1990 UK Athletics Championships

Last updated
1990 UK Athletics Championships
Host city Cardiff, Wales
Venue Cardiff Athletics Stadium
Old leckwith athletics stad.jpg
LevelSenior
TypeOutdoor
1989
1991


The 1990 UK Athletics Championships was the national championship in outdoor track and field for the United Kingdom held at Cardiff Athletics Stadium, Cardiff. It was the first time that the event was held in the Welsh capital. Strong winds affected several of the sprint races and jumps on the programme. A women's triple jump was contested for the first time.

Contents

It was the fourteenth edition of the competition limited to British athletes only, launched as an alternative to the AAA Championships, which was open to foreign competitors. However, due to the fact that the calibre of national competition remained greater at the AAA event, the UK Championships this year were not considered the principal national championship event by some statisticians, such as the National Union of Track Statisticians (NUTS). Many of the athletes below also competed at the 1990 AAA Championships. [1] [2]

Racewalker Ian McCombie and javelin thrower Steve Backley both won a third straight UK title at the event. Other men to defend titles that year were Colin Jackson (110 m hurdles), Paul Edwards (shot put) and Paul Head (hammer throw). Three women repeated their 1989 victories: Kay Morley (100 m hurdles), Jackie McKernan (discus) and Sharon Gibson (javelin).Myrtle Augee defeated Judy Oakes in the women's shot put to break her rival's winning streak dating back to 1984. No athletes won multiple titles in Cardiff, though champions Sallyanne Short, Phylis Smith, Alison Wyeth and Michelle Griffith all reached the podium in two events. [1]

The main international track and field competition for the United Kingdom that year was the 1990 European Athletics Championships. Britain's men had a highly successful performance there, with Linford Christie, Roger Black, Colin Jackson, Kriss Akabusi, and Steve Backley all going from UK champion to European champion. The 800 m UK champion David Sharpe was also a silver medallist behind his teammate Tom McKean. [3] [4] The four countries of the United Kingdom competed separately at the Commonwealth Games that year as well. UK champions Christie, Akabusi, Backley, Diane Edwards and Myrtle Augee all won gold for England, while Jackson and Morley made it a men's and women's sprint hurdles double for Wales. [5] [6]

Medal summary

Men

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 metres
(wind: +2.2 m/s)
Linford Christie 10.13 w Jason Livingston 10.31 w Dave Clark 10.39 w
200 metres Ade Mafe 21.13 Dave Clark 21.14 Michael Rosswess 21.26
400 metres Roger Black 45.63 Paul Sanders 46.75 Mark Richardson 46.88
800 metres David Sharpe 1:51.46 Martin Steele 1:51.63 Kevin McKay 1:51.63
1500 metres Neil Horsfield 3:48.39 Rob Whalley 3:49.07 Andrew Geddes 3:49.18
3000 metres Geoff Turnbull 8:11.35 Robert Denmark 8:11.90 Tom Hanlon 8:12.71
5000 metres Simon Mugglestone 13:43.7 Jon Richards 13:46.3 Deon McNeilly 13:47.7
110 m hurdles Colin Jackson 13.10 David Nelson 13.62 Nigel Walker 13.77
400 m hurdles Kriss Akabusi 51.50 Philip Harries 52.49 Martin Briggs 53.03
3000 metres steeplechase Ken Penney 8:50.90 Tom Buckner 8:54.84 Spencer Newport 8:56.55
10,000 m walk Ian McCombie 41:16.00 Mark Easton 41:35.39 Andrew Penn 44:10.67
High jump Dalton Grant 2.25 m Geoff Parsons 2.20 m Brendan Reilly 2.20 m
Pole vault Andy Ashurst 5.30 m Mike Edwards 5.20 m Dean Mellor 5.00 m
Long jump Kevin Liddington 7.62 m Wayne Griffith 7.58w m John Shepherd 7.50 m
Triple jump Francis Agyepong 16.06 m Jonathan Edwards 15.49 m Joe Sweeney 15.22 m
Shot put Paul Edwards 18.57 m Matt Simson 18.52 m Steve Whyte 17.24 m
Discus throw Paul Mardle 57.02 m Abi Ekoku 56.46 m Steve Casey 54.46 m
Hammer throw Paul Head 71.64 m Mick Jones 68.24 m Jason Byrne 67.98 m
Javelin throw Steve Backley 88.46 m Myles Cottrell 72.54 m Gary Jenson 72.20 m

Women

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 metres
(wind: +4.6 m/s)
Sallyanne Short 11.36 w Phylis Smith 11.40 w Helen Miles 11.45 w
200 metres
(wind: +2.6 m/s)
Phylis Smith 23.97 w Louise Stuart 24.00 w Sallyanne Short 24.04 w
400 metres Diane Edwards 54.32 Sandra Douglas 55.02 Pat Beckford 55.49
800 metres Helen Thorpe 2:05.52 Mary Kitson 2:06.10 Sally Wheeler 2:07.36
1500 metres Alison Wyeth 4:20.40 Lisa York 4:21.04 Debbie Gunning 4:21.24
3000 metres Andrea Wallace 9:08.1 Sonia McGeorge 9:08.7 Alison Wyeth 9:08.9
100 m hurdles
(wind: +4.6 m/s)
Kay Morley 13.16 w Sam Farquharson 13.33 w Wendy Jeal 13.40 w
400 m hurdles Clare Sugden 57.52 Gowry Retchakan 58.23 Julie Vine 59.82
5000 m walk Betty Sworowski 22:31.59 Lisa Langford 22:42.47 Julie Drake 23:03.24
High jump Julia Bennett 1.84 m Debbie Marti 1.81 m Louise Gittens 1.78 m
Long jump Mary Berkeley 6.17 m Joanne Wise 6.08 m Michelle Griffith 5.90 m
Triple jump Michelle Griffith 12.94 m w Evette Finikin 12.87 m w Karen Hambrook 11.82 m w
Shot put Myrtle Augee 19.03 m Judy Oakes 18.77 m Yvonne Hanson-Nortey 16.09 m
Discus throw Jackie McKernan 55.36 m Janette Picton 52.64 m Sharon Andrews 52.60 m
Javelin throw Sharon Gibson 58.32 m Mandy Liverton 57.84 m Fatima Whitbread 51.50 m

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References

  1. 1 2 UK Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-02-25.
  2. AAA WAAA and National Championships Medalists. NUTS. Retrieved 2018-02-25.
  3. European Championships (Men). GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-06.
  4. European Championships (Women). GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-06.
  5. Commonwealth Games (Men). GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-06.
  6. Commonwealth Games (Women). GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-06.