AD 365

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
365 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 365
CCCLXV
Ab urbe condita 1118
Assyrian calendar 5115
Balinese saka calendar 286–287
Bengali calendar −228
Berber calendar 1315
Buddhist calendar 909
Burmese calendar −273
Byzantine calendar 5873–5874
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
3061 or 3001
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
3062 or 3002
Coptic calendar 81–82
Discordian calendar 1531
Ethiopian calendar 357–358
Hebrew calendar 4125–4126
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 421–422
 - Shaka Samvat 286–287
 - Kali Yuga 3465–3466
Holocene calendar 10365
Iranian calendar 257 BP – 256 BP
Islamic calendar 265 BH – 264 BH
Javanese calendar 247–248
Julian calendar 365
CCCLXV
Korean calendar 2698
Minguo calendar 1547 before ROC
民前1547年
Nanakshahi calendar −1103
Seleucid era 676/677 AG
Thai solar calendar 907–908
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
491 or 110 or −662
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
492 or 111 or −661
Procopius (Roman usurper) Procopius siliqua - RIC 013e.jpg
Procopius (Roman usurper)

Year 365 ( CCCLXV ) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known in the West as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Valens (or, less frequently, year 1118 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 365 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Contents

Events

By place

Roman Empire

China

By topic

Religion

Births

Deaths

Date Unknown

Related Research Articles

4th century Century

The 4th century was the time period which lasted from 301 to 400. In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine the Great, who became the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 to build the city soon called Nova Roma ; it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The 310s decade ran from January 1, 310, to December 31, 319.

The 490s decade ran from January 1, 490, to

366 Calendar year

Year 366 (CCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Gratianus and Dagalaifus. The denomination 366 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 360s decade ran from January 1, 360, to December 31, 369.

The 330s decade ran from January 1, 330, to December 31, 339.

The 340s decade ran from January 1, 340, to December 31, 349.

The 350s decade ran from January 1, 350, to December 31, 359.

The 370s decade ran from January 1, 370, to December 31, 379.

Year 356 (CCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Iulianus. The denomination 356 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 260s decade ran from January 1, 260, to December 31, 269.

355 Calendar year

Year 355 (CCCLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Arbitio and Maesius. The denomination 355 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

373 Calendar year

Year 373 (CCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Valens. The denomination 373 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

328 Calendar year

Year 328 (CCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ianuarinus and Iustus. The denomination 328 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

364 Calendar year

Year 364 (CCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Varronianus. The denomination 364 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 362 (CCCLXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Mamertinus and Nevitta. The denomination 362 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

361 Calendar year

Year 361 (CCCLXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Taurus and Florentius. The denomination 361 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 339 (CCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Claudius. The denomination 339 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 317 (CCCXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Gallicanus and Bassus. The denomination 317 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Pope Liberius was the bishop of Rome from 17 May 352 until his death. According to the Catalogus Liberianus, he was consecrated on 22 May as the successor to Pope Julius I. He is not mentioned as a saint in the Roman Martyrology, making him the earliest pontiff not to be venerated as a saint in the Roman Rite. Liberius is mentioned in the Greek Menology, the Eastern equivalent to the martyrologies of the Western Church and a measure of sainthood prior to the institution of the formal Western processes of canonization.

References

  1. Earthquakes site Archived March 25, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  2. Kelly, Gavin (2004), "Ammianus and the Great Tsunami" (PDF), The Journal of Roman Studies , 94: 141–167, doi:10.2307/4135013 .
  3. "Felix (II) | antipope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved October 21, 2020.