Starostwo

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Starosta, by Kanuty Rusiecki, 1823 Starosta. Starosta (K. Rusiecki, 1823).jpg
Starosta, by Kanuty Rusiecki, 1823

Starostwo (literally "eldership") [lower-alpha 1] is an administrative unit established from the 14th century in the Polish Crown and later in the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth until the partitions of Poland in 1795. Starostwos were established in the crown lands (królewszczyzna). The term is also used in modern Poland.

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Starosta

Each starostwo was administered by an official known as starosta. The starosta would receive the office from the king and would keep it until the end of his life. It usually provided a significant income for the starosta. His deputy was variously known as podstarosta, podstarości, burgrabia, włodarz, or surrogator. [1]

There were several types of starosta:

Powiat starosta

When Poland regained independence in 1918 (until the beginning of the World War II in 1939) and in 1944–1950, the starosta was the head of powiat (county) administration, subordinate to the voivode.

Since the local government reforms, which came into effect on 1 January 1999, the starosta is the head of the powiat executive board (zarząd powiatu), and the head of the powiat starostwo  [ pl ] (part of the powiat administration), being elected by the powiat council (rada powiatu).

Notes

  1. Polish: Starostwo, staˈrɔstfɔ; Lithuanian: seniūnija; Belarusian: староства, romanized: starostva; German: Starostei

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