Torilis arvensis

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Torilis arvensis
Torilis arvensis 2005.07.21 14.27.51-p7210042.jpg
Fruits
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Torilis
Species:
T. arvensis
Binomial name
Torilis arvensis

Torilis arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names spreading hedgeparsley, [1] tall sock-destroyer [2] and common hedge parsley. [3] It is native to parts of Europe and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitat, especially disturbed areas. It is an annual herb producing a slender, branching, rough-haired stem up to a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of lance-shaped leaflets up to 6 centimeters long each. The leaflet is divided or deeply cut into segments or teeth. The inflorescence is a wide open compound umbel of flower clusters on long, slender rays. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is 3 to 5 millimeters long and is coated in straight or curving prickles.

Related Research Articles

<i>Torilis</i> Genus of flowering plants in the family Apiaceae

Torilis is a genus of plants in the family Apiaceae which are known generally as the hedge parsleys. They are native to Eurasia and North Africa but have been introduced to other continents. T. arvensis is quite widespread in North America but is facing population decline in the UK.

<i>Cymopterus globosus</i> Species of flowering plant

Cymopterus globosus is a species of flowering plant in the carrot family known by the common name globe springparsley. This plant is native to the sandy flats extending between eastern California and Utah in the western United States. It is a low, stemless plant with leaves parallel to or lying flat on the ground. The green-gray parsley-shaped leaves are divided into several leaflets, which are further divided into neatly pointed segments. One or more tall purple or red-brown peduncles hold an inflorescence which is a spherical umbel densely packed with white or pinkish-purple flowers. They may be held in pairs atop the peduncle, and are often heavy enough to bend the peduncle to the ground.

<i>Calendula arvensis</i> Species of flowering plant

Calendula arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name field marigold. It is native to central and southern Europe, and it is known across the globe as an introduced species.

<i>Cytisus multiflorus</i> Species of legume

Cytisus multiflorus is a species of legume known by the common names white broom, white spanishbroom and Portuguese broom.

<i>Acmispon cytisoides</i> Species of legume

Acmispon cytisoides, synonyms Lotus benthamii and Syrmatium cytisoides, is a species of legume native to California. It is known by the common names Bentham's broom and Bentham's deerweed. It is endemic to central California, where it occurs along the Central Coast and into the coastal mountain ranges. It grows in oceanside habitat and inland on slopes and in canyons. It is a mat-forming or spreading perennial herb lined with leaves each made up of a few oval leaflike leaflets up to 12 mm long. The inflorescence bears up to 10 dull pinkish dark-veined flowers, each just under 1 cm long.

Hosackia incana, synonym Lotus incanus, is a species of legume native to California. It is known by the common name woolly bird's-foot trefoil. It is endemic to the Sierra Nevada of California, where it grows in forests and other mountain habitat.

Arvensis, a Latin adjective meaning in the fields, may refer to:

<i>Psorothamnus polydenius</i> Species of legume

Psorothamnus polydenius is a species of flowering plant in the legume family known by the common names Nevada dalea and Nevada indigobush. It is native to the deserts of the southwestern United States from the Mojave Desert in California to Utah.

<i>Ranunculus andersonii</i> Species of buttercup

Ranunculus andersonii is a species of buttercup known by the common name Anderson's buttercup. It is native to the western United States, including the Great Basin and surrounding regions, where it grows in sagebrush, woodlands, and other habitat. It is a perennial herb producing a basal rosette of thick leaves which are each divided into three double-lobed leaflets at the end of a petiole. The inflorescence arises from the rosette on an erect, leafless stalk usually no more than 20 centimeters tall. It bears one flower with usually five white or red-tinged petals each up to 2 centimeters long with white or pinkish sepals at the base. At the center of the flower are many yellow stamens and pistils. The fruit is an achene, borne in a spherical cluster of 14 or more. It was named after Charles Lewis Anderson by Asa Gray.

<i>Torilis japonica</i> Species of flowering plant

Torilis japonica, the erect hedgeparsley, upright hedge-parsley or Japanese hedge parsley, is a plant species in the genus Torilis. Japanese hedge parsley is considered both an annual and biennial plant in the carrot family depending on the biogeographical location. This means Japanese hedge parsley can complete its life cycle in either one or two growing seasons depending on habitat. Japanese hedge parsley is typically found in areas with disturbed soils, pastures, margins, open woodland, near waste sites, or right-of-way habitats. It can withstand a variety of habitats, thriving in partial and full shaded areas, but also withstanding habitats with full sunlight penetration. It is considered an aggressive invasive species in North America; invading a wide range of habitats due to its environmental tolerance and tendency to outcompete native vegetation. This species is considered a threat in several areas that causes problems relating to overall environmental health and stability. Aside from its environmental implications, T. japonica has potential to fight several cancers through a terpene it produces called Torilin, extracted from its fruits.

<i>Sanicula tuberosa</i> Species of flowering plant

Sanicula tuberosa is a species of flowering plant in the family [[Apiaceae|parsley family] known by the common name turkey pea. It is native to western North America from Oregon through California to Baja California, where it can be found in many types of habitat, including chaparral, forests, and woodlands. It is variable in appearance. In general, it is a perennial herb producing a slender stem up to 80 centimeters long from a small, spherical tuber no more than 2 centimeters wide. The leaves are compound, divided into usually three leaflets which are smooth or deeply cut into lobes. The herbage is green to purple in color. The inflorescence is made up of one or more heads of bisexual and male-only flowers with tiny, curving, yellow petals. The fruits are 1 or 2 millimeters long and covered in bumpy tubercles.

<i>Sphenosciadium</i>

Sphenosciadium is a monotypic genus of flowering plants in the carrot family containing the single species Sphenosciadium capitellatum, which is known by the common names woollyhead parsnip, ranger's buttons, button parsley, and swamp white heads.

<i>Stachys arvensis</i> Species of flowering plant

Stachys arvensis is a species of flowering plant in the mint family known by the common names field woundwort and staggerweed. It is native to Europe, Western Asia, and North Africa. It is known on other continents as an introduced species and widespread weed.

Stephanomeria paniculata is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names tufted wirelettuce and stiff-branched wirelettuce. It is native to the northwestern United States, where it grows in many types of habitat, including disturbed areas. It is an annual or biennial herb producing a slender, erect stem with stiff, widely spreading branches toward the top. It is hairless. The leaves are mostly located in a basal rosette, the largest reaching 10 centimeters long. Smaller, linear leaves occur along the upper stem. Flower heads occur singly or in small clusters along the stiff branches. Each head contains 4 to 6 ray florets, each with an elongated tube and a pinkish or lavender ligule up to 1.4 centimeters long. The fruit is an achene tipped with a spreading cluster of long, white pappus bristles.

<i>Thermopsis gracilis</i> Species of legume

Thermopsis gracilis is a species of flowering plant in the legume family known by the common name slender goldenbanner.

<i>Torilis nodosa</i> Species of flowering plant

Torilis nodosa is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae known by the common names knotted hedgeparsley and short sock-destroyer. It is native to parts of Europe, especially the Mediterranean Basin and it is known elsewhere, such as North America, as an introduced species and a common weed. It grows in many types of habitat, particularly disturbed areas. It is an annual herb producing a hairy stem up to half a meter in maximum height. The alternately arranged leaves are each divided into several pairs of smooth-edged lance-shaped or linear leaflets. The inflorescence is a dense compound umbel of flower clusters on very short rays, often appearing like a cluster. Each flower has five petals which are unequal in size and are white with a pinkish or reddish tinge. Each greenish or pinkish fruit is about 3 millimeters long and is coated in long prickles.

Townsendia leptotes is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names common Townsend daisy and slender townsendia. It is native to the western United States, where it grows in the alpine climates of high mountain ranges from California to Montana to New Mexico.

Trifolium barbigerum is a species of clover known by the common name bearded clover.

Trifolium bolanderi is a species of clover known by the common names Bolander's clover and parasol clover.

<i>Trifolium microcephalum</i> Species of legume

Trifolium microcephalum is a species of clover known by the common names smallhead clover and small-headed clover.

References

  1. "Torilis arvensis". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA . Retrieved 11 December 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Lincoln Constance & Margriet Wetherwax (2014). "Torilis arvensis". Jepson eFlora. Jepson Flora Project. Retrieved 11 December 2015.
  3. "Common Hedge Parsley (Torilis arvensis)". www.illinoiswildflowers.info. Retrieved 2018-12-22.