Wauna, Oregon

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Wauna, Oregon
Unincorporated community

Wauna mill from Bradley State Scenic Viewpoint - Wauna Oregon.jpg

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Wauna
Location within the state of Oregon
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Wauna
Wauna (the US)
Coordinates: 46°9′6″N123°24′9″W / 46.15167°N 123.40250°W / 46.15167; -123.40250 Coordinates: 46°9′6″N123°24′9″W / 46.15167°N 123.40250°W / 46.15167; -123.40250
Country United States
State Oregon
County Clatsop
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
  Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 97016
Area code(s) 503 and 971

Wauna is an unincorporated community on the Columbia River in Clatsop County, Oregon, United States. According to Oregon Geographic Names, it names a Native American mythological being associated with the Columbia River. There was a post office in Wauna from January 21, 1911 to circa 1980. Wauna is best known as the home of a Georgia-Pacific paper mill.

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Columbia River River in the Pacific Northwest of the United States

The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. It flows northwest and then south into the US state of Washington, then turns west to form most of the border between Washington and the state of Oregon before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. The river is 1,243 miles (2,000 km) long, and its largest tributary is the Snake River. Its drainage basin is roughly the size of France and extends into seven US states and a Canadian province. The fourth-largest river in the United States by volume, the Columbia has the greatest flow of any North American river entering the Pacific.

Clatsop County, Oregon County in the United States

Clatsop County is a county in the U.S. state of Oregon. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,039. The county seat is Astoria. The county is named for the Clatsop tribe of Native Americans, who lived along the coast of the Pacific Ocean prior to European settlement.


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