Administrative divisions of Pskov Oblast

Last updated
Pskov Oblast, Russia Flag of None.svg
Administrative center: Pskov
As of 2013: [1]
# of districts
(районы)
24
# of cities/towns
(города)
14
# of urban-type settlements
(посёлки городского типа)
14
# of volosts
(волости)
192
As of 2002: [2]
# of rural localities
(сельские населённые пункты)
8,393
# of uninhabited rural localities
(сельские населённые пункты без населения)
1,073

Administratively, Pskov Oblast is divided into two cities and towns of oblast significance and twenty-four districts.

Contents

In terms of the population, the biggest administrative districts are Pskovsky District (34,323 in 2010) and Ostrovsky District (31,096), the smallest one is Usvyatsky District (5,598). [3]

In terms of the area, the biggest administrative district is Bezhanitsky District (3,535 square kilometres (1,365 sq mi)), the smallest one is Pushkinogorsky District (1,059 square kilometres (409 sq mi)).

Administrative and municipal divisions

Administrative divisions of Pskov Oblast
Map
DivisionStructure OKATO OKTMO Urban-type settlement/
/district-level town*
Rural
(volost)
AdministrativeMunicipal
Pskov (Псков)cityurban okrug58 40158 701
Velikiye Luki (Великие Луки)cityurban okrug58 41058 710
Bezhanitsky (Бежаницкий)district58 20458 60410
Velikoluksky (Великолукский)district58 20658 60611
Gdovsky (Гдовский)district58 20858 608
  • Gdov (Гдов) town*
8
Dedovichsky (Дедовичский)district58 21058 61011
Dnovsky (Дновский)district58 21258 612
  • Dno (Дно) town*
5
Krasnogorodsky (Красногородский)district58 21458 6146
Kunyinsky (Куньинский)district58 21658 6168
Loknyansky (Локнянский)district58 21858 6186
Nevelsky (Невельский)district58 22058 620
  • Nevel (Невель) town*
10
Novorzhevsky (Новоржевский)district58 22358 6238
Novosokolnichesky (Новосокольнический)district58 22658 6269
Opochetsky (Опочецкий)district58 22958 6298
Ostrovsky (Островский)district58 23358 6338
Palkinsky (Палкинский)district58 23758 6376
Pechorsky (Печорский)district58 24058 6406
Plyussky (Плюсский)district58 24358 6433
Porkhovsky (Порховский)district58 24758 64713
Pskovsky (Псковский)district58 24958 64917
Pustoshkinsky (Пустошкинский)district58 25058 6505
Pushkinogorsky (Пушкиногорский)district58 25158 6515
Pytalovsky (Пыталовский)district58 25358 6539
Sebezhsky (Себежский)district58 25458 65410
Strugo-Krasnensky (Струго-Красненский)district58 25658 6566
Usvyatsky (Усвятский)district58 25858 6584

Municipal divisions

The municipal divisions of Pskov Oblast are identical with its administrative divisions. All of the administrative districts of Pskov Oblast are municipally incorporated as municipal districts, and the cities of oblast significance are municipally incorporated as urban okrugs.

History

Historically, the whole area of the oblast was dependent on the Novgorod Republic and was annexed by the Grand Duchy of Moscow in the 15th and the 16th centuries. The southern part of the oblast was the battleground area and changed hands frequently, before landing in Poland by the end of the 16th century. December 29 [ O.S. December 18], 1708 Tsar Peter the Great issued an edict which established seven governorates. [4] [5] The description of the borders of the governorates was not given; instead, their area was defined as a set of towns and the lands adjacent to those towns. The present area of Pskov oblast was a part of Ingermanland Governorate, which was renamed Saint Petersburg Governorate in 1710. The governorates were subdivided into uyezds, and uyezds into volosts. In 1727, a separate Novgorod Governorate was established. It was subdivided into five provinces, and the current area of Novgorod Oblast was split between two of them - Pskov and Velikiye Luki Provinces. In 1772, after the First Partition of Poland, vast areas which formerly belonged to Poland were annexed by Russia, and in order to accommodate them, Pskov Governorate, with the center in Opochka, was established, and Pskov and Velikiye Luki Provinces, with the exception of Gdovsky Uyezd, were transferred to Pskov Governorate. All current area of Pskov Oblast belonged to Pskov Governorate, with the exception of the areas currently belonging to Gdovsky, Plyussky, and Strugo-Krasnensky Districts. These belonged to Saint Petersburg Governorate. [6] Porkhovsky Uyezd belonged to Novgorod Governorate until 1776, and then it was transferred to Pskov Governorate.

Pskov Governorate has proven to be too big to be administered properly, and in 1776, the decree of the empress, Catherine the Great, was issued. It divided the governorate into Pskov and Polotsk Governorates. Pskov was made the administrative center of Pskov Governorate. In 1777, Pskov Governorate was transformed into Pskov Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the emperor Paul I issued a decree restoring Pskov Governorate. [6]

The south of Pskov Oblast was transferred to Polotsk Governorate, which in 1777 became Polotsk Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and the area was transferred to Belarus Governorate; since 1802 to Vitebsk Governorate. After 1919, Vitebsk Governorate was a part of Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. [7] In 1924, Vitebsk Governorate was abolished, and Sebezhsky, Nevelsky, and Velizhsky Uyezds were transferred to Pskov Governorate.

In 1920, the Treaty of Tartu established the border between Russia and independent Estonia, and the areas constituting now Pechorsky District, along with the town of Pechory, were transferred to Estonia. In the same year, the Treaty of Riga fixed the boundary between Russia and Latvia, with some parts of Pskov Governorate transferred to Latvia.

On August 1, 1927, Pskov and Saint Petersburg Governorates were abolished, in the course of the administrative reform, and all of the areas which currently belong to Pskov Oblast and belonged then to Soviet Union, became a part of Leningrad Oblast. The oblast was divided into okrugs, and the current area of Pskov Oblast was split between Pskov and Velikiye Luki Okrugs. On June 17, 1929, Velikiye Luki Okrug was transferred to Western Oblast, a huge administrative unit with the center in Smolensk. In 1930, the okrugs were also abolished and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblasts. In 1935, the northern part of Western Oblast was transferred to the newly established Kalinin Oblast. The areas which constitute now Usvyatsky District and the southern part of Kunyinsky District remained in Western Oblast until it was abolished in 1937, at which point they were transferred to Smolensk Oblast. [8]

In the summer of 1941, during the World War II, the current area of Pskov Oblast was occupied by German troops. Most of it was not liberated until the summer of 1944. After the liberation, the administrative division of Soviet Union was considerably changed. On August 22, 1944, Velikiye Luki Oblast was established, with the center in Velikiye Luki, and on the following day, August 23, 1944, Pskov Oblast was established. In 1945, some areas were transferred from Estonian and Latvian Soviet Socialist Republics to Pskov Oblast and formed three districts, Pechorsky, Pytalovsky, and Kachanovsky Districts. Together, Pskov and Velikiye Luki Oblasts now contained all the areas which currently constitute Pskov Oblast. On October 2, 1957, Velikiye Luki Oblast was abolished and split between Pskov and Kalinin Oblasts. As of October 1957, Pskov Oblast also contained Kholmsky and Ploskoshsky Districts, which in July 1958 were transferred to Novgorod and Kalinin Oblasts, respectively.

In the middle of the 1960s the oblast went through the aborted Khrushchyov administrative reform, when districts were first divided into large-scale agricultural and industrial district, and several years later these were abolished, and the oblast got a district structure slightly different from that before the reform.

Abolished districts

After 1927 (with the exception of the aborted reform of 1963-1966) borders between the districts sometimes were modified, and as a result some of the districts were abolished. This list includes the districts which existed in the current area of Pskov Oblast. [8]

The area of Lovatsky District is currently split between Pskov and Novgorod Oblasts. The area of Podberezinsky Districts is split between Pskov, Tver, and Novgorod Oblasts. The area of Rudnensky District is split between Pskov and Leningrad Oblasts.

Renamed Districts

In 1937, Pushkinsky District was renamed Pushkinogorsky District.

Related Research Articles

Administratively, Leningrad Oblast is divided into seventeen districts and a town of oblast significance, Sosnovy Bor. Lomonosovsky District is the only one in Russia which has its administrative center located in the area of a different subject of Russian Federation.

Administratively, Novgorod Oblast is divided into three cities and towns of oblast significance and twenty-one districts.

Administratively, Tver Oblast is divided into two urban-type settlements under the federal government management, five cities and towns of oblast significance, and thirty-six districts.

Bezhanitsy Work settlement in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Bezhanitsy is an urban locality and the administrative center of Bezhanitsky District of Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is one of the two urban-type settlements in the district. Population: 4,333 (2010 Census); 4,846 (2002 Census); 6,789 (1989 Census).

Bezhanitsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Bezhanitsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the central and eastern parts of the oblast and borders with Dedovichsky District in the north, Poddorsky and Kholmsky Districts of Novgorod Oblast in the east, Loknyansky District in the south, Novosokolnichesky, Pustoshkinsky, and Opochetsky Districts in the southwest, and with Novorzhevsky District in the west. The area of the district is 3,535 square kilometers (1,365 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Bezhanitsy. Population: 13,264 (2010 Census); 17,547 ; 22,784 (1989 Census). The population of Bezhanitsy accounts for 32.7% of the district's total population.

Kholmsky District, Novgorod Oblast District in Novgorod Oblast, Russia

Kholmsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-one in Novgorod Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Poddorsky District in the north, Maryovsky District in the east, Andreapolsky District of Tver Oblast in the southeast, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the south, Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast in the southwest, and with Bezhanitsky District of Pskov Oblast in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,178.69 square kilometers (841.20 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Kholm. Population: 6,177 (2010 Census); 7,712 ; 9,174 (1989 Census). The population of Kholm accounts for 62.0% of the district's total population.

Kunyinsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Kunyinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast and borders with Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the north, Zapadnodvinsky District of Tver Oblast in the east, Velizhsky District of Smolensk Oblast in the south, Usvyatsky District in the southwest, and Velikoluksky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,621.4 square kilometers (1,012.1 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Kunya. Population: 10,277 (2010 Census); 12,928 ; 17,698 (1989 Census). The population of Kunya accounts for 30.4% of the district's total population.

Loknyansky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Loknyansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the east of the oblast and borders with Kholmsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the northeast, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the southeast, Velikoluksky District in the south, Novosokolnichesky District in the southwest, and with Bezhanitsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,412 square kilometers (931 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Loknya. Population: 9,535 (2010 Census); 13,268 ; 16,782 (1989 Census). The population of Loknya accounts for 40.6% of the district's total population.

Nevelsky District, Pskov Oblast District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Nevelsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Novosokolnichesky District in the north, Velikoluksky District in the east, Usvyatsky District in the southeast, Haradok, Polotsk, and Rasony Districts of Vitebsk Region of Belarus in the south, Sebezhsky District in the west, and with Pustoshkinsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,689.9 square kilometers (1,038.6 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Nevel. Population: 26,657 (2010 Census); 31,419 ; 38,951 (1989 Census). The population of Nevel accounts for 61.2% of the district's total population.

Novorzhevsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Novorzhevsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the oblast and borders with Porkhovsky District in the north, Dedovichsky District in the northeast, Bezhanitsky District in the east, Opochetsky District in the south, Pushkinogorsky District in the west, and with Ostrovsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 1,683 square kilometers (650 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Novorzhev. Population: 9,334 (2010 Census); 12,217 ; 15,477 (1989 Census). The population of Novorzhev accounts for 39.6% of the district's total population.

Novosokolnichesky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Novosokolnichesky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Loknyansky District in the north, Velikoluksky District in the east, Nevelsky District in the south, Pustoshkinsky District in the west, and with Bezhanitsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 1,616.0 square kilometers (623.9 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Novosokolniki. Population: 14,776 (2010 Census); 19,389 ; 21,319 (1989 Census). The population of Novosokolniki accounts for 54.9% of the district's total population.

Opochetsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Opochetsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the oblast and borders with Pushkinogorsky District in the north, Novorzhevsky District in the northeast, Bezhanitsky District in the east, Pustoshkinsky District in the southeast, Sebezhsky District in the south, and with Krasnogorodsky District in the west. The area of the district is 2,028.9 square kilometers (783.4 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Opochka. Population: 18,673 (2010 Census); 23,973 ; 28,877 (1989 Census). The population of Opochka accounts for 62.1% of the district's total population.

Pskovsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Pskovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the northwest of the oblast and borders with Gdovsky District in the north, Strugo-Krasnensky District in the northeast, Porkhovsky District in the east, Ostrovsky District in the south, and with Palkinsky and Pechorsky Districts in the southwest. Lake Peipus forms the border with Estonia in the west. The area of the district is 3,600 square kilometers (1,400 sq mi). Its administrative center is the city of Pskov. Population: 34,323 (2010 Census); 37,216 ; 37,557 (1989 Census).

Pustoshkinsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Pustoshkinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Bezhanitsky District in the north, Novosokolnichesky District in the east, Nevelsky District in the south, Sebezhsky District in the west, and with Opochetsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 1,870 square kilometers (720 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Pustoshka. Population: 9,379 (2010 Census); 12,071 ; 14,063 (1989 Census). The population of Pustoshka accounts for 49.2% of the district's total population.

Sebezhsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southwest of the oblast and borders with Rasony and Verkhnyadzvinsk Districts of Vitebsk Oblast of Belarus in the south, Zilupe, Ludza, and Cibla municipalities of Latvia in the west, Krasnogorodsky and Opochetsky Districts in the north, and with Pustoshkinsky and Nevelsky Districts in the east. The area of the district is 3,100 square kilometers (1,200 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Sebezh. Population: 21,674 (2010 Census); 25,473 ; 26,926 (1989 Census). The population of Sebezh accounts for 29.4% of the district's total population.

Usvyatsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Usvyatsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Velikoluksky District in the north, Kunyinsky District in the east, Velizhsky District of Smolensk Oblast in the southeast, Vitebsk and Haradok Districts of Belarus in the southwest, and Nevelsky District in the west. The area of the district is 1,100 square kilometers (420 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Usvyaty. Population: 5,598 (2010 Census); 6,360 ; 7,905 (1989 Census). The population of Usvyaty accounts for 52.9% of the district's total population.

Velikoluksky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Velikoluksky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast and borders with Loknyansky District in the north, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the northeast, Kunyinsky District in the east, Usvyatsky District in the south, Nevelsky District in the southwest, and with Novosokolnichesky District in the west. The area of the district is 2,960 square kilometers (1,140 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Velikiye Luki. Population: 22,121 (2010 Census); 24,035 ; 31,911 (1989 Census).

Toropetsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Toropetsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast and borders with Kholmsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the north, Andreapolsky District in the east, Zapadnodvinsky District in the south, Kunyinsky District of Pskov Oblast in the southwest, Velikoluksky District of Pskov Oblast in the west, and with Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast in the northwest. The area of the district is 3,373 square kilometers (1,302 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Toropets. Population: 20,526 ; 25,235 (2002 Census); 31,228 (1989 Census). The population of Toropets accounts for 63.4% of the district's total population.

Velikiye Luki Oblast

Velikiye Luki Oblast was an oblast of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1944 to 1957. Its seat was in the city of Velikiye Luki. The oblast was located in the northwest of European Russia, and its territory is currently divided between Novgorod, Pskov, and Tver Oblasts.

Loknya, Pskov Oblast Urban locality and the administrative center of Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast, Russia

Loknya is an urban locality and the administrative center of Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast, Russia. Municipally, it is incorporated as Loknya Urban Settlement, the only urban settlement in the district. Population: 3,872 (2010 Census); 4,898 (2002 Census); 6,061 (1989 Census).

References

Notes

  1. Государственный комитет Российской Федерации по статистике. Комитет Российской Федерации по стандартизации, метрологии и сертификации. №ОК 019-95 1 января 1997 г. «Общероссийский классификатор объектов административно-территориального деления. Код 58», в ред. изменения №278/2015 от 1 января 2016 г.. (State Statistics Committee of the Russian Federation. Committee of the Russian Federation on Standardization, Metrology, and Certification. #OK 019-95 January 1, 1997 Russian Classification of Objects of Administrative Division (OKATO). Code 58 , as amended by the Amendment #278/2015 of January 1, 2016. ).
  2. Results of the 2002 Russian Population CensusTerritory, number of districts, inhabited localities, and rural administrations of the Russian Federation by federal subject Archived September 28, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  3. Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). "Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1" [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  4. Указ об учреждении губерний и о росписании к ним городов (in Russian)
  5. Архивный отдел Администрации Мурманской области. Государственный Архив Мурманской области. (1995). Административно-территориальное деление Мурманской области (1920-1993 гг.). Справочник. Мурманск: Мурманское издательско-полиграфическое предприятие "Север". pp. 19–20.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  6. 1 2 Коломыцева, Н. В. Псковской губернии 225 лет (in Russian). Краеведческий архив Псковской области. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012. Retrieved April 5, 2012.
  7. Область (местность) (in Russian). Great Soviet Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on March 31, 2014. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
  8. 1 2 Герасимёнок, Т. Е.; Н. В. Коломыцева; И. С. Пожидаев; С. М. Фёдоров; К. И. Карпов (2002). Территориальное деление Псковской области (in Russian). Pskov. ISBN   5-94542-031-X.

Sources