498

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
498 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 498
CDXCVIII
Ab urbe condita 1251
Assyrian calendar 5248
Balinese saka calendar 419–420
Bengali calendar −95
Berber calendar 1448
Buddhist calendar 1042
Burmese calendar −140
Byzantine calendar 6006–6007
Chinese calendar 丁丑(Fire  Ox)
3194 or 3134
     to 
戊寅年 (Earth  Tiger)
3195 or 3135
Coptic calendar 214–215
Discordian calendar 1664
Ethiopian calendar 490–491
Hebrew calendar 4258–4259
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 554–555
 - Shaka Samvat 419–420
 - Kali Yuga 3598–3599
Holocene calendar 10498
Iranian calendar 124 BP – 123 BP
Islamic calendar 128 BH – 127 BH
Javanese calendar 384–385
Julian calendar 498
CDXCVIII
Korean calendar 2831
Minguo calendar 1414 before ROC
民前1414年
Nanakshahi calendar −970
Seleucid era 809/810 AG
Thai solar calendar 1040–1041
Tibetan calendar 阴火牛年
(female Fire-Ox)
624 or 243 or −529
     to 
阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
625 or 244 or −528
Pope Symmachus (498-514) Pope Symmachus - Apse mosaic - Sant'Agnese fuori le mura - Rome 2016.jpg
Pope Symmachus (498–514)

Year 498 ( CDXCVIII ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Paulinus and Scytha (or, less frequently, year 1251 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 498 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Pope Adrian II was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States from 867 to his death. He continued the policy of his predecessor, Nicholas I. Despite seeking good relations with Louis II of Italy, he was placed under surveillance, and his wife and daughters were killed by Louis' supporters.

Pope Anastasius II was the bishop of Rome from 24 November 496 to his death. He was an important figure in trying to end the Acacian schism, but his efforts resulted in the Laurentian schism, which followed his death. Anastasius was born in Rome, the son of a priest, and is buried in St. Peter's Basilica.

The 500s decade ran from January 1, 500, to December 31, 509.

The 510s decade ran from January 1, 510, to December 31, 519.

The 490s decade ran from January 1, 490, to

The 480s decade ran from January 1, 480, to December 31, 489.

496 Calendar year

Year 496 (CDXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Paulus without colleague. The denomination 496 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 488 (CDLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ecclesius and Sividius. The denomination 488 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 492 (CDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Anastasius and Rufus. The denomination 492 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 506 (DVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Messala and Dagalaiphus. The denomination 506 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

515 Calendar year

Year 515 (DXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Florentius and Anthemius. The denomination 515 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

518 Calendar year

Year 518 (DXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Paulus without colleague. The denomination 518 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

1216 Calendar year

Year 1216

1059 Calendar year

Year 1059 (MLIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Anastasius, was the patriarch of Constantinople from 730 to 754. He had been proceeded by patriarch Germanos I. Anastasios was heavily involved in the controversy over icons (images). He was immaculately succeeded in ecumenical rite by Constantine II of Constantinople. His opinion of icons changed twice. First he opposed them, then he favored them, and finally he opposed them again.

Anastasius Bibliothecarius or Anastasius the Librarian was bibliothecarius and chief archivist of the Church of Rome and also briefly a claimant to the papacy.

The Isaurian War was a conflict that lasted from 492 to 497 and that was fought between the army of the Eastern Roman Empire and the rebels of Isauria. At the end of the war, Eastern Emperor Anastasius I regained control of the Isauria region and the leaders of the revolt were killed.

Photinus of Thessalonica was a disciple of Acacius, Patriarch of Constantinople (471–489) and a deacon in the Church.

Ōtomo no Kanamura Japanese warrior

Ōtomo no Kanamura (大伴金村) was a Japanese warrior and statesman during the late Kofun period. Most of what is known of his life comes from the Kojiki and the Nihon Shoki. His clan, the Ōtomo, had been highly influential at court since the time of his grandfather Ōtomo Muruya.

Heguri no Matori was a Japanese court minister of rank Ōomi (大臣) during the Kofun period, who was able to briefly usurp the throne of Japan in a coup attempt. He was the son of Heguri no Tsuka, and served in the administration of Emperor Yūryaku and Emperor Ninken.

References

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