Thornhurst Addition

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Thornhurst Addition

Thornhurst Addition.jpg

Thornhurst Addition, January 2012
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Location Bounded by 650 to 742 W Main St, Thornhurst Dr and Rogers Ct, Carmel, Indiana
Coordinates 39°58′44″N86°08′16″W / 39.97889°N 86.13778°W / 39.97889; -86.13778 Coordinates: 39°58′44″N86°08′16″W / 39.97889°N 86.13778°W / 39.97889; -86.13778
Area 11 acres (4.5 ha)
Built 1956 (1956)-1971
Architect Shull, Avriel
Architectural style Modern Movement
MPS Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960 MPS
NRHP reference # 10000378 [1]
Added to NRHP June 24, 2010

Thornhurst Addition is a national historic district located at Carmel, Hamilton County, Indiana. It encompasses 21 contributing buildings and 1 contributing site in a predominantly residential section of Carmel. It developed between about 1956 and 1971, and includes notable examples of Modern Movement style architecture designed by Avriel Shull (1931-1976). It includes homes of post and beam construction with huge aluminium window expanses, slate or stone entry floors, and clerestory windows. [2]

Carmel, Indiana City in Indiana, United States

Carmel is a fast-growing suburban edge city on the north side of Indianapolis. Home to 92,198 residents, the city spans 47 square miles (120 km2) across Clay Township in Hamilton County, Indiana, and is bordered by the White River to the east; Michigan Road and the county line to the west; 96th Street to the south and 146th Street to the north. Although Carmel had one of the nation's first stoplights, it is now known as the "Roundabout Capital of the U.S." because it has more roundabouts than any city in America.

Hamilton County, Indiana County in the United States

Hamilton County is a county in the U.S. state of Indiana. Census 2010 recorded a population of 274,569. The county seat is Noblesville.

Modern architecture broad type of architecture

Modern architecture, or modernist architecture was based upon new and innovative technologies of construction, particularly the use of glass, steel and reinforced concrete; the idea that form should follow function; an embrace of minimalism; and a rejection of ornament. It emerged in the first half of the 20th century and became dominant after World War II until the 1980s, when it was gradually replaced as the principal style for institutional and corporate buildings by postmodern architecture.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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Avriel Shull was an American architectural designer/builder and interior decorator from Carmel, Hamilton County, Indiana, whose career spanned from the 1950s until her death in 1976. An energetic and imaginative woman, she is best known for her mid-century modern architectural designs, which are especially unusual given the predominantly traditional tastes of mid-century Indiana. Most of Shull's projects were single-family homes around Hamilton and Marion counties in central Indiana, most notably the homes in Christie's Thornhurst Addition in Carmel, Indiana. Shull also designed a number of custom homes in Indianapolis's toniest suburbs, in other Indiana towns, and in other states. In the 1970s Shull began selling house plans in do-it-yourself home building periodicals, which were sold in the United States and Canada. Shull also designed apartment buildings and commercial/industrial properties. Her first major project outside of Indiana was a public library in Elkins, West Virginia. She also did designs for restaurants, including one in California and one in Carmel, Indiana.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2016-04-01.Note: This includes Connie J. Ziegler (December 2008). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thornhurst Addition" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-04-01. and Accompanying photographs.