Tidestromia lanuginosa

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Tidestromia lanuginosa
Tidestromia lanuginosa.jpg
Status TNC G5.svg
Secure  (NatureServe)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Amaranthaceae
Genus: Tidestromia
Species:T. lanuginosa
Binomial name
Tidestromia lanuginosa
(Nutt.) Standl.

Tidestromia lanuginosa is a species of flowering plant in the amaranth family known by the common name woolly tidestromia. [1]

Amaranthaceae family of plants

Amaranthaceae is a family of flowering plants commonly known as the amaranth family, in reference to its type genus Amaranthus. It includes the former goosefoot family Chenopodiaceae and contains about 165 genera and 2,040 species, making it the most species-rich lineage within its parent order, Caryophyllales.

Contents

Range and habitat

It is native to the southwestern United States and northern to central Mexico, where it grows in many types of habitat, including desert canyons and woodlands, desert riparian zones, desert and coastal scrub, beaches, and disturbed habitat such as roadsides.

Desert riparian

Desert riparian is a North American desert vegetation type occurring in the bottoms of canyons and drainages that have water at or near the surface most of the year. It is contrasted with the desert dry wash vegetation type in which water at or near the surface is lacking most of the year. The visual character is of large, lush green trees surrounded by dry desert vegetation and soil coloration. The area may be in a patch surrounding a spring (oasis), or in a strand following the course of water flow. Over 80% of known desert wildlife species use desert riparian areas. Common dominant species include Fremont cottonwood, Arizona ash, arroyo willow, Goodding's willow, red willow, California fan palm, and invasive species such as salt cedar, giant reed, and Russian olive. Salt cedar is particularly causing problems for this ecosystem because it is able to extract water more efficiently than cottonwoods and willows. Many noninvasive non-native species may also be found because springs and surface water areas in the desert often were old homesites where such species were intentionally planted, such as elm, black locust, and assorted fruit trees.

Beach Area of loose particles at the edge of the sea or other body of water

A beach is a landform alongside a body of water which consists of loose particles. The particles composing a beach are typically made from rock, such as sand, gravel, shingle, pebbles. The particles can also be biological in origin, such as mollusc shells or coralline algae.

Growth pattern

It is an annual herb producing a sprawling red, yellow, or greenish stem up to 50 centimeters long, or occasionally longer, to form clumps or patches on the ground.

Leaves and stem

The leaves are quite variable in shape, being rounded to lance-shaped and sometimes asymmetrical. They are gray-green in color due to a thin to dense layer of hairs. The hairs gradually wear off on the upper surface revealing the green below. [2] Stems are red and are also covered with white hairs. [2]

Flowers and fruit

Flowers occur in the leaf axils in clusters of a few, or solitary. The flower lacks petals but has tiny sepals around a ring of five stamens.

Sepal part of a calyx

A sepal is a part of the flower of angiosperms. Usually green, sepals typically function as protection for the flower in bud, and often as support for the petals when in bloom. The term sepalum was coined by Noël Martin Joseph de Necker in 1790, and derived from the Greek σκεπη (skepi), a covering.

Stamen floral organ

The stamen is the pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower. Collectively the stamens form the androecium.

The plant blooms July to October. [2]

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References

  1. "Tidestromia lanuginosa". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA . Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 Mojave Desert Wildflowers, Pam Mackay, 2nd Ed. 2013, p. 259