Dan Fortmann

Last updated

Dan Fortmann
Dan Fortmann.jpg
No. 21
Position: Guard
Linebacker
Personal information
Born:(1916-04-11)April 11, 1916
Pearl River, New York, U.S.
Died:May 23, 1995(1995-05-23) (aged 79)
Los Alamitos, California, U.S.
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: Pearl River
College: Colgate (1933–1935)
NFL draft: 1936  / Round: 9 / Pick: 78
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:86
Games started:79
Interceptions:8
Interception yards:54
Defensive touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Daniel John Fortmann (April 11, 1916 – May 23, 1995) was an American football guard and linebacker who played for the Chicago Bears in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Colgate Red Raiders. Playing for Chicago from 1936 to 1943, he was selected as an All-Pro for seven consecutive years from 1937 to 1943. He was the Bears' team captain starting in 1940 and led the team to NFL championships in 1940, 1941, and 1943.

Contents

Fortmann was the line coach for the Pittsburgh Panthers football team in 1944 and in 1945 served in the United States Navy in the Pacific Ocean theater of World War II. He engaged in a medical practice in Southern California from 1946 to 1984 and was the team physician for the Los Angeles Rams from 1947 to 1963. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1965. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1983.

Early years

Fortmann was born in 1916 in Pearl River, New York. [1] His father, Bernhard Gerhart Fortmann, was a New York native and salesman of butter and eggs. His mother, Emma Margaret Doscher, was also a New York native. [2]

Fortmann attended Pearl River High School, where he earned 12 varsity letters in sports and was the valedictorian of his class. [3] [4]

Colgate

At age 16, Fortmann enrolled at Colgate University, where he played football, playing as a halfback as a freshman before moving to guard and becoming a starter in 1934 and 1935. [3] [5] Colgate football coach Andrew Kerr called Fortmann "the best player I ever handled." [4] After the 1935 season, he was selected to play in multiple all-star games, including the East–West Shrine Game (January 1, 1937) and the Chicago College All-Star Game (September 1, 1937). [4] Dick Hanley, who coached Fortmann in the Shrine Game, praised Fortmann as a great blocker and urged Chicago Bears owner George Halas to sign Fortmann. [5]

In addition to playing football, Fortmann was also an outstanding student at Colgate. He received straight A's as a pre-med student and graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors at age 19. [4] He was also president of his senior class and a member of the Delta Upsilon (DU) fraternity. [5]

Professional football

At age 19, Fortmann was selected by the Chicago Bears in the ninth and final round (78th overall pick) of the 1936 NFL draft. [6] After being drafted by the Bears, Fortmann was unsure whether he should attend medical school or play professional football. Bears owner George Halas persuaded Fortmann that he could do both and advanced funds to Fortmann for medical school. [5] [7] After speaking with Halas, Fortmann signed with the Bears in May 1936. At the time, he was the youngest person ever signed by an NFL team. [5]

Due to his medical school obligations, Fortmann missed most of the Bears' sessions in his first four years with the team. [4] In 1941, during his medical internship, he described pro football as "just the means to an end", the end being practicing medicine as a surgeon. [8] Yet, Fortmann became fiercely loyal to Halas, saying: "Halas is the salt of the earth. There is nobody I admire and respect more than him." [9]

Fortmann remained with the Bears for his entire professional football career, lasting for eight years from 1936 to 1943. He appeared in 86 games for the Bears. By 1939, Fortmann had established himself as one of the best most valuable players in the NFL. In voting by NFL coaches for the 1939 All-Pro Team, Fortmann received 37 points, the second-highest individual vote of any player. [10]

Fortmann was team captain of the Bears starting in 1940. As team captain, he led the Bears to back-to-back NFL championships in 1940 and 1941 with records of 8–3 and 10–1. After the 1940 season, Fortmann was rated as the best lineman in the NFL. The United Press called him "the heart and soul" of the Bears' ground attack that "rolled up a vast amount of yardage overland." [11]

In the 1940 NFL Championship Game, the Bears defeated the Washington Redskins by a 73–0 score. Fortman later cited the 1940 championship game as proof of Halas' skill as a "master of psychology." [9] The Bears had lost to the Redskins three weeks earlier, and Fortmann recalled that Halas kept reminding the Bears of that defeat every day, and when the team took the field for the championship game, "they were keyed the highest emotionally I ever saw them." [9]

In August 1942, quarterback Bob Snyder called Fortmann "a perfect football player" and "the most important man on the Bear squad." [12] The 1942 Bears compiled a perfect 11–0 record in the regular season and won the Western Division championship, but lost to the Washington Redskins in the 1942 NFL Championship Game.

Fortmann announced his retirement from the NFL in January 1943, [13] but was persuaded to return for the 1943 season. He continued to practice medicine at Pittsburgh's Presbyterian Hospital during the 1943 season, flying in on Saturdays to play with the Bears on Sundays. [14] [15] The 1943 Bears compiled an 8–1–1 record and defeated the Washington Redskins in the 1943 NFL Championship Game, which proved to be Fortmann's last game as an NFL player. He announced his retirement five days after the championship game. [16]

Honors and awards

Fortmann received numerous honors and awards during and after his football career, including the following:

Later years and family

Fortmann was married to Mary Van Halteren in a ceremony at East Lansing, Michigan, on March 19, 1938. [21] [22] They had two sons, Thomas and Stephen. [3]

Fortmann enrolled at Rush Medical School at the University of Chicago, where he studied medicine while playing for the Bears. He obtained his medical degree in 1940. He interned at Harper Hospital in Detroit and completed his surgical training at the University of Pittsburgh. [4] [8]

In the fall of 1944, he served as the line coach for the University of Pittsburgh Panthers football team. [23]

In February 1945, Fortmann was commissioned as a lieutenant in the United States Navy. [24] In April 1945, he was assigned to an attack transport ship in the South Pacific. [23] He served in the Navy Medical Corps on a hospital ship in the Pacific theater. [4]

In 1946, Fortmann was licensed to practice medicine in California and began practicing on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. [4] [25] [26] [27] He worked as a surgeon at St. Joseph Hospital in Burbank, California, from 1948 until 1984. He became the hospital's chief of staff in 1965. He also served as the team physician for the Los Angeles Rams from 1947 to 1963. Fortmann and his family in Toluca Lake and/or Burbank until 1974 when they moved to Pasadena. [4] [28]

Fortmann was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1983 and, in 1988, began living at the John Douglas French Center, a facility in Los Alamitos, California, specializing in the care of Alzheimer's patients. He died at French Center in May 1995 at age 79. [28] [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Danny Fortmann Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
  2. Census entry for Bernhard Fortmann and family. Son Daniel, born in New York, age 4-1/2. Census Place: Orangetown, Rockland, New York; Roll: T625_1258; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 219; Image: 922. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Obituary". Los Angeles Times. June 2, 1995. p. A31 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Art Hopper (January 22, 1965). "Pearl River's Finest, Dan Fortmann, Hall of Famer". The Rockland County Journal-News. p. 21 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 "Fortmann, Star Colgate Guard, Signed By Bears". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 22, 1936. p. 33 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  6. "1936 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2023-03-20.
  7. Stanley Grosshandler (1970). "Pro Football's Doctor Alumni" (PDF). Coffin Corner. Pro Football Researchers. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 28, 2012.
  8. 1 2 John N. Sabo (January 30, 1941). "An Ambition That Wouldn't Be Lost: Fame and adulation have failed to make Danny Fortmann forget that, above all, he wants to be a surgeon". Detroit Free Press. p. 13 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  9. 1 2 3 4 "Hall of Famers diagnosis: Hutson the Best -- Dr. Fortmann". Los Angeles Times. January 24, 1965. p. C7 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  10. "Four Giants Win Honors". Los Angeles Times. December 15, 1939. p. II-13 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  11. "Fortmann, Baugh Top Pro All-Star: Named Outstanding Among Linemen And Backs". The Pittsburgh Press. December 3, 1940. p. 28 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  12. Edward Prell (August 25, 1942). "Fortmann, Musso to Lead Bears for 3d Straight Year". Chicago Tribune. pp. 17–18 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  13. "Danny Fortmann To Assist Shaughnessy At Pitt". The Pittsburgh Press. January 31, 1943. p. 2-1 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  14. "Fortmann Will Operate Sunday in Farewell to Pro Grid". Detroit Free Press. December 23, 1943. p. 10 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  15. Jack Sell (December 30, 1943). "Dr. Fortmann Starred For Bears Sans Drills". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. pp. 11, 13 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  16. "Danny Fortmann To Quit Football". Arizona Republic. January 1, 1944. p. 9 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  17. "Dan Fortmann Bio". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  18. "All-1930's NFL Team Selected". The Baltimore Sun. August 27, 1969. p. C5 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  19. "Danny Fortmann Member Biography". College Football Hall of Fame . Football Foundation. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
  20. "NFL Alumni surprise Cosell with honor". News/Sun Sentinel. March 22, 1986. p. 10C.
  21. "Miss Mary VanHalteren Becomes Bride of Chicagoan in Ceremony Here". Lansing State Journal. March 20, 1938. p. 14 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  22. Marriage License issued to Daniel J. Fortmann and Mary A. Van Halteren. Ancestry.com. Michigan, Marriage Records, 1867-1952 [database on-line].
  23. 1 2 "Dan Fortmann Is on Duty With Navy in the Pacific". The Journal News. April 17, 1945. p. 1 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  24. "Dr. Danny Fortmann Commissioned By Navy". The Daily Republican. February 28, 1945. p. 2 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  25. Daniel John Fortmann licensed in September 1946. California State Archives; Sacramento, California; Board of Medical Examiners Record of Applications, 1939-1953. Source Information: Ancestry.com.
  26. California State Archives; Sacramento, California; Directory, 1950. Source Information: Ancestry.com. California, Occupational Licenses, Registers, and Directories, 1876-1969 [database on-line].
  27. California, Occupational Licenses, Registers, and Directories, 1876-1969 [database on-line].
  28. 1 2 "Dan Fortmann, 79, Bears guard in the Hall of Fame". Chicago Tribune. May 26, 1995. pp. 2–12 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg