgh Steelers. The following week, he recorded seven combined tackles and made a season-high two sacks on Cardinals' quarterback Jake Plummer during the Eagles' 34–9 win at the Arizona Cardinals in Week 12. [35] Dawkins finished the 2000 season with a total of 75 combined tackles, four interceptions, two sacks, and a forced fumble in 13 games and 13 starts. [36]

2001

Head coach Andy Reid retained the core of the starting secondary as the starters, including Dawkins, Troy Vincent, and Bobby Taylor. Dawkins was paired with starting strong safety Damon Moore in 2001. [37]

Dawkins before a 2007 Eagles game Bdawk4.jpg
Dawkins before a 2007 Eagles game

He started in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener against the St. Louis Rams and collected a season-high eight combined tackles and deflected three passes in their 20–17 loss. On December 9, 2001, Dawkins tied his season-high of eight combined tackles, broke up two passes, forced a fumble, and returned a fumble recovery for a touchdown during the Eagles' 24–14 win against the San Diego Chargers in Week 13. Dawkins forced a fumble by Chargers' running back LaDainian Tomlinson in the first quarter and recovered the ball before returning it for a 49-yard touchdown. [38] On December 16, 2001, he made six solo tackles, two pass deflections, and intercepted two passes by quarterback Tony Banks in the Eagles' 20–6 victory against the Washington Redskins in Week 14. [39] He finished the season with 68 combined tackles (56 solo), 14 passes defensed, two interceptions, two forced fumbles, 1.5 sacks, and a touchdown in 15 games and 15 starts. [16] The Philadelphia Eagles defense ranked second in the league in 2001 and the secondary continued to have success under position coaches Leslie Frazier and Steve Spagnuolo. The secondary allowed the second-fewest yards in the league (2,928 yards) and allowed the second-fewest touchdown passes (13). [40] On January 3, 2002, Dawkins was one of five Philadelphia Eagles' players named to the 2002 Pro Bowl. [41]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with an 11–5 record. Head coach Andy Reid opted to rest Dawkins for the Eagles' Week 17 victory at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as they had already clinched a playoff berth. On January 12, 2002, Dawkins recorded two combined tackles, broke up two passes, and made an interception during a 31–0 win against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFC Wild Card Game. The following week, they defeated the Chicago Bears 33–19 in the NFC Divisional Round. On January 27, 2002, Dawkins recorded six solo tackles and deflected a pass as the Eagles lost 29–24 at the St. Louis Rams in the NFC Championship Game. [42]

2002

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Blaine Bishop. [43] The secondary also included returning cornerbacks Troy Vincent, Bobby Taylor, and Al Harris.

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Brian Dawkins' Quadrafecta Game (2002)
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Brian Dawkins' sets unreal record

On September 29, 2002, Dawkins recorded six combined tackles, a sack, two pass deflections, an interception, forced a fumble, and caught his first career touchdown pass during a 35–17 victory against the Houston Texans in Week 4. Dawkins' 57-yard touchdown reception came on a shuffle pass by running back Brian Mitchell during a fake punt in the third quarter. Dawkins became the first player in NFL history to make a sack, an interception, recover a fumble, and have a touchdown reception in a single game. [44] In Week 17, he collected a season-high ten combined tackles (seven solo) during a 10–7 loss at the New York Giants. Dawkins started all 16 games in 2002 and recorded 91 combined tackles (62 solo), nine passes defensed, five forced fumbles, three sacks, two interceptions, and one touchdown reception. [16] Jimmy Johnson's defense continued to have moderate success and finished the season ranked second behind the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Eagles' defense also ranked seventh in passing yards allowed (3,094 yards) and tied for seventh in passing touchdowns allowed (18). On January 14, 2003, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to play in the 2003 Pro Bowl. The Eagles' secondary had three players selected in 2003, including Troy Vincent and Bobby Taylor. [45]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with a 12–4 record and earned a first-round bye. On January 11, 2003, Dawkins made four combined tackles, a pass deflection, and an interception during a 20–6 victory against the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Divisional Round. They were eliminated from the playoffs the following week after losing 27–10 to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFC Championship Game. [46]

2003

On April 28, 2003, the Philadelphia Eagles signed Dawkins to a six-year, $43 million contract extension that included a signing bonus of $8 million. The contract extension was added to the one year Dawkins had remaining on his pre-existing contract. [47]

“If I am going to build a football team (from scratch), Dawkins is my free safety. Brian can play free safety, strong safety, and not miss a beat. He has the toughness to play strong and the cover ability as far as playing cornerback.” [47]

Jim Johnson
Philadelphia Eagles' Defensive coordinator (2003)

Dawkins remained the starting free safety in 2003 and was coached by defensive backs coach Steve Spagnuolo and assistant defensive backs coach Sean McDermott. Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starter to begin the regular season, along with starting strong safety Michael Lewis and cornerbacks Troy Vincent, Bobby Taylor, and Lito Sheppard. [48] He started in the Philadelphia Eagles' season-opener against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and collected a season-high nine combined tackles before exiting in the fourth quarter of their 17–0 loss due to a sprained ankle. His injury sidelined him for the next eight games (Weeks 2–10). [49] Dawkins was also inactive for the Eagles' Week 12 win against the New Orleans Saints due to a foot injury. [50] He finished the 2003 season with 35 combined tackles (28 solo), five pass deflections, an interception, and was credited with half a sack in seven games and seven starts. [16]

The Philadelphia Eagles finished atop their division with a 12–4 record. On January 11, 2004, Dawkins recorded eight solo tackles, deflected a pass, and returned an interception by Brett Favre for a 35-yard gain to set up a 31-yard field goal to help the Eagles win the NFC Divisional Round against the Green Bay Packers 20–17. [51] The following week, they lost to the Carolina Panthers 14–3 in the NFC Championship Game after Eagles' quarterback Donovan McNabb was intercepted three times by Panthers' safety Ricky Manning. [52]

2004

Dawkins and Michael Lewis returned as the starting safety duo and also played alongside cornerbacks Lito Sheppard and Sheldon Brown after Troy Vincent and Bobby Taylor departed in free agency. [53] On November 7, 2004, Dawkins collected a season-high nine solo tackles, broke up a pass, and made an interception during a 27–3 loss at the Pittsburgh Steelers. In Week 14, he made six combined tackles, a pass deflection, and an interception in the Eagles' 17–14 win at the Washington Redskins. [54] His interception continued his streak of three consecutive games with an interception. On December 23, 2004, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to play in the 2005 Pro Bowl, along with Michael Lewis and Lito Sheppard. [55] He finished the 2004 season with 69 combined tackles (64 solo), eight passes defensed, four interceptions, three sacks, and two forced fumbles in 15 games and 15 starts. Head coach Andy Reid elected to rest Dawkins for the Eagles' Week 17 matchup against the Cincinnati Bengals as they had already clinched a playoff berth.

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Dawkins gets clean hit on Alge Crumpler

The Philadelphia Eagles finished first in the NFC East with a 13–3 record and earned a first-round bye. The Eagles reached the NFC Championship Game after losing and being eliminated from the playoffs in three consecutive seasons. On January 23, 2005, Dawkins made a tackle, two pass deflections, and intercepted a pass by Falcons' quarterback Michael Vick during a 27–10 win against the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship Game. Dawkins played a key role and delivered a devastating hit on Falcons' tight end Alge Crumpler during the game. On February 6, 2005, Dawkins recorded five combined tackles as the Eagles lost 24–21 to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl. [54] This became Dawkins' first and only Super Bowl appearance.

2005

Dawkins in 2007 Bdawk.jpg
Dawkins in 2007

Defensive coordinator Jim Johnson retained the starting secondary in 2005. On December 11, 2005, Dawkins made four combined tackles, a season-high four pass deflections, a sack, and an interception in the Eagles' 26–23 loss to the New York Giants in Week 14. In Week 16, Dawkins collected a season-high eight combined tackles during a 27–21 loss at the Arizona Cardinals. [56] He started in all 16 games in 2005 and recorded 77 combined tackles (66 solo), a career-high 19 pass deflections, four forced fumbles, 3.5 sacks, and three interceptions. [16]

On January 26, 2006, it was announced that Dawkins was named to the 2006 Pro Bowl as a late-replacement for Chicago Bears' safety Mike Brown who was inactive due to an injury. [57]

2006

Head coach Andy Reid elected to retain Dawkins and Michael Lewis as the starting safety duo, along with cornerbacks Sheldon Brown and Lito Sheppard in 2006. In Week 6, Dawkins began playing alongside Sean Considine after he surpassed Michael Lewis on the depth chart and remained the starter for the rest of the season. [58] On December 17, 2006, Dawkins collected a season-high 12 combined tackles (11 solo), two pass deflections, and an interception during a 36–22 win at the New York Giants in Week 15. [59] On December 20, 2006, Dawkins was named to the 2007 Pro Bowl. Dawkins started in all 16 games in 2006 and recorded 93 combined tackles (71 solo), nine pass deflections, five forced fumbles, four pass interceptions, and a sack. [16]

2007

Dawkins returned as the starting free safety in 2007, alongside strong safety Sean Considine. On September 17, 2007, he recorded four solo tackles and deflected a pass before exiting the Eagles' 20–12 loss to the Washington Redskins on Monday Night Football due to an injury. Dawkins was sidelined for the next five games (Weeks 3–8) due to a neck injury he sustained against the Redskins. [60] In Week 10, he collected a season-high eight combined tackles and deflected a pass during a 33–25 victory at the Washington Redskins. He was also inactive for the Eagles' Week 17 win against the Buffalo Bills. [61] Dawkins finished the season with 37 combined tackles (28 solo), six pass deflections, and an interception in ten games and ten starts. [16]

2008

Head coach Andy Reid named Dawkins the starting free safety, alongside strong safety Quintin Mikell and cornerbacks Sheldon Brown and Asante Samuel. [62] In Week 5, he collected a season-high eight solo tackles and a sack during a 23–17 loss to the Washington Redskins. His sack on Redskins' quarterback Jason Campbell was the 20th sack of his career. He joined the 20/20 club after becoming the tenth player in NFL history to have 20 sacks and 20 interceptions in a career. His total at the time stood at 20 career sacks and 33 interceptions. He also broke fellow Jacksonville native and former Eagles' wide receiver Harold Carmichael's franchise record of 180 career games. He started in all 16 games in 2008 and recorded 75 combined tackles (64 solo), six pass deflections, three sacks, and an interception. [16]

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg 2008: Best of Brian Dawkins

He is also a member of the 30/30 club of players who have at least 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles. He and Charles Tillman are the only players to record at least 35 of each. (Forced fumbles have only been a recorded stat since 1991.) He finished his career with the Eagles starting 182 of 183 games, recording 898 tackles, 34 interceptions, 32 forced fumbles, and 26 sacks.

Denver Broncos

2009

On February 28, 2009, the Denver Broncos signed Dawkins to a five-year, $17 million contract that included $7.2 million guaranteed. He joined another teammate, Correll Buckhalter, who also signed with the Broncos. The contract also included a termination clause that permitted Dawkins to opt out of the contract after two years and receives an extra $1.8 million, virtually making the contract for two years and $9 million. Dawkins could have also earned an additional $10 million in performance incentives. [63] [64] [65] The Philadelphia Eagles and Dawkins were discussing a possible two-year contract before Dawkins received interest from the Denver Broncos.

Dawkins in 2009 with the Broncos Brian Dawkins.JPG
Dawkins in 2009 with the Broncos

Head coach Josh McDaniels named Dawkins the starting free safety to begin the regular season, alongside strong safety Renaldo Hill and cornerbacks Champ Bailey and Andre Goodman. [66] In Week 10, he collected a season-high 14 combined tackles (12 solo) during a 27–17 loss at the Washington Redskins. On December 13, 2009, Dawkins made ten combined tackles, two pass deflections, and intercepted two pass attempts by quarterback Peyton Manning during the Broncos' 28–16 loss at the Indianapolis Colts in Week 14. On December 27, 2009, Dawkins recorded eight combined tackles in his return to Lincoln Financial Field during a 30–27 loss at the Philadelphia Eagles in Week 16. [67] On December 29, 2009, it was announced that Dawkins was selected to the 2008 Pro Bowl. He started all 16 games in 2009 and recorded 116 combined tackles (95 solo), 11 pass deflections, two interceptions, and a forced fumble. [16]

2010

On January 18, 2010, the Denver Broncos mutually parted ways with defensive coordinator Mike Nolan. [68] They promoted linebackers coach Don Martindale to defensive coordinator. Head coach Josh McDaniels elected to retain the starting secondary in 2009. Dawkins was sidelined for two games (Weeks 6–7) due to a knee injury. He further aggravated his knee injury and was inactive for another three games (Weeks 13–15). [69] On December 7, 2009, the Denver Broncos fired head coach Josh McDaniels after they fell to a 3–9 record. [70] In Week 16, he collected a season-high nine combined tackles and deflected a pass during a 24–23 win against the Houston Texans. He finished the season with 66 combined tackles (55 solo), five pass deflections, two sacks, and an interception in 11 games and 11 starts. [16]

2011

Head coach John Fox named Dawkins the starting strong safety to begin the regular season, alongside free safety Rahim Moore. [71] He started in the Denver Broncos' season-opener against the Oakland Raiders and collected a season-high nine combined tackles in their 23–20 loss. On October 23, 2011, Dawkins made five combined tackles and two sacks during an 18–15 win at the Miami Dolphins in Week 7. He was sidelined for a game in Week 15 and Week 17 due to a reoccurring neck injury. [72] He finished the season with 51 combined tackles (38 solo), six pass deflections, three sacks, and a forced fumble in 14 games and 12 starts. [16] On January 19, 2012, it was announced that Dawkins would play in the 2012 Pro Bowl as a late injury replacement for Pittsburgh Steelers' safety Troy Polamalu. [73]

Retirement

After calling Coach John Fox on April 23, 2012, Dawkins announced via Twitter that he was retiring from the NFL. His reasoning was he wanted to retire while he was still healthy. He planned to stay in Colorado, and wanted to begin coaching high school football that fall. [74] [75]

On April 28, 2012, Dawkins alongside Jeffrey Lurie announced that he would sign a one-day contract, and retire as a member of the Philadelphia Eagles. [76] The Eagles retired Dawkins' number 20 in a ceremony at half-time of their September 30 game against the New York Giants. The Eagles have retired only nine players' jerseys in franchise history, which goes back more than 80 years. [77]

Hall of Fame

On February 4, 2018, it was announced that Dawkins was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and was one of five players selected. Dawkins joined Randy Moss, Brian Urlacher, Ray Lewis, and former Eagles teammate Terrell Owens. [78]

“He was the heartbeat of the defense.” [8]

Andy Reid
former Philadelphia Eagles' head coach

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Brian Dawkins' Hall of Fame speech
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg Brian Dawkins' Hall of Fame celebration

On August 4, 2018, Dawkins was officially inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and attended the ceremony at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio.

Legacy

Over the span of his career, Dawkins developed a reputation as a ball-hawking safety and became the unquestioned leader of the Philadelphia Eagles' defense. [79] He earned the nickname "Weapon X," a codename of Marvel character Wolverine, [74] the comic book superhero known for relentless aggression. He emerged as one of the top safeties in the league and was a defensive captain for the majority for both the Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos. [80] Dawkins is considered to be one of the top safeties in NFL history and was ranked as the fifth best safety in NFL history by NFL analyst Gil Brandt. [81]

External video
Nuvola apps kaboodle.svg NFL Legends: Dawkins' career highlights

As a captain and unquestioned leader, Dawkins has acted as a mentor to multiple players early in their career, including Al Harris, Chris Harris Jr., Jason Avant, and Quintin Mikell. [82] [83] Chris Harris Jr. credits Dawkins and Champ Bailey for urging the Denver Broncos' coaching staff to play him as an undrafted rookie after he showed promise and performed well in practice squad. [84]

Post-playing career

Dawkins in 2014 Brian Dawkins.jpg
Dawkins in 2014

On September 5, 2012, it was announced that Dawkins was hired as an NFL studio analyst by ESPN. [85]

On July 30, 2016, Dawkins returned to the Eagles to take a role on the team's scouting staff. On August 17, 2016, Dawkins was given the new role of Football Operations Executive to assist with player development. [86]

On May 22, 2018, Dawkins resigned as Football Operations Executive to seek other opportunities. [87]

NFL career statistics

YearTeamGamesTacklesInterceptionsFumbles
GPGSCmbSoloAstSckIntYdsAvgLngTDPDFFFR
1996 PHI 14137453211.034113.7300002
1997 PHI 15157461130.037625.3641000
1998 PHI 14145645111.023919.5300010
1999 PHI 16167858201.5412731.8671062
2000 PHI 13137154172.046215.5320012
2001 PHI 15156856121.52157.51501422
2002 PHI 16169562293.022713.5270954
2003 PHI 77352870.5100.000500
2004 PHI 1515696183.044010.0320821
2005 PHI 16167766113.53248.02401941
2006 PHI 16169371221.04389.5380950
2007 PHI 1010372890.0111.010600
2008 PHI 16167564113.012525.0250661
2009 DEN 161611695210.0200.0001113
2010 DEN 11116655112.01-2-2.0-20520
2011 DEN 14125138133.0000.000610
Career [88] 2242211,13189523626.03751313.9672983619

Personal life

Dawkins was born and raised in Jacksonville, Florida. In an interview, Dawkins talked about getting married: "I went to college at Clemson, and she (Connie) transferred there my second year, after one year at Jacksonville University. The night before going back to school our junior year, I asked her to marry me. Her grandfather gave us $100. Fifty-nine dollars for my ring and $41 for hers—and we eloped. We went to the Justice of the Peace." [89] He first saw his future wife, Connie Kerrin, in junior high school and began dating her while attending William M. Raines High School; she was a majorette while he played football and basketball. They graduated in 1992. [74] [89] In early 2007, Dawkins and his wife had twin daughters, Chonni and Cionni. [90] Both daughters were born two months premature but are now both perfectly healthy. Dawkins, with his wife, Connie, also have two other children, Brian Jr. and Brionni. [91] Brian Jr. is currently playing for the Clemson Tigers as a cornerback. After eloping in 1994, the couple had a wedding ceremony with family and friends at the Palm Beach Breakers Hotel in July 2009. [89]

Dawkins is a Christian. Dawkins has said that his Christian faith has helped against depression and suicidal thoughts. [92] During his NFL Hall of Fame speech, Dawkins said, “Thank you, Heavenly Father. Thank you, Heavenly Father, for blessing me with the sense to understand that I did not do everything by myself … You have guided me the whole way, orchestrated my life … You stayed faithful to me, and I cannot wait to see what You’re going to do with me next.” [93]

While with the Eagles, Dawkins had been a resident of Voorhees Township, New Jersey, but put his house there up for sale after joining the Broncos. [94]

After Dawkins signed with the Broncos in 2009, Dan Leone, an Eagles employee who was a gate chief at Lincoln Financial Field was fired by the Eagles after Leone posted messages on his Facebook page expressing his disappointment in the team. Dawkins announced that he would give his two allotted game tickets for the 2009 Eagles-Broncos game to Leone, saying, "I felt it would be a good thing, to reach out to that individual and just let him know how much I appreciate it." [95]

Dawkins' nephew, Dalyn Dawkins played for Colorado State and was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Tennessee Titans. [96] [97]

In April 2019, it was announced that Wawa and Dawkins teamed up to create a hoagie called "The Dawk". It has grilled chicken, Parmesan cheese, spinach, tomato, pickles, sweet peppers, and yellow mustard. It was available for a limited time and only at the Wawa in Dawkins's hometown of Jacksonville, Florida. [98]

Achievements

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Antrel Rolle</span> American football player (born 1982)

Antrel Rocelious Rolle is a former American football defensive back of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Miami, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American, and was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals eighth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft. Rolle also played for the Chicago Bears and New York Giants, winning Super Bowl XLVI with New York in 2011 over the New England Patriots.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Adrian Wilson (American football)</span> American football player and executive (born 1979)

Adrian Lemar Wilson is an American football executive and former safety who is the vice president of pro scouting for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Lynch (American football)</span> American football player and executive (born 1971)

John Terrence Lynch Jr. is an American football executive and former strong safety who is the current general manager of the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Stanford University, and was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the third round of the 1993 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eric Weddle</span> American football player (born 1985)

Eric Steven Weddle is an American former football safety who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 14 seasons. He played college football at Utah, where he was a consensus All-American, and was selected by the San Diego Chargers in the second round of the 2007 NFL Draft. During his nine seasons with the Chargers, Weddle received three Pro Bowl and two first-team All-Pro selections. Weddle spent his next three seasons as a member of the Baltimore Ravens, earning Pro Bowl honors in each and extending his total selections to six. He retired after playing for the Los Angeles Rams in 2019, but returned two years later to join the Rams on their playoff run, which culminated with a victory in Super Bowl LVI. Following the championship, he retired a second time.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Calais Campbell</span> American football player (born 1986)

Calais Mark Campbell is an American football defensive end for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Miami and was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kurt Coleman</span> American football player (born 1988)

Kurt Coleman is a former American football safety. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the seventh round of the 2010 NFL Draft. He played college football at Ohio State.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Malcolm Jenkins</span> American football player (born 1987)

Malcolm Jenkins is a former American football safety who played for 13 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, earning consensus All-American honors, and winning the Jim Thorpe Award as a senior. He was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the first round of the 2009 NFL Draft and played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 2014 to 2019.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nigel Bradham</span> American football player (born 1989)

Nigel Bradham is an American football linebacker who is a free agent. He played college football at Florida State University. He was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the fourth round of the 2012 NFL Draft, and played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 2016 to 2019.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ryan Kerrigan</span> American football player (born 1988)

Patrick Ryan Kerrigan is an American football coach and former outside linebacker and defensive end who is the assistant defensive line coach for the Washington Commanders of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American as a senior before being drafted by Washington in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jordan Hicks</span> American football player (born 1992)

Jordan Hicks is an American football middle linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Texas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cameron Jordan</span> American football player (born 1989)

Cameron Tyler Jordan is an American football defensive end for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at California, and was drafted by the Saints in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lavonte David</span> American football player (born 1990)

Lavonte Lamar David is an American football linebacker for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Nebraska, and was drafted by the Buccaneers in the second round of the 2012 NFL Draft. Since entering the NFL, David has been named to 3 All-Pro teams, 1 Pro Bowl appearance and won Super Bowl LV during the 2020 season, in a 31–9 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Byron Maxwell</span> American football player (born 1988)

Byron S. Maxwell is a former American football cornerback. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft, where he was a member of the Seahawks' defensive group known as the Legion of Boom. Maxwell has also played for the Philadelphia Eagles and Miami Dolphins. He played college football at Clemson.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Rodney McLeod</span> American football player (born 1990)

Rodney McLeod Jr. is an American football safety for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). McLeod played college football at Virginia and signed with the St. Louis Rams as an undrafted free agent in 2012. He has also played for the Philadelphia Eagles, and won a Super Bowl with them in 2017.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Darius Slay</span> American football player (born 1991)

Darius Demetrius Slay Jr. is an American football cornerback for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Mississippi State and was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Micah Hyde (American football)</span> American football player (born 1990)

Micah Richmond Hyde is an American football free safety for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Iowa and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fifth round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Anthony Harris (safety)</span> American football player (born 1991)

Anthony Harris is an American football free safety for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Virginia, and was signed by the Minnesota Vikings as an undrafted free agent in 2015.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shaquil Barrett</span> American football player (born 1992)

Shaquil Akeem "Shaq" Barrett is an American football outside linebacker for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Nebraska-Omaha before transferring to Colorado State University, and was signed by the Denver Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2014. After five seasons with the Broncos, including winning Super Bowl 50, Barrett signed with the Buccaneers. His level of play increased, making the Pro Bowl and All-Pro teams in 2019 after leading the league in sacks, and in 2021 won Super Bowl LV.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eddie Jackson (safety)</span> American football player (born 1993)

Eddie Jackson is an American football free safety for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Keanu Neal</span> American football player (born 1995)

Keanu Neal is an American football safety for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the National Football League (NFL). He was selected by the Atlanta Falcons with the 17th overall pick in the 2016 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida.

References

  1. ""Selection Saturday" Results In, Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2018 | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  2. Brian Dawkins Is Making Bone Crushing Hits In The NFL Archived December 7, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  3. Dawkins, Kriese head Clemson Hall of Fame picks [ permanent dead link ]
  4. "Clemson Institutes Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award". Clemson University Athletics. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved January 12, 2013.
  5. "Brian Dawkins To Be First Recipient of the Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award at Clemson". Comcast Sportsnet Philadelphia. Archived from the original on January 15, 2013. Retrieved January 12, 2013.
  6. "Brian Patrick Dawkins". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved December 21, 2012.
  7. "1996 NFL Draft Transactions". prosportstransactions.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  8. 1 2 3 "Brian Dawkins: 50 things to know about the former Eagle and soon-to-be Hall of Famer". Barkowit, Ed. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  9. "Dane Brugler on Twitter".
  10. "Brian Dawkins Combine Results". nflcombineresults.com. Retrieved April 24, 2021.
  11. 1 2 Patton, Steve (September 19, 1996). "Dawkins arrives and Zomalt exits". Reading Eagle . Retrieved June 16, 2011.
  12. 1 2 "NFL #20 Brian Dawkins (1996)". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  13. 1 2 "NFL Draft rewind: Eagles draft future Hall Of Fame safety Brian Dawkins". insidetheiggles.com. April 22, 2018. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  14. "Philadelphia Eagles at Atlanta Falcons - September 22nd, 1996". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  15. "Dallas Cowboys at Philadelphia Eagles - September 30th, 1996". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (career)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  17. "1996 NFL Opposition & Defensive Statistics". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  18. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (1996)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  19. "1997 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  20. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (1997)". NFL.com . Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  21. "New York Giants at Philadelphia Eagles - December 7th, 1997". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  22. "NFL #20 Brian Dawkins -ESPN (1997)". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  23. "1997 NFL Opposition & Defensive Statistics". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  24. "1998 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  25. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (1998)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  26. "Scouting Report". dailypress.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  27. "NFL #20 Brian Dawkins -ESPN (1998)". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  28. "Eagles Fire Head Coach Ray Rhodes". apnews.com. December 28, 1998. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  29. "Spotrac.com: Brian Dawkins contract". spotrac.com. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  30. "1999 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  31. "Philadelphia Eagles at Buffalo Bills - September 26th, 1999". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  32. "NFL #20 Brian Dawkins -ESPN (1999)". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  33. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (1999)". NFL.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  34. Schwartz, Bryn (November 23, 2008). "Weapon X: Is Brian Dawkins Worthy of the Hall of Fame?". bleacherreport.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  35. "Philadelphia Eagles at Arizona Cardinals - November 19th, 2000". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  36. "Explain Dc motor starters- two point, three point, four point starters)". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on August 5, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  37. "2002 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  38. "San Diego Chargers at Philadelphia Eagles - December 9th, 2001". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  39. "Washington Redskins at Philadelphia Eagles - December 16th, 2001". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  40. "2001 NFL Opposition & Defensive Statistics". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  41. "Five Eagles named to Pro Bowl". pottsmerc.com. January 3, 2002. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  42. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2001)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  43. "2002 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  44. "Today in Philly Sports History: Dawkins Goes Nuts, 2002". nbcsports.com. September 29, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  45. Mullin, John (January 14, 2003). "Eagles boast Fab 4". articles.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  46. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2002)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  47. 1 2 Pasquerelli, Len (April 28, 2003). "Dawkins signs contract extension". espncdn.com. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  48. "2003 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  49. "Safety Dawkins has sprained foot". ESPN.com. September 10, 2003. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  50. "QB tosses for 259 yards, 2 TDs". ESPN.com. November 23, 2003. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  51. "Eagles changed after loss to Panthers in 2004 NFC Championship Game". ESPN.com. January 14, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  52. "Carolina Corrals McNabb, Philly". newsok.com. January 19, 2004. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  53. "2004 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  54. 1 2 "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2004)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  55. "2005 NFL Pro Bowl Roster". desertnews.com. December 23, 2004. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  56. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2005)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  57. "Brian Dawkins Named to Pro Bowl". nbcsports.com. January 26, 2006. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  58. "Pro Bowler to bowled over? Eagles' Lewis struggling". espn.com. Associated Press. October 17, 2006. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  59. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2006)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  60. "Eagles secondary without Pro Bowlers Dawkins, Sheppard". NFL.com. September 23, 2007. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  61. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2007)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  62. "2005 Philadelphia Eagles Starters, Roster, & Players". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  63. "Broncos add to defense, ink-free agent Dawkins". March 2, 2009. Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  64. "Official Blog of the National Football League" . Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  65. "Official Site of the Denver Broncos". Archived from the original on February 11, 2005. Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  66. "Ourlads.com: Denver Broncos Depth Chart: 09/06/2009". Ourlads.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  67. "NFL Player stats: Brian Dawkins (2009)". NFL.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  68. "Broncos part ways with Defensive coordinator Mike Nolan". denverpost.com. January 16, 2010. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  69. "Rotoworld.com: Brian Dawkins". rotoworld.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  70. "Josh McDaniels fired; RB coach tabbed". ESPN.com. December 7, 2011. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  71. "Ourlads.com: Denver Broncos Depth Chart: 09/04/2011". Ourlads.com. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  72. "Brian Dawkins Injury: Could Neck Injury End Dawkins' Career?". denver.sbnation.com. Archived from the original on February 16, 2014. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  73. "Brian Dawkins adds to Pro Bowl total". ESPN.com. January 19, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2018.
  74. 1 2 3 Stapleton, Arnie (April 23, 2012). "Jacksonville native Brian Dawkins decides 16 seasons is sweet enough". Florida Times-Union. Retrieved April 24, 2012.
  75. "Denver Broncos Brian Dawkins tweets he will retire from NFL". NFL.COM. Retrieved April 24, 2012.
  76. CSNPHILLY.COM STAFF (April 27, 2012). "Dawkins to sign one-day contract, retire as Eagle". Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved April 28, 2012.
  77. Davis, Nate (September 30, 2012). "Brian Dawkins does pregame dance for Eagles before getting No. 20 jersey retired". USA Today. Retrieved October 23, 2012.
  78. Legwold, Jeff (February 4, 2018). "Ray Lewis, Randy Moss, Terrell Owens, Brian Dawkins, Brian Urlacher among 2018 HOF class". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  79. "Dawkins doesn't miss a trick, or a scoring chance". The Philadelphia Inquirer . October 25, 1999. Retrieved August 2, 2014.
  80. Heath, John. "Denver's Brian Dawkins: An Ageless Wolverine". BroncoTalk. Archived from the original on January 28, 2012. Retrieved April 24, 2012.
  81. Brandt, Gil (July 5, 2017). "Gil Brandt's greatest NFL safeties of all time". NFL.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  82. "Jason Avant: It was a Blessing Being Around Brian Dawkins". 973espn.com. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  83. "Current And Former Eagles React To Brian Dawkins' Retirement". bleedinggreennation.com. April 23, 2012. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  84. "Denver Broncos: Brian Dawkins' impact was enormous". predominantlyorange.com. August 4, 2018. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  85. Nwulu, Mac (September 5, 2012). "Nine-time Pro Bowl Safety Brian Dawkins Joins ESPN as NFL Studio Analyst". espnmediazone.com. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  86. Zangaro, Dave (August 16, 2016). "Eagles hire Brian Dawkins as Football Operations Executive". NBC Sports. Retrieved February 2, 2018.
  87. "Brian Dawkins stepping down from full-time role with Eagles".
  88. "Brian Dawkins, SS". NFL.com. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  89. 1 2 3 "Brian Dawkins' Wife Connie Kerrin". November 27th, 2010. Baller Wives. Archived from the original on December 2, 2010. Retrieved April 24, 2012.
  90. "News - Around the NFL". NFL.com . Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  91. "Apps - Access My Library - Gale" . Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  92. "Brian Dawkins: Christianity has helped me deal with depression". July 30, 2018. Retrieved October 16, 2020.
  93. Benjamin, Cody (August 6, 2018). "Brian Dawkins: 'Heavenly Father' guided my Hall of Fame career". Sports Spectrum. Retrieved October 16, 2020.
  94. Klein, Michael. "Buy Brian Dawkins' house", The Philadelphia Inquirer , July 16, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Seven-time Pro Bowler and former Eagle Brian Dawkins are with the Denver Broncos now, and so his house in Voorhees is on the market."
  95. Dawkins Gives Fired Worker 2 Tickets ESPN, April 5, 2009
  96. "Dalyn Dawkins transferring to Colorado State football from Purdue" . Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  97. "Proud Nephew: Titans RB Dalyn Dawkins Treasures Advice from HOF Uncle Brian Dawkins" . Retrieved May 26, 2022.
  98. "Brian Dawkins and Wawa team up to make special 'Dawk' hoagie | RSN".
  99. "Brian Dawkins Stats - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 6, 2018.
  100. "NFL Most Forced Fumbles | Playerfilter". www.playerfilter.com. Archived from the original on September 30, 2016.