AAA Indoor Championships

Last updated
AAA Indoor Championships
Athletics pictogram.svg
Sport Indoor track and field
Founded1935
Ceased2006
Country England/United Kingdom

The AAA Indoor Championships was an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Amateur Athletic Association of England. It was the foremost indoor domestic athletics event during its lifetime.

Track and field Sport involving running, jumping and throwing disciplines

Track and field is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing. The name is derived from where the sport takes place, a running track and a grass field for the throwing and some of the jumping events. Track and field is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking.

The Amateur Athletic Association of England or AAA is the oldest national governing body for athletics in the world, having been established on 24 April 1880. Historically it effectively oversaw athletics throughout Britain. Now it supports regional athletic clubs and works to develop amateur and youth category athletics in England alone. This includes the English Cross Country Association.

Sport of athletics Sports involving running, jumping, throwing, and walking

Athletics is a collection of sporting events that involve competitive running, jumping, throwing, and walking. The most common types of athletics competitions are track and field, road running, cross country running, and race walking.

Contents

The event was first held in 1935, following the construction of an adequate venue in Wembley Arena in London for the 1934 British Empire Games. The first iteration of the competition lasted for five editions and featured around nine men's indoor track and field events and six for women. The onset of World War II meant the competition was not held in 1940. The second iteration of the competition began in 1962, returning to its Wembley venue. The championships had a long residency at RAF Cosford indoor arena from 1965 to 1991, then from 1992 to 2001 at the National Indoor Arena in Birmingham. The final few editions for held at the English Institute of Sport, Sheffield. [1] The event ceased in 2006, being replaced by the UK Athletics-organised British Indoor Athletics Championships.

Wembley Arena An indoor arena in Wembley, London

Wembley Arena is an indoor arena adjacent to Wembley Stadium in Wembley, London. Used for music, comedy, family entertainment and sport, the 12,500-seat facility is London's second-largest indoor arena after The O2 Arena, and the ninth-largest in the United Kingdom.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

1934 British Empire Games 2nd edition of the British Empire Games

The 1934 British Empire Games were the second of what is now known as the Commonwealth Games, held in England, from 4–11 August 1934. The host city was London, with the main venue at Wembley Park, although the track cycling events were in Manchester. Seventeen national teams took part, including the Irish Free State.

Though organised by the English governing body, it was open to all athletes from the United Kingdom, and also to overseas athletes. (Most of the foreign athletes who competed were Irish or UK-based.) It served as the de facto British Championships, given the absence of such a competition during its history. It was typically held over two days over a weekend in February.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea separates Great Britain and Ireland. The United Kingdom's 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

It was among the earliest and most significant annual indoor track and field competitions, being preceded only by the AAU Indoor Track and Field Championships in the United States (established in 1907). The restarting of the AAA Indoor Championships in 1962 came alongside similar national developments elsewhere, including the German Indoor Championships in 1954 and Soviet Indoors in 1964. [2] [3] The European Athletics Indoor Championships became the first regular indoor international championship in 1966. [4]

German Indoor Athletics Championships

The German Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the German Athletics Association, which serves as the German national championship for the sport. Typically held over two to three days in February during the German winter, the first Unified Germany championships occurred in 1991, succeeding the West German and East German indoor nationals. The unified indoor event preceded the newly-unified outdoor German Athletics Championships in the summer of 1991. National indoor championships in relays, racewalking and combined track and field events are usually contested at separate locations.

Soviet Indoor Athletics Championships

The Soviet Indoor Athletics Championships was an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Soviet Athletics Federation, which served as the Soviet national championship for the sport. Typically held over two to three days in February during the Soviet winter, it was a later development to the national programme, supplementing the main outdoor Soviet Athletics Championships held in the summer.

The European Athletics Indoor Championships is a biennial indoor track and field competition for European athletes that is organised by the European Athletic Association. It was held for the first time in 1970, replacing the European Indoor Games, its predecessor event first held in 1966.

Events

The following athletics events featured as standard on the main AAA Championships programme:

Sprint (running) running over a short distance in a limited period of time

Sprinting is running over a short distance in a limited period of time. It is used in many sports that incorporate running, typically as a way of quickly reaching a target or goal, or avoiding or catching an opponent. Human physiology dictates that a runner's near-top speed cannot be maintained for more than 30–35 seconds due to the depletion of phosphocreatine stores in muscles, and perhaps secondarily to excessive metabolic acidosis as a result of anaerobic glycolysis.

Hurdling group of track and field events

Hurdling is the act of running and jumping over an obstacle at speed. In the early 19th century, hurdlers ran at and jumped over each hurdle, landing on both feet and checking their forward motion. After experimenting with different step patterns the 3-step for high hurdles, 7-step for low hurdles, and 15-step for intermediate hurdles was decided on. In the sport of athletics, hurdling forms the basis of a number track and field events which are a highly specialized form of obstacle racing. In these events, a series of barriers known as hurdles are set at precisely measured heights and distances which each athlete must pass by running over. Failure to pass over, by passing under, or intentionally knocking over hurdles will result in disqualification. Accidental knocking over of hurdles is not cause for disqualification, but the hurdles are weighted to make doing so disadvantageous. Hurdle design improvements were made in 1935, when they developed the L-shaped hurdle. With this shape, the athlete could hit the hurdle and it will tip down, clearing the athlete's path.

Events were initially raced and measured in imperial distances, with the transition to metric occurring in 1968 for men and 1969 for women. A men's 2000 metres steeplechase was contested from 1967 to 1985. Combined track and field events were introduced in 1987 in the form of a men's octathlon and a women's pentathlon; the octathlon was amended to the international standard men's heptathlon in 1991. Racewalking briefly featured on the programme, with a men's and women's 3000 metres track walk happening from 1997 to 2002. A women's 1.5 mile walk was also held in 1966 and 1967. and a men's 1-mile walk in 1936. The non-standard 600-yard run was held for both men and women from 1962 to 1964.

In line with the international expansion of women's athletics programmes to match the men's, the 3000 metres for women was added in 1973, the triple jump was added in 1991 and the pole vault in 1994.

Editions

#YearDateVenueLocationNotes
1935 Wembley Arena London
1936 Wembley Arena London
1937 Wembley Arena London
1938 Wembley Arena London
1939 Wembley Arena London
Not held 1940 to 1945 due to World War II
1962 Wembley Arena London
1963 Wembley Arena London
1964 Wembley Arena London
1965 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1966 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1967 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1968 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1969 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1970 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1971 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1972 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1973 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1974 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1975 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1976 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1977 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1978 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1979 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1980 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1981 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1982 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1983 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1984 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1985 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1986 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1987 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1988 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1989 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1990 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1991 Cosford Indoor Area RAF Cosford
1992 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
1993 National Indoor Arena Birmingham Heptathlon and pentathlon held at RAF Cosford
1994 National Indoor Arena Birmingham Heptathlon and pentathlon held at RAF Cosford
1995 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
1996 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
1997 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
1998 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
1999 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
2000 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
2001 National Indoor Arena Birmingham
2002 2–3 February [5] National Indoor Athletics Centre Cardiff
2003 National Indoor Arena Birmingham Heptathlon and pentathlon held at NIAC Cardiff
2004 11–12 February [6] English Institute of Sport Sheffield Heptathlon and pentathlon held at NIAC Cardiff
2005 English Institute of Sport Sheffield Heptathlon and pentathlon held at NIAC Cardiff
2006 7–8 February [7] English Institute of Sport Sheffield

Most successful athletes by event

EventMenMen's titlesWomenWomen's titles
60 metres Jason Gardener 5 Beverly Kinch 5
200 metres Linford Christie 6Flag of Ireland.svg  Ciara Sheehy  (IRL)3
400 metres Jim Aukett 4 Verona Elder 8
800 metres Martin Steele 4 Kirsty Wade 4
1500 metres Walter Wilkinson
Rob Harrison
2 Mary Stewart
Hayley Ovens
3
3000 metres Ian Stewart
Ray Smedley
3 Mary Stewart
Thelwyn Bateman
Sonia McGeorge
Angela Davies
Zara Hyde Peters
Jo Pavey
2
60 m hurdles Colin Jackson 7 Lorna Boothe
Lesley-Ann Skeete
4
2000 m steeplechase Ron McAndrew 4Not contested
High jump Geoff Parsons 5 Susan Moncrieff 7
Pole vault Mike Bull 8 Janine Whitlock 7
Long jump Chris Tomlinson 4 Sheila Parkin
Sue Reeve
Kim Hagger
Denise Lewis
Joanne Wise
3
Triple jump Aston Moore
Francis Agyepong
Julian Golley
4 Michelle Griffith 5
Shot put Geoff Capes
Mike Winch
Paul Edwards
6 Judy Oakes 18
Heptathlon/pentathlon John Heanley 3 Kelly Sotherton 3
3000 m walkFlag of Ireland.svg  Robert Heffernan  (IRL)3Flag of Ireland.svg  Gillian O'Sullivan  (IRL)3

Related Research Articles

UK Athletics Championships

The UK Athletics Championships was an annual national championship in track and field for the United Kingdom, organised by the British Athletics Federation. The event incorporated the 1980 Olympic trials for the British Olympic team. The venue for the event was rotational and designed to be inclusive – all four Home Nations hosted the event during its twenty-year existence, as well as several areas of England.

Lithuanian Indoor Athletics Championships

The Lithuanian Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Athletic Federation of Lithuania, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Lithuania. Recent competitions were held in Klaipėda. The first championships was held in 1948, but as the country was subsumed into the Soviet Union after World War II, the Soviet Athletics Championships served as the national event during this period. After the Act of the Re-Establishment of the State of Lithuania, a national Lithuanian championships was restored and held in 1990.

AAA Championships

The AAA Championships was an annual track and field competition organised by the Amateur Athletic Association of England. It was the foremost domestic athletics event in the United Kingdom during its lifetime. It was succeeded by the British Athletics Championships.

1986 UK Athletics Championships

The 1986 UK Athletics Championships was the national championship in outdoor track and field for the United Kingdom held at Cwmbran Stadium, Cwmbran. It was the fourth time the event was held in the Welsh town. The women's 5000 metres was dropped from the programme and replaced by a women's 10,000 metres event.

The 1989 UK Athletics Championships was the national championship in outdoor track and field for the United Kingdom held at Monkton Stadium, Jarrow. It was the first time that the event was held in North East England. The men's 10,000 metres was dropped from the programme and replaced by a 3000 metres event. Strong winds affected the jumps programme and several of the sprint races.

French Indoor Athletics Championships

The French Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Fédération française d'athlétisme (FFA), which serves as the French national championship for the sport. Typically held over two to three days in February during the French winter, it was first added to the national calendar in 1972, supplementing the main outdoor French Athletics Championships held in the summer since 1888.

Russian Indoor Athletics Championships

The Russian Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the All-Russia Athletic Federation (ARAF), which serves as the Russian national championship for the sport. It was first held in 1992, following the independence of Russia after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and replacing the Soviet Indoor Athletics Championships. It is typically held as a three-day event in the Russian winter around mid to late February. The venue of the championships is usually in Moscow or Volgograd. A total of 24 athletics events are on the current programme, divided evenly between the sexes.

Spanish Indoor Athletics Championships

The Spanish Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Royal Spanish Athletics Federation (RFEA), which serves as the Spanish national championship for the sport. Typically held over two days in February during the Spanish winter, it was first added to the national calendar in 1965, supplementing the main outdoor Spanish Athletics Championships held in the summer since 1917. It celebrated its 50th edition in 2014.

WAAA Championships

The WAAA Championships was an annual track and field competition organised by the Women's Amateur Athletic Association (WAAA) in England. It was the foremost domestic athletics event for women during its lifetime.

Swedish Indoor Athletics Championships

The Swedish Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Swedish Athletics Association, which serves as the Swedish national championship for the sport. The competition started as a non–official standing jumps contest in 1960, held at the Johanneshovs Isstadion in Stockholm. It expanded to a full indoor track and field competition in 1966, then later attained national championship status in 1984.

East German Indoor Athletics Championships

The East German Indoor Athletics Championships was an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the East German Athletics Association, which served as the national championship for the sport in East Germany. Typically held over two days in February during the German winter, it was first held in 1964.

West German Indoor Athletics Championships

The West German Indoor Athletics Championships was an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the German Athletics Association, which served as the national championship for the sport in West Germany. Typically held over two days in February during the German winter, it was first held in 1954.

Dutch Indoor Athletics Championships national indoor track and field competition for Dutch athletes

The Dutch Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Royal Dutch Athletics Federation, which serves as the national championship for the sport in the Netherlands. Typically held over two to three days in February during the Dutch winter, it was first added to the national calendar in 1969, supplementing the main outdoor Dutch Athletics Championships held in the summer since 1910.

Polish Indoor Athletics Championships national indoor athletics competition between Polish athletes

The Polish Indoor Athletics Championships is an annual indoor track and field competition organised by the Polish Athletic Association, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Poland. Typically held over two to three days in February during the Dutch winter, it was first added to the national calendar in 1933, supplementing the main outdoor Polish Athletics Championships held in the summer since 1920. The national indoor competition was held from 1933–56. After a near twenty-year gap, the championships was restored to its annual fixture in 1973.

Norwegian Athletics Championships

The Norwegian Athletics Championships is an annual outdoor track and field competition organised by the Norwegian Athletics Association, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Norway. Royal trophies (Kongepokal) are given to the most outstanding male and female athletes of the competition.

Yugoslavian Athletics Championships

The Yugoslavian Athletics Championships was an annual outdoor track and field competition organised by the Athletic Federation of Yugoslavia, which served as the national championship for the sport in Yugoslavia.

Swedish Athletics Championships

The Swedish Athletics Championships is an annual outdoor track and field competition organised by the Swedish Athletics Association, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Sweden.

Ukrainian Athletics Championships

The Ukrainian Athletics Championships is an annual outdoor track and field competition organised by the Ukrainian Athletic Federation, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Ukraine.

Austrian Athletics Championships

The Austrian Athletics Championships is an annual outdoor track and field competition organised by the Austrian Athletics Federation, which serves as the national championship for the sport in Austria.

References

  1. Knight, Tom (2004-02-06). Britain's indoor revolution. Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  2. Soviet Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  3. German Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  4. European Indoor Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  5. Turnbull, Simon (2000-02-03). Athletics: Spencer steps into limelight. The Independent. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  6. 2004 AAA Indoor Championships Complete Results. Power of 10. Retrieved 2018-03-10.
  7. 2006 AAA Indoor Championships Complete Results. Power of 10. Retrieved 2018-03-10.