Zhang Guoliang

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Zhang Guoliang
Nickname(s)Big head sheep
Born1810
Gaoyao, Zhaoqing, Guangdong, China
DiedApril 1860 (aged 49–50)
Danyang, Jiangsu, China
Allegiance Flag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg Qing Dynasty
Years of service18491861
RankMajor, 1849
Lieutenant General, 1853
Captain General (湖南提督), 1855
Field Marshal (江南提督), 1857
Unit Army group
Commands held Jiangnan DaYing
Battles/wars First rout the Army Group Jiangnan (1853–1856)
Second rout the Army Group Jiangnan (1857–1860)
Awardsroyal BATURU (Manchu: the Brave) in 1853
Imperial yellow jacket (黃馬褂) in 1857
Baron Yiyong of the First Class, Order of succession (勇毅一等男爵, 世襲)

Zhang Guoliang (traditional Chinese :張國樑; simplified Chinese :张国梁; pinyin :Zhāng Guóliáng; 1810 – April 1860), born in Guangdong, was a Field Marshal for the Qing dynasty. He was born in Gaoyao, Zhaoqing, Guangdong, China, although Qing state that he is from Meixian, Guangdong. He was originally a bandit in Guangxi but later joined the Qing Army. He raised the Green Standard Army by 250,000 to fight against the Taiping Rebellion in the second rout the Army Group Jiangnan in 1860 and was defeated by Li Xiucheng. Zhang served as a minister to the emperor and a vice commander of Army Group Jiangnan until his death by suicide. Zeng Guofan praised Zhang and said he was Jiangnan's "Great Wall of China."

Contents

Early life

When the Battle of Nanjing (1853) began, Zhang accepted a SOS order from Nanjing, he and his 15,000 men were the first troops to arrive and save Nanjing.

Nickname

Zhang Guoliang was nicknamed Big head sheep (goose) as a member of the Tiandihui gang and was a bandit with Luo Dagang (羅大綱). He was said to have the habit of hiding a dagger in his boot.

Recovery of Zhenjiang

In 1856, Zhang GuoLiang led his army in the recovery of Zhenjiang, which had been occupied by Taiping for five years. The Emperor rewarded Zhang with the Imperial yellow jacket and promoted him to First Class Senior General.

Death

In April 1860, Zhang was defeated and led his remaining 20,000 soldiers in retreat to Danyang. He left the city on horseback and drowned while trying to escape. His body was not found immediately; it was eventually buried in the Nanjing Pantheon.

Awards

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Events from the year 1860 in China.

Events from the year 1856 in China.

References

Government offices
Preceded by
Her zweng
Chief commander of Jiangnan DaYing
18561860
Succeeded by
Huang Esen