Tide, Oregon

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Tide, Oregon
Tide, Oregon.jpg
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Tide
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Tide
Coordinates: 44°03′59″N123°50′24″W / 44.06639°N 123.84000°W / 44.06639; -123.84000 Coordinates: 44°03′59″N123°50′24″W / 44.06639°N 123.84000°W / 44.06639; -123.84000
Country United States
State Oregon
County Lane
Elevation
66 ft (20 m)
Time zone UTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
97453
GNIS feature ID1151210

Tide is an unincorporated community in Lane County, Oregon, United States, [1] on Oregon Route 36, about six miles (10 km) east of its junction with Oregon Route 126 in Mapleton, near the Siuslaw River.

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References

  1. "Tide". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved October 5, 2011.