Great North Run

Last updated

Great North Run
DateSeptember annually (occasionally October)
Location Newcastle upon Tyne to South Shields, England, UK
Event typeRoad
Distance Half marathon
Primary sponsor Simplyhealth
Established1981
Course recordsMen:
Flag of Kenya.svg Martin Mathathi 58:56
Women:
Flag of Kenya.svg Brigid Kosgei 1:04:28
Official site Great North Run

The Great North Run (branded the Simplyhealth Great North Run for sponsorship purposes) is the largest half marathon in the world, taking place annually in North East England each September. [1] Participants run between Newcastle upon Tyne and South Shields. The run was devised by former Olympic 10,000 m bronze medallist and BBC Sport commentator Brendan Foster.

Contents

The first Great North Run was staged on 28 June 1981, when 12,000 runners participated. By 2011, the number of participants had risen to 54,000. For the first year it was advertised as a local fun run; nearly thirty years on it has become one of the biggest running events in the world, and the biggest in the UK. Only the Great Manchester Run and London Marathon come close to attracting similar numbers of athletes each year.

The 1992 edition of the race incorporated the 1st IAAF World Half Marathon Championships. The event also has junior and mini races attached with these being run the Saturday before the main race on the Newcastle Quayside. Martin Mathathi holds the current men's course record with his run of 58:56 in 2011. In 2019, Brigid Kosgei's women's course record of 64:28 [2] bettered the previous mark by over a minute and was also the fastest ever half marathon by a woman; however, the course was not eligible for records. That same year, Mo Farah won a record sixth consecutive men's Great North Run. [3]

Course

The Great North Run starts in Newcastle upon Tyne on the A167 road (the central motorway), on the edge of both the city centre and the Town Moor. The route heads east and south down the motorway section, around the eastern side of the city centre, then crosses the Tyne Bridge into Gateshead. It heads around the eastern side of Gateshead town centre, then at a roundabout turns east and heads down the A184 (the Felling Bypass) in the direction of Sunderland. After 3.5 miles (5.6 km), the route turns off the A184 and heads north-east towards South Shields down the A194 (Leam Lane). 2.5 miles (4.0 km) later, the route reaches the southern side of Jarrow and it turns east down the A1300 (John Reid Road). The route passes through the south of South Shields (through Harton and Marsden) until it reaches the seafront just over 3.5 miles (5.6 km) later, where it turns north up the A183. The last mile (1.6 km) of the route runs along the seafront road to the finishing line at South Shields. [4] All roads on the course are closed several hours before the race begins, however multiple vehicles including TV crews, emergency services, event staff, and a fleet of buses carrying participants' belongings are authorised to travel between Newcastle and South Shields on the closed course roads ahead of and following the participants.

History

The Great North Run is a mass participation event: two lines of runners merging near the one mile mark. The Great North Run (259730978).jpg
The Great North Run is a mass participation event: two lines of runners merging near the one mile mark.

The run was devised by former Olympic 10,000 m bronze medallist and BBC Sport commentator Brendan Foster. Foster was inspired after running in the Round the Bays Race in New Zealand in 1979, and has built upon the Great North Run with a series of other Great Run road races.

The first Great North Run was staged on 28 June 1981, when 12,000 runners participated. By 2003, the number of participants had risen to 47,000. The 2011 event saw an announced field of 54,000. The number of finishers was 35,777 in 2007, the largest half marathon and the 13th largest running race that year. [5] In 2014, the event had 41,615 finishers, making it the largest half-marathon in the world as certified by Guinness World Records in 2016. [1]

For the first nine races, eight of them were held in June. Since 1990, the race has instead been held in the autumn, usually in September but occasionally in October instead. [6] Since 1990, the earliest date the race has been held on is 7 September (2014) and the latest is 22 October (2000). Bupa was the title partner of the Great North Run from the early 1990s until 2014, one of Britain's longest ever sports sponsorship agreements. In 2015 Morrisons announced their sponsorship of the Great Run series. [7] In November 2015, the Great Run Company announced it was searching for a new title sponsor which includes the Great North Run. The 2016 Great North Run was the first staging of the event without a title sponsor. [8] Simplyhealth became the new lead sponsor for 2017. [9]

Events

2017 Great North Run finishers medal 2017 Great North Run finishers medal.jpg
2017 Great North Run finishers medal

In 2004 a runner died (the eighth death in the event's then 24-year history). [10]

The 2005 Great North Run was the twenty-fifth edition of the race. Events to mark the anniversary included the launch of the Great North Run Cultural Programme at the Sage Gateshead. The race was started by Mike McLeod, the winner of the inaugural race in 1981. During the race, four participants died en route to South Shields. [11] [12] An inquest into the four deaths from 2005 began on Monday 5 June 2006 at Gateshead Council Chambers. [13] [14] [15] [16] In subsequent events, more emergency service personnel were brought in to ensure there was adequate cover.

In spite of increased medical provision at the 2006 race, a man in his twenties died. [17] [18]

The 2007 Great North Run was held on 30 September and was started by former England and Newcastle United manager Sir Bobby Robson. Kara Goucher defeated Paula Radcliffe in an impressive victory for the American. Goucher's winning time was 1:06:57.

The 2008 Great North Run was held on 5 October and was started by former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Tony Blair.

The 2009 Great North Run was held on 20 September [19] and was started by the musician Sting.

The 2010 Great North Run was the 30th running of the event and was held on 19 September and was started by TV presenters Ant & Dec. The number of finishers (half marathon only) was 39,459. [20]

The 2011 Great North Run took place on the morning of Sunday, 18 September 2011. The race was started by World 5,000-metre champion Mo Farah. [21]

In 2013 the 33rd Great North Run had 56000 participants, most of whom were raising money for charity. The elite races had Olympic Gold Medalists and World Champion long-distance runners participating including in the men's race, Mo Farah, Kenenisa Bekele and a regular supporter of the event, Haile Gebrselassie. Ethiopian Bekele won the men's event just ahead of Farah. Kenya's Priscah Jeptoo came first the women's race and multi Olympic Gold Medalist David Weir won the wheelchair event. [22]

In 2014 the 34th Great North Run had 57000 participants, celebrated the 1 millionth runner to cross the finish line, and was the first to have a British man win in 29 years. Mo Farah completed the race in exactly 1 hour, while Mary Keitany completed in 1:05:39 seconds - surpassing the previous course record of 1:05:40 by 1 second, a record held by Paula Radcliffe. Tracey Cramond, who was raising money for Butterwick Hospices, was the 1 millionth person to complete the run, stating she was "gobsmacked" and that it was her "moment of fame". [23] [24] The Great North Run was the first International Athletics Association Event (IAAF) event in the world to reach such a milestone.

In 2015 a 58-year-old male runner died. [25] [26] [ better source needed ]

The 2020 Great North Run was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. [27]

Past winners

Runners taking part in 2006 The Great North Run (259730979).jpg
Runners taking part in 2006
Paula Radcliffe and Kara Goucher heading the pack in the 2007 race GNR07 Ladies.jpg
Paula Radcliffe and Kara Goucher heading the pack in the 2007 race

Key:  Course record

EditionYearMen's winnerTime (h:m:s)Women's winnerTime (h:m:s)
1st1981Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mike McLeod  (GBR)1:03:23Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Karen Goldhawk  (GBR)1:17:36
2nd1982Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mike McLeod  (GBR)1:02:44Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Margaret Lockley  (GBR)1:19:24
3rd1983Flag of Portugal.svg  Carlos Lopes  (POR)1:02:46Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Julie Barleycorn  (GBR)1:16:39
4th1984Flag of Norway.svg  Øyvind Dahl  (NOR)1:04:36Flag of Norway.svg  Grete Waitz  (NOR)1:10:27
5th1985Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Steve Kenyon  (GBR)1:02:44Flag of Portugal.svg  Rosa Mota  (POR)1:09:54
6th1986Flag of Kenya.svg  Michael Musyoki  (KEN)1:00:43Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Lisa Martin  (AUS)1:09:45
7th1987Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Robert de Castella  (AUS)1:02:04Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Lisa Martin  (AUS)1:10:00
8th1988Flag of Ireland.svg  John Treacy  (IRL)1:01:00Flag of Norway.svg  Grete Waitz  (NOR)1:08:49
9th1989Flag of Morocco.svg  El Mostafa Nechchadi  (MAR)1:02:39Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Lisa Martin  (AUS)1:10:43
10th1990Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Steve Moneghetti  (AUS)1:00:34Flag of Portugal.svg  Rosa Mota  (POR)1:09:33
11th1991Flag of Kenya.svg  Benson Masya  (KEN)1:00:28Flag of Norway.svg  Ingrid Kristiansen  (NOR)1:10:57
12th1992Flag of Kenya.svg  Benson Masya  (KEN)1:00:24Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Liz McColgan  (GBR)1:08:53
13th1993Flag of Kenya.svg  Moses Tanui  (KEN)59:47Flag of Kenya.svg  Tegla Loroupe  (KEN)1:12:55
14th1994Flag of Kenya.svg  Benson Masya  (KEN)1:00:02Flag of Italy.svg  Rosanna Munerotto  (ITA)1:11:29
15th1995Flag of Kenya.svg  Moses Tanui  (KEN)1:00:39Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Liz McColgan  (GBR)1:11:42
16th1996Flag of Kenya.svg  Benson Masya  (KEN)1:01:43Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Liz McColgan  (GBR)1:10:28
17th1997Flag of South Africa.svg  Hendrick Ramaala  (RSA)1:00:25Flag of Kenya.svg  Lucia Subano  (KEN)1:09:24
18th1998Flag of South Africa.svg  Josia Thugwane  (RSA)1:02:32Flag of Ireland.svg  Sonia O'Sullivan  (IRL)1:11:50
19th1999Flag of Kenya.svg  John Mutai  (KEN)1:00:52Flag of Kenya.svg  Joyce Chepchumba  (KEN)1:09:07
20th2000Flag of Tanzania.svg  Phaustin Baha Sulle  (TAN)1:01:57Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Paula Radcliffe  (GBR)1:07:07
21st2001Flag of Kenya.svg  Paul Tergat  (KEN)1:00:30Flag of Kenya.svg  Susan Chepkemei  (KEN)1:08:40
22nd2002Flag of Kenya.svg  Paul Kosgei  (KEN)59:58Flag of Ireland.svg  Sonia O'Sullivan  (IRL)1:07:19
23rd2003Flag of South Africa.svg  Hendrick Ramaala  (RSA)1:00:01Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Paula Radcliffe  (GBR)1:05:40
24th2004Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Dejene Berhanu  (ETH)59:37Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Benita Johnson  (AUS)1:07:55
25th2005Flag of Eritrea.svg  Zersenay Tadese  (ERI)59:05Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Derartu Tulu  (ETH)1:07:33 [28]
26th2006Flag of South Africa.svg  Hendrick Ramaala  (RSA)1:01:03Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Berhane Adere  (ETH)1:10:03
27th2007Flag of Kenya.svg  Martin Lel  (KEN)1:00:08Flag of the United States.svg  Kara Goucher  (USA)1:06:57
28th2008Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Tsegaye Kebede  (ETH)59:45Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Gete Wami  (ETH)1:08:51
29th2009Flag of Kenya.svg  Martin Lel  (KEN)59:32Flag of Portugal.svg  Jéssica Augusto  (POR)1:09:08
30th2010Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Haile Gebrselassie  (ETH)59:33Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Berhane Adere  (ETH)1:08:49
31st2011Flag of Kenya.svg  Martin Mathathi  (KEN)58:56Flag of Kenya.svg  Lucy Wangui  (KEN)1:07:06
32nd2012Flag of Kenya.svg  Wilson Kipsang  (KEN)59:06Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Tirunesh Dibaba  (ETH)1:07:35
33rd2013Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Kenenisa Bekele  (ETH)1:00:09Flag of Kenya.svg  Priscah Jeptoo  (KEN)1:05:45
34th2014Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)1:00:00Flag of Kenya.svg  Mary Keitany  (KEN)1:05:39
35th2015Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)59:22Flag of Kenya.svg  Mary Keitany  (KEN)1:07:32
36th2016Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)1:00:04Flag of Kenya.svg  Vivian Cheruiyot  (KEN)1:07:54
37th2017Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)1:00:06Flag of Kenya.svg  Mary Keitany  (KEN)1:05:59
38th2018Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)59:27Flag of Kenya.svg  Vivian Cheruiyot  (KEN)1:07:44
39th2019Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mo Farah  (GBR)59:07Flag of Kenya.svg  Brigid Kosgei  (KEN)1:04:28
2020cancelled
40th2021Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Marc Scott  (GBR)1:01:22Flag of Kenya.svg  Hellen Obiri  (KEN)1:07:42

Wheelchair race

  Course record

EditionYearMen's winnerTime (h:m:s)Women's winnerTime (h:m:s)
1981Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Alan Robinson  (GBR)1:28:54
1982Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Alan Robinson  (GBR)1:32:00
1983Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  John Grant  (GBR)1:17:16Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Maria Dodsworth  (GBR)2:27:29
1984Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Terry Clark  (GBR)1:10:28Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Ellen Hodgson  (GBR)2:50:42
1985Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mark Tong  (GBR)1:17:18Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Anne Graham  (GBR)2:26:53
1986Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Chris Hallam  (GBR)1:01:15Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Karen Davidson  (GBR)1:13:04
1987Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Chris Hallam  (GBR)56:37Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Karen Davidson  (GBR)1:19:55
1988Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)57:57Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Josie Cichockyj  (GBR)1:37:38
1989Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Chris Hallam  (GBR)1:01:40Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Eileen Dixon  (GBR)2:06:54
1990Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Chris Hallam  (GBR)56:32Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)1:05:08
1991Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)47:24Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)1:00:22
1992Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)50:21Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)59:21
1993Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Ivan Newman  (GBR)54:11Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Rose Hill  (GBR)58:00
1994Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)50:33Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Rose Hill  (GBR)1:00:41
1995Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Jack McKenna  (GBR)52:16Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)58:44
1996Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)49:17Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)57:17
1997Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Holding  (GBR)44:22Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)52:17
1998Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Hadj Lahmar  (GBR)53:47Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)1:10:58
1999Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Hadj Lahmar  (GBR)49:57Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tanni Grey-Thompson  (GBR)1:02:32
2000Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Kevin Papworth  (GBR)49:18Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Sarah Piercey  (GBR)1:13:32
2001Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tushar Patel  (GBR)48:10Flag of Sweden.svg  Gunilla Wallengren  (SWE)52:59
2002Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Tushar Patel  (GBR)48:46Flag of Sweden.svg  Gunilla Wallengren  (SWE)57:47
2003Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)45:41Flag of Sweden.svg  Gunilla Wallengren  (SWE)53:04
2004Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Kenny Herriot  (GBR)45:37Flag of Sweden.svg  Gunilla Wallengren  (SWE)52:14
2005Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)42:33Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)50:04
2006Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Kurt Fearnley  (AUS)42:39Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Diane Roy  (CAN)50:33
2007Flag of South Africa.svg  Ernst van Dyk  (RSA)42:35Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)50:33
2008Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Josh Cassidy  (CAN)44:10Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Diane Roy  (CAN)51:18
2009Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)41:34Flag of the United States.svg  Amanda McGrory  (USA)49:47
2010Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)44:49Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)52:59
2011Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Josh Cassidy  (CAN)43:57Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)50:14
2012Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Josh Cassidy  (CAN)43:18Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Jane Egan  (GBR)1:15:00
2013Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)43:06Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)54:28
2014Flag of Spain.svg  Jordi Madeira  (ESP)43:02Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)50:34
2015Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)53:38
2016Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Mark Telford  (GBR)49:02
2017Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Simon Lawson  (GBR)44:22Flag of Switzerland.svg  Manuela Schär  (CHE)48:44
2018Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)41:19Flag of Poland.svg  Martyna Snopek  (POL)1:03:44
2019Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  David Weir  (GBR)43:29Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Jade Jones-Hall  (GBR)50:15
2020cancelled
2021Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Sean Frame  (GBR)49:52Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Shelly Woods  (GBR)57:01

See also

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