Thornycroft type destroyer leader

Last updated

HMS Keppel docked in the East India Dock, London WWII IWM A 15039.jpg
HMS Keppel
Class overview
Builders: Thornycroft
Operators:Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg  Royal Navy
Preceded by: Admiralty V-class leader
Succeeded by: Admiralty type leader
Built: 1916–1925
In commission: 1917–1945
Planned: 7
Completed: 5
Cancelled: 2
Lost: 1
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer leader
Displacement:
  • 1,480 tons standard
  • 2,009 tons full load
Length: 329 ft (100 m) o/a
Beam: 31 ft 6 in (9.60 m)
Draught: 12 ft 6 in (3.81 m)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 38 kn (70 km/h) (trials)
  • 36 kn (67 km/h) (service)
Range: 500 tons oil
Complement: 164
Armament:

The Thornycroft type leader or Shakespeare class were a class of five destroyer leaders designed by John I. Thornycroft & Company and built by them at Woolston, Southampton for the Royal Navy towards the end of World War I. They were named after historical naval leaders. Only Shakespeare and Spenser were completed in time for wartime service. The other three were completed after the war, Broke and Keppel after being towed to Royal dockyards for completion, and two further ships - Saunders and Spragge - were cancelled. The function of a leader was to carry the flag staff of a destroyer flotilla, therefore they were enlarged to carry additional crew, offices and signalling equipment, allowing a fifth gun to be carried. These ships were very similar to the Admiralty type leader, but had broad, slab-sided funnels characteristic of Thornycroft designs.

Contents

The design was used as the basis for several ships built for foreign navies in the 1920s.

Ships

The first two ships to this design were ordered under the War Emergency Programme, in April 1916, and the third - Wallace - in April 1917:

Four more were ordered from Thornycroft in April 1918, but with the end of the War the first pair were completed by HM Dockyards and the second pair were cancelled; the second ship was initially named Rooke, but was renamed Broke in April 1921. Two more vessels were ordered at the same time, to be built to this design by Cammell Laird, but it was subsequently decided to build these instead to the Admiralty type flotilla leader design and in the event both were subsequently cancelled:

See also

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Shakespeare class flotilla leader at Wikimedia Commons

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