Thompson-Ray House

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Thompson-Ray House

Thompson-Ray House.jpg

Thompson-Ray House, July 2012
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Location 407 E. Main St., Gas City, Indiana
Coordinates 40°29′23″N85°36′31″W / 40.48972°N 85.60861°W / 40.48972; -85.60861 Coordinates: 40°29′23″N85°36′31″W / 40.48972°N 85.60861°W / 40.48972; -85.60861
Area less than one acre
Built 1902 (1902)-1906
Built by Waldron, John H.
Architect Elder, Hiram
Architectural style Late Victorian, Free Classic
NRHP reference # 09000756 [1]
Added to NRHP September 24, 2009

Thompson-Ray House is a historic home located at Gas City, Grant County, Indiana. It was built between 1902 and 1906, and is a 2 1/2-story, Late Victorian Free Classic style brick and stone dwelling. It has a cruciform plan and gable roof. It features porches with multiple classical columns and a porte cochere. [2] :5

Gas City, Indiana City in Indiana, United States

Gas City is a city in Grant County, Indiana, along the Mississinewa River. The population was 5,965 at the 2010 census.

Grant County, Indiana County in the United States

Grant County is a county located in central Indiana in the United States Midwest. At the time of the 2010 census, the population was 70,061. The county seat is Marion. Important paleontological discoveries, dating from the Pliocene epoch, have been made at the Pipe Creek Sinkhole in Grant County.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2016-04-01.Note: This includes Dann Keiser (July 2008). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thompson-Ray House" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-04-01. and Accompanying photographs.