Wheelchair fencing

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Romain Noble (L) v Tian Jianquan (R) in the final of the epee A event in the 2013 World Fencing Championships Final EMS-A 2013 Wheelchair Fencing WCH t201328.jpg
Romain Noble (L) v Tian Jianquan (R) in the final of the épée A event in the 2013 World Fencing Championships

Wheelchair fencing is a version of fencing for athletes with a disability. Wheelchair fencing is governed by the International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation that is a federation of the International Paralympic Committee, and is one of the sports in the Summer Paralympic Games. The Paralympic games take place every 4 years in different countries.

Contents

Classification

Events

World Championships
EditionYearHostDates
12010 Flag of France.svg Paris 12 - 20 November
22011 Flag of Italy.svg Catania 8 - 15 October
32013 Flag of Hungary.svg Budapest 7 - 12 August
42015 Flag of Hungary.svg Eger 17 -24 September
52017 Flag of Italy.svg Rome 6 -12 November
62019 Flag of South Korea.svg Cheongju 17 - 23 September
European Championships
EditionYearHostDates
12011 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sheffield 13 - 19 July
22014 Flag of France.svg Strasbourg 7 - 12 June
32016 Flag of Italy.svg Casale Monferrato 17 - 22 May
42018 Flag of Italy.svg Terni 17 - 23 September

See also

Related Research Articles

International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation international disabled sports governing body

The International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) is an international sports organisation that governs sports for athletes with physical impairments.

Paralympic sports

The Paralympic sports comprise all the sports contested in the Summer and Winter Paralympic Games. As of 2016, the Summer Paralympics included 22 sports and 526 medal events, and the Winter Paralympics include 5 sports and disciplines and about 72 events. The number and kinds of events may change from one Paralympic Games to another.

Summer Paralympic Games international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete

The Summer Paralympic Games or the Games of the Paralympiad, are an international multi-sport event where athletes with physical disabilities compete. This includes athletes with mobility disabilities, amputations, blindness, and cerebral palsy. The Paralympic Games are held every four years, organized by the International Paralympic Committee. Medals are awarded in each event, with gold medals for first place, silver for second and bronze for third, a tradition that the Olympic Games started in 1904.

1 point player is a disability sport classification for wheelchair basketball. It is for people who have significant loss of trunk control.

2 point player

2 point player and 2.5 point player is a disability sport classification for wheelchair basketball. People in this class have partial trunk control when making forward motions. The class includes people with T8-L1 paraplegia, post-polio paralysis and amputations. People in this class handle the ball less than higher-point players. They have some stability issues on court, and may hold their wheel when trying to one hand grab rebounds.

3 point player is a disability sport classification for wheelchair basketball. People in this class have good forward and backward trunk movement but poor to no sideways trunk movement. The class includes people with L2-L4 paraplegia and amputations. Amputees are put into this class generally if they have hip disarticulations or hip abductions. Players in this class can generally rebound balls that are over their heads, but they can have some issues with balance during lateral rebounds.

4.5 point player

4.5 point player is a disability sport classification for wheelchair basketball. Players in this class tend to have normal trunk movement, few problems with side to side movements, and ability to reach to the side of their chair. Players generally have a below knee amputation, or some other partial single leg dysfunction. This classification is for players with minimal levels of disability. In some places, there is a class beyond this called 5 point player for players with no disabilities.

Disability sports classification is a system that allows for fair competition between people with different types of disabilities.

ARW2 is a Paralympic archery classification.

Wheelchair fencing classification is the classification system for wheelchair fencing which is governed by the IWAS. People with physical disabilities are eligible to compete included people with physical disabilities. Classification for national competitions is done through the local national Paralympic committee.

Para-equestrian classification is a system for para-equestrian sport is a graded system based on the degree of physical or visual disability and handled at the international level by the FEI. The sport has eligible classifications for people with physical and vision disabilities. Groups of eligible riders include The sport is open to competitors with impaired muscle power, athetosis, impaired passive range of movement, hypertonia, limb deficiency, ataxia, leg length difference, short stature, and vision impairment. They are grouped into five different classes to allow fair competition. These classes are Grade Ia, Grade Ib, Grade II, Grade III, and Grade IV. The para-equestrian classification does not consider the gender of the rider, as equestrines compete in mixed gender competitions.

Class A is a Paralympic wheelchair fencing classification.

CP3 is a disability sport classification specific to cerebral palsy. In many sports, it is grouped inside other classifications to allow people with cerebral palsy to compete against people with other different disabilities but the same level of functionality. Compared higher number CP classes, they have increased issues with head movement and trunk function. They tend to use wheelchairs on a daily basis though they may be ambulant with the use of assistive devices.

F1, also T1 and SP1, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level C6. Historically, it was known as 1A Complete. People in this class have no sitting balance, and are tetraplegics. They may be able to perform limited actions with one hand. They lack sitting balance, and have limited head control and respiratory endurance. The process for classification into this class has a medical and functional classification process. This process is often sport specific.

F2, also T2 and SP2, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level C7. Historically, it was known as 1B Complete, 1A Incomplete. People in this class are often tetraplegics. Their impairment effects the use of their hands and lower arm, and they can use a wheelchair using their own power.

F3, also T3 and SP3, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level C8. Historically, it was known as 1C Complete, and 1B Incomplete. F3 sportspeople have functional issues related to the muscles in their throwing arm, though they have enough control over their fingers to grip a throwing implement normally. They have no functional trunk control.

F4, also T4 and SP4, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level T1- T7. Historically, it was known as 1C Incomplete, 2 Complete, or Upper 3 Complete. People in this class have normal upper limb function, and functional issues with muscles below the nipple line.

F5, also SP5, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level T8 - L1. Historically, it was known as Lower 3, or Upper 4. People in this class have some trunk function and good sitting balance. They have problems with hip function, that reduces their ability to rotate their spines.

F7, also SP7, is a wheelchair sport classification that corresponds to the neurological level S1- S2. Historically, it has been referred to as Lower 5. It is characterized by people having their lower limb muscles strength and function impacted. People in the SP7 class generally have good sitting balance and some trunk movement backwards and forwards. One side may be stronger than the other.

Wheelchair sport classification is a system designed to allow fair competition between people of different disabilities, and minimize the impact of a person's specific disability on the outcome of a competition. Wheelchair sports is associated with spinal cord injuries, and includes a number of different types of disabilities including paraplegia, quadriplegia, muscular dystrophy, post-polio syndrome and spina bifida. The disability must meet minimal body function impairment requirements. Wheelchair sport and sport for people with spinal cord injuries is often based on the location of lesions on the spinal cord and their association with physical disability and functionality.

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