Thunderdelve Mountain

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Thunderdelve Mountain
XS2 TSR9157 Thunderdelve Mountain.jpg
Code XS2
TSR Product Code 9157
Authors William Carlson
First published 1985
Linked modules
X1, X2, X3, X4, X5, X6, X7, X8, X9, X10, X11, X12, X13, XL1, XSOLO, XS2

Thunderdelve Mountain is an adventure module published in 1985 for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

Adventure (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) pre-packaged book or box set in the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, an adventure or module is a pre-packaged book or box set that helps the Dungeon Master manage the plot or story of a game. The term adventure is currently used by the game's publisher Wizards of the Coast.

<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i> fantasy role-playing board game

Dungeons & Dragons is a fantasy tabletop role-playing game (RPG) originally designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. It was first published in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules, Inc. (TSR). The game has been published by Wizards of the Coast since 1997. It was derived from miniature wargames, with a variation of the 1971 game Chainmail serving as the initial rule system. D&D's publication is commonly recognized as the beginning of modern role-playing games and the role-playing game industry.

Fantasy genre of literature, film, television and other artforms

Fantasy is a genre of speculative fiction set in a fictional universe, often without any locations, events, or people referencing the real world. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels and video games.

Contents

Plot summary

Thunderdelve Mountain is a solo scenario for a midlevel dwarf player character, and involves a mission to defeat a red dragon in its own lair. [1] The module includes new monsters, and instructions for running the scenario as an adventure for a group. [1]

Dwarf (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>) people from Dungeons & Dragons

A dwarf, in the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy roleplaying game, is a humanoid race, one of the primary races available for player characters. The idea for the D&D dwarf comes from European mythologies and J. R. R. Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings (1954-1955), and has been used in D&D and its predecessor Chainmail since the early 1970s. Variations from the standard dwarf archetype of a short and stout demihuman are commonly called subraces, of which there are more than a dozen across many different rule sets and campaign settings.

Player character fictional character in a role-playing or video game that can be played or controlled by a real-world person

A player character is a fictional character in a role-playing game or video game whose actions are directly controlled by a player of the game rather than the rules of the game. The characters that are not controlled by a player are called non-player characters (NPCs). The actions of non-player characters are typically handled by the game itself in video games, or according to rules followed by a gamemaster refereeing tabletop role-playing games. The player character functions as a fictional, alternate body for the player controlling the character.

Dragon (<i>Dungeons & Dragons</i>)

In the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) fantasy role-playing game, dragons are an iconic type of monstrous creature used as adversaries or, less commonly, allies of player characters. As a group, D&D dragons are loosely based upon dragons from a wide range of fictional and mythological sources.

Publication history

XS2 Thunderdelve Mountain was written by William Carlson, with a cover by Larry Elmore, and was published by TSR in 1985 as a 40-page booklet with an outer folder. [1]

Larry Elmore American artist

Larry Elmore is an American fantasy artist whose work includes creating illustrations for video games, comics, magazines, and fantasy books. His list of work includes illustrations for Dungeons & Dragons, Dragonlance, and his own comic strip series SnarfQuest. He is author of the book Reflections of Myth.

Reception

Reviews

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Schick, Lawrence (1991). Heroic Worlds: A History and Guide to Role-Playing Games. Prometheus Books. p. 150. ISBN   0-87975-653-5.