AD 31

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
AD 31 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar AD 31
XXXI
Ab urbe condita 784
Assyrian calendar 4781
Balinese saka calendar N/A
Bengali calendar −562
Berber calendar 981
Buddhist calendar 575
Burmese calendar −607
Byzantine calendar 5539–5540
Chinese calendar 庚寅(Metal  Tiger)
2727 or 2667
     to 
辛卯年 (Metal  Rabbit)
2728 or 2668
Coptic calendar −253 – −252
Discordian calendar 1197
Ethiopian calendar 23–24
Hebrew calendar 3791–3792
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 87–88
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 3131–3132
Holocene calendar 10031
Iranian calendar 591 BP – 590 BP
Islamic calendar 609 BH – 608 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar AD 31
XXXI
Korean calendar 2364
Minguo calendar 1881 before ROC
民前1881年
Nanakshahi calendar −1437
Seleucid era 342/343 AG
Thai solar calendar 573–574
Tibetan calendar 阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
157 or −224 or −996
     to 
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
158 or −223 or −995

AD 31 ( XXXI ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Tiberius and Sejanus (or, less frequently, year 784 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination AD 31 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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AD 1 Calendar year

AD 1 (I), 1 AD or 1 CE is the epoch year for the Anno Domini calendar era. It was the first year of the Common Era (CE), of the 1st millennium and of the 1st century. It was a common year starting on Saturday or Sunday, a common year starting on Saturday by the proleptic Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Monday by the proleptic Gregorian calendar. In its time, year 1 was known as the Year of the Consulship of Caesar and Paullus, named after Roman consuls Gaius Caesar and Lucius Aemilius Paullus, and less frequently, as year 754 AUC within the Roman Empire. The denomination "AD 1" for this year has been in consistent use since the mid-medieval period when the anno Domini (AD) calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It was the beginning of the Christian/Common era. The preceding year is 1 BC; there is no year 0 in this numbering scheme. The Anno Domini dating system was devised in AD 525 by Dionysius Exiguus.

AD 23 Calendar year

AD 23 (XXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Pollio and Vetus. The denomination AD 23 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 28 (XXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Silanus and Nerva. The denomination AD 28 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 29 (XXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Geminus and Geminus. The denomination AD 29 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 30 (XXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Vinicius and Longinus. The denomination AD 30 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

AD 33 (XXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known in the Roman world as the Year of the Consulship of Ocella and Sulla. The denomination AD 33 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in the world for naming years.

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References

  1. Colin J. Humphreys and W. G. Waddington, "Dating the Crucifixion ," Nature 306 (December 22/29, 1983), pp. 743-46.
  2. Colin Humphreys, The Mystery of the Last Supper Cambridge University Press 2011 ISBN   978-0-521-73200-0, page 194
  3. 1 2 Blinzler, J. Der Prozess Jesu, fourth edition, Regensburg, Pustet, 1969, pp101-126
  4. Colin Humphreys, The Mystery of the Last Supper Cambridge University Press 2011 ISBN   978-0-521-73200-0, pages 14 and 62
  5. Vagi, David (2016). Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. Routledge. p. 107. ISBN   978-1-135-97125-0.