Administrative divisions of Tver Oblast

Last updated
Tver Oblast, Russia Flag of Tver Oblast.svg
Administrative center: Tver
As of 2013: [1]
# of districts
(районы)
36
# of cities and towns
(города)
23
# of urban-type settlements
(посёлки городского типа)
28
# of selsovets, rural okrugs, and rural settlements
(сельсоветы, сельские округа и сельские поселения)
313
As of 2002: [2]
# of rural localities
(сельские населённые пункты)
9,509
# of uninhabited rural localities
(сельские населённые пункты без населения)
1,411

Administratively, Tver Oblast is divided into two urban-type settlements under the federal government management, five cities and towns of oblast significance, and thirty-six districts.

Contents

In terms of the population, the biggest administrative district is Konakovsky District (87,125 in 2010), the smallest one is Molokovsky District (5,235) and Lesnoy District (5,252). [3]

In terms of the area, the biggest administrative district is Kalininsky District (4,245 square kilometres (1,639 sq mi)), the smallest ones are Kesovogorsky District (962 square kilometres (371 sq mi)) and Sonkovsky District (970 square kilometres (370 sq mi)).

Administrative divisions

Administrative districts of Novgorod Oblast. The numbers denote the following districts: 1- Andreapolsky, 2 - Bezhetsky, 3 - Belsky, 4 - Bologovsky, 5 - Vesyegonsky, 6 - Vyshnevolotsky, 7 - Zharkovsky, 8 - Zapadnodvinsky, 9 - Zubtsovsky, 10 - Kalininsky, 11 - Kalyazinsky, 12 - Kashinsky, 13 - Kesovogorsky, 14 - Kimrsky, 15 - Konakovsky, 16 - Krasnokholmsky, 17 - Kuvshinovsky, 18 - Lesnoy, 19 - Likhoslavlsky, 20 - Maksatikhinsky, 21 - Molokovsky, 22 - Nelidovsky, 23 - Oleninsky, 24 - Ostashkovsky, 25 - Penovsky, 26 - Rameshkovsky, 27 - Rzhevsky, 28 - Sandovsky, 29 - Selizharovsky, 30 - Sonkovsky, 31 - Spirovsky, 32 - Staritsky, 33 - Torzhoksky, 34 - Toropetsky, 35 - Udomelsky, 36 - Firovsky. Tver-oblast-adm-delenie.svg
Administrative districts of Novgorod Oblast. The numbers denote the following districts: 1- Andreapolsky, 2 - Bezhetsky, 3 - Belsky, 4 - Bologovsky, 5 - Vesyegonsky, 6 - Vyshnevolotsky, 7 - Zharkovsky, 8 - Zapadnodvinsky, 9 - Zubtsovsky, 10 - Kalininsky, 11 - Kalyazinsky, 12 - Kashinsky, 13 - Kesovogorsky, 14 - Kimrsky, 15 - Konakovsky, 16 - Krasnokholmsky, 17 - Kuvshinovsky, 18 - Lesnoy, 19 - Likhoslavlsky, 20 - Maksatikhinsky, 21 - Molokovsky, 22 - Nelidovsky, 23 - Oleninsky, 24 - Ostashkovsky, 25 - Penovsky, 26 - Rameshkovsky, 27 - Rzhevsky, 28 - Sandovsky, 29 - Selizharovsky, 30 - Sonkovsky, 31 - Spirovsky, 32 - Staritsky, 33 - Torzhoksky, 34 - Toropetsky, 35 - Udomelsky, 36 - Firovsky.

Municipal divisions

The municipal divisions of Tver Oblast are identical with its administrative divisions. All of the administrative districts of Tver Oblast are municipally incorporated as municipal districts, and the cities of oblast significance are municipally incorporated as urban okrugs.

History

Before 1918

December 29 [ O.S. December 18], 1708 Tsar Peter the Great issued an edict which established seven governorates. [4] [5] The description of the borders of the governorates was not given; instead, their area was defined as a set of towns and the lands adjacent to those towns. The present area of Tver oblast was split between Ingermanland Governorate, which was renamed Saint Petersburg Governorate in 1710, Moscow Governorate, and Smolensk Governorate. The governorates were subdivided into uyezds, and uyezds into volosts. In 1713, Smolensk Governorate was abolished and split between Moscow and Riga Governorates; in 1726, it was re-established. In 1727, a separate Novgorod Governorate was established, and the areas within present Tver Oblast, belonging to Saint Petersburg Governorate, were transferred to Novgorod and Moscow Governorates. It was subdivided into five provinces, and the current area of Tver Oblast belonged to two of them — Tver Province and Velikiye Luki Province. The rest of the current area of the oblast belonged to Uglich Province of Moscow Governorate and Belsky Uyezd of Smolensk Governorate.

In 1775-1776, the administrative reform abolished governorates and created viceroyalties. The current area of Tver Oblast was divided between Tver, Novgorod, Pskov, and Smolensk Viceroyalties. In 1796, the viceroyalties were abolished, and transformed back into eponymous governorates.

In the 19th century, the area was divided between the following uyezds,

Minor areas also belonged to Kholmsky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate, Velizhsky Uyezd of Vitebsk Governorate, and to Myshkinsky Uyezd of Yaroslavl Governorate.

1918—1935

On 10 March 1918, Krasnokholmsky Uyezd with the center in Krasny Kholm was established. On 28 December 1918 Kimrsky Uyezd with the center of Kimry was established as well. On 25 April 1921, Vesyegonsky and Krasnokholmsky Uyezds were transferred to newly established Rybinsk Governorate. In 1921, there was some minor land exchange between Tver Governorate and Moscow and Rybinsk Governorates. On 23 February 1923, Rybinsk Governorate was abolished, and the uyezds were transferred back to Tver Governorate. [6]

On 30 May 1922, Zubtsovsky, Kalyazinsky, and Korchevskoy Uyezds were abolished and merged into Rzhevsky, Kashinsky, and Kimrsky Uyezds, respectively. [6]

On 1 August 1927 Novgorod and Pskov Governorates were abolished, and their uyezds were merged into newly established Leningrad Oblast, with the administrative center in Leningrad, which included the northwestern part of Russian Federation. The oblast was subdidived into 140 districts, which were grouped into nine okrugs. The areas which currently belong to Tver Oblast were grouped into Velikiye Luki Okrug with the center in Velikiye Luki. [7]

The following districts have been established in Velikiye Luki Okrug, [7] Bologovsky, Idritsky, Ilyinsky, Kholmsky, Kunyinsky, Leninsky, Loknyansky, Nasvinsky, Nevelsky, Novosokolnichesky, Oktyabrsky, Ostashkovsky, Penovsky, Porechyevsky, Pustoshkinsky, Rykovsky, Sebezhsky, Sovetsky, Toropetsky, Troitsky, Tsevelsky, Usmynsky, Ust-Dolyssky, Usvyatsky, Velizhsky, and Velikoluksky.

Bologovsky District was established and included into Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast.

On 12 July 1929 Moscow and Smolensk Governorates were abolished as well. Their uyezds formed a number of administrative divisions, and current area of Tver Oblast overlapped with two of them, Moscow and Western Oblasts. Western Oblast had the administrative center in Smolensk. These oblasts were subdivided into okrugs as well. Velikiye Luki Okrug was transferred from Leningrad to Western Oblast; additionally, Rzhev Okrug with the center in Rzhev was established in Western Oblast, and most of its area later entered Tver Oblast. The following districts were established in Rzhev Okrug, [8] Belsky, Kamensky, Karmanovsky, Lukovnikovsky, Molodotudsky, Nelidovsky, Oleninsky, Pogorelsky, Rzhevsky, Selizharovsky, Staritsky, Stepurinsky, Sychyovsky, Vysokovsky, Yeltsovsky, and Zubtsovsky.

In Moscow Oblast, three of the okrugs were established in the areas which later formed Tver Oblast. They contained the following districts: [6]

On 23 July 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts became directly subordinate to the oblasts. On 20 November 1931, Tver was renamed Kalinin. [6]

After 1935

On 29 January 1935 Kalinin Oblast was established on the areas which previously belonged to Moscow, Western and Leningrad Oblasts. The city of Kalinin became the administrative center of the oblast. [6]

Originally, it contained the following districts:

Between 9 July 1937 and 7 February 1939, Karelian National Okrug existed as a territory with special status within Kalinin Oblast. It was intended to be a Tver Karelians autonomy. The okrug consisted of Kozlovsky, Likhoslavlsky, Maksatikhinsky, Novokarelsky, and Rameshkovsky Districts. Its administrative center was located in the town of Likhoslavl. [6]

On March 5, 1935, Velikiye Luki Okrug, one of the okrugs abutting the boundaries of the Soviet Union, was established. It consisted of Bezhanitsky, Loknyansky, Nevelsky, Novorzhevsky, Novosokolnichesky, Opochetsky, Pustoshkinsky, Pushkinsky, Sebezhsky, and Velikoluksky Districts. On May 11, 1937, the okrug was split into Velikiye Luki and Opochka Okrugs. On 4 May 1938 Velikoluksky Okrug was abolished, and on 5 February 1941 Opochetsky Okrug was abolished as well. The districts were directly subordinated by the oblast. [6]

During World War II, between 1941 and 1944, the western part of the oblas were occupied by German troops.

On 22 August 1944, Velikiye Luki Oblast was established, and on 23 August 1944, Pskov Oblast was established, to administrate areas of Soviet Union previously occupied by German troops and liberated in the course of World War II. A number of districts were transferred from Tver Oblast to these two oblasts, [6]

On 2 October 1957 Velikiye Luki Oblast was abolished. Its area was split between Kalinin and Pskov Oblasts. Belsky, Ilyinsky, Leninsky, Nelidovsky, Oktyabrsky, Penovsky, Seryozhinsky, Toropetsky, and Zharkovsky Districts were transferred to Kalinin Oblast, and all other districts were merged into Pskov Oblast. On 29 July 1958 Ploskoshsky District was transferred from Pskov to Kalinin Oblast, which finally set the current borders of Tver Oblast. [6]

In the middle of the 1960s the oblast went through the abortive Khrushchyov administrative reform, when districts were first divided into large-scale agricultural and industrial districts, and several years later these were abolished, and the oblast got a district structure slightly different from that before the reform.

In 1990, Kalinin Oblast was renamed Tver Oblast.

Abolished districts

After 1927 (with the exception of the aborted reform of 1963-1965) borders between the districts sometimes were modified, and as a result some of the districts were abolished. This list includes the districts which existed in the current area of Tver Oblast. [6]

Renamed districts

Several of the districts were renamed: Tverskoy into Kalininsky, Kuznetsovsky into Konakovsky, Kamensky into Kuvshinovsky, Kirovsky into Selizharovsky; Novotorzhsky into Torzhoksky. Kamensky and Kirovsky Districts were not renamed directly but rather abolished and later re-established under a different name.

Related Research Articles

Toropets Town in Tver Oblast, Russia

Toropets is a town and the administrative center of Toropetsky District in Tver Oblast, Russia, located where the Toropa River enters Lake Solomennoye. Population: 13,015 (2010 Census); 14,600 (2002 Census); 17,510 (1989 Census).

Andreapol Town in Tver Oblast, Russia

Andreapol is a town and the administrative center of Andreapolsky District in Tver Oblast, Russia, located on the Valdai Hills on the left bank in the upper course of the Western Dvina. Population: 8,286 (2010 Census); 9,317 (2002 Census); 9,610 (1989 Census); 12,000 (1968).

Administratively, Novgorod Oblast is divided into three cities and towns of oblast significance and twenty-one districts.

Administratively, Pskov Oblast is divided into two cities and towns of oblast significance and twenty-four districts.

Andreapolsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Andreapolsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the Valdai Hills in the west of the oblast and borders with Maryovsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the north, Penovsky District in the northeast, Selizharovsky District in the east, Nelidovsky District in the south, Zapadnodvinsky District in the southwest, Toropetsky District in the west, and with Kholmsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the northwest. The area of the district is 3,051 square kilometers (1,178 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Andreapol. Population: 13,756 ; 16,213 (2002 Census); 17,900 (1989 Census). The population of Andreapol accounts for 60.2% of the district's total population.

Western Oblast was an oblast of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1929 to 1937. Its seat was in the city of Smolensk. The oblast was located in the west of European Russia, and its territory is currently divided between Bryansk, Kaluga, Pskov, Smolensk, and Tver Oblasts.

Bezhanitsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Bezhanitsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the central and eastern parts of the oblast and borders with Dedovichsky District in the north, Poddorsky and Kholmsky Districts of Novgorod Oblast in the east, Loknyansky District in the south, Novosokolnichesky, Pustoshkinsky, and Opochetsky Districts in the southwest, and with Novorzhevsky District in the west. The area of the district is 3,535 square kilometers (1,365 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Bezhanitsy. Population: 13,264 (2010 Census); 17,547 ; 22,784 (1989 Census). The population of Bezhanitsy accounts for 32.7% of the district's total population.

Kholmsky District, Novgorod Oblast District in Novgorod Oblast, Russia

Kholmsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-one in Novgorod Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Poddorsky District in the north, Maryovsky District in the east, Andreapolsky District of Tver Oblast in the southeast, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the south, Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast in the southwest, and with Bezhanitsky District of Pskov Oblast in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,178.69 square kilometers (841.20 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Kholm. Population: 6,177 (2010 Census); 7,712 ; 9,174 (1989 Census). The population of Kholm accounts for 62.0% of the district's total population.

Kunyinsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Kunyinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast and borders with Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the north, Zapadnodvinsky District of Tver Oblast in the east, Velizhsky District of Smolensk Oblast in the south, Usvyatsky District in the southwest, and Velikoluksky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,621.4 square kilometers (1,012.1 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Kunya. Population: 10,277 (2010 Census); 12,928 ; 17,698 (1989 Census). The population of Kunya accounts for 30.4% of the district's total population.

Loknyansky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Loknyansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the east of the oblast and borders with Kholmsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the northeast, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the southeast, Velikoluksky District in the south, Novosokolnichesky District in the southwest, and with Bezhanitsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 2,412 square kilometers (931 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Loknya. Population: 9,535 (2010 Census); 13,268 ; 16,782 (1989 Census). The population of Loknya accounts for 40.6% of the district's total population.

Pustoshkinsky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Pustoshkinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Bezhanitsky District in the north, Novosokolnichesky District in the east, Nevelsky District in the south, Sebezhsky District in the west, and with Opochetsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 1,870 square kilometers (720 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Pustoshka. Population: 9,379 (2010 Census); 12,071 ; 14,063 (1989 Census). The population of Pustoshka accounts for 49.2% of the district's total population.

Velikoluksky District District in Pskov Oblast, Russia

Velikoluksky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the twenty-four in Pskov Oblast, Russia. It is located in the southeast of the oblast and borders with Loknyansky District in the north, Toropetsky District of Tver Oblast in the northeast, Kunyinsky District in the east, Usvyatsky District in the south, Nevelsky District in the southwest, and with Novosokolnichesky District in the west. The area of the district is 2,960 square kilometers (1,140 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Velikiye Luki. Population: 22,121 (2010 Census); 24,035 ; 31,911 (1989 Census).

Bologovsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Bologovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the north of the oblast and borders with Borovichsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the north, Udomelsky District in the east, Vyshnevolotsky District in the southeast, Firovsky District and the urban-type settlement of Ozyorny in the south, Valdaysky District of Novgorod Oblast in the west, and with Okulovsky District, also of Novgorod Oblast, to the northwest. The area of the district is 2,463.7 square kilometers (951.2 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Bologoye. Population: 38,557 ; 18,757 (2002 Census); 32,790 (1989 Census). The population of Bologoye accounts for 60.9% of the district's total population.

Firovsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Firovsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the north of the oblast and borders with the urban-type settlement of Ozyorny in the north, Bologovsky District in the northeast, Vyshnevolotsky District in the east, Kuvshinovsky District in the south, Ostashkovsky District in the southwest, Demyansky District of Novgorod Oblast in the west, and with Valdaysky District, also of Novgorod Oblast, in the northwest. The area of the district is 1,836 square kilometers (709 sq mi). Its administrative center is the urban locality of Firovo. Population: 9,396 ; 11,919 (2002 Census); 14,282 (1989 Census). The population of Firovo accounts for 25.9% of the district's total population.

Kalininsky District, Tver Oblast District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Kalininsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south of the oblast and borders with Likhoslavlsky District in the north, Rameshkovsky District in the northeast, Kimrsky District in the east, Konakovsky District in the southeast, Lotoshinsky District of Moscow Oblast in the south, Staritsky District in the southwest, and with Torzhoksky District in the west. The area of the district is 4,244.7 square kilometers (1,638.9 sq mi). Its administrative center is the city of Tver. Population: 52,047 ; 54,857 (2002 Census); 58,330 (1989 Census).

Staritsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Staritsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the central and southern parts of the oblast and borders with Kuvshinovsky District in the north, Torzhoksky District in the northeast, Kalininsky District in the east, Lotoshinsky District of Moscow Oblast in the southeast, Zubtsovsky District in the south, Rzhevsky District in the southwest, and with Selizharovsky District in the west. The area of the district is 3,005 square kilometers (1,160 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Staritsa. Population: 24,056 ; 25,765 (2002 Census); 28,764 (1989 Census). The population of Staritsa accounts for 35.8% of the district's total population.

Toropetsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Toropetsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast and borders with Kholmsky District of Novgorod Oblast in the north, Andreapolsky District in the east, Zapadnodvinsky District in the south, Kunyinsky District of Pskov Oblast in the southwest, Velikoluksky District of Pskov Oblast in the west, and with Loknyansky District of Pskov Oblast in the northwest. The area of the district is 3,373 square kilometers (1,302 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Toropets. Population: 20,526 ; 25,235 (2002 Census); 31,228 (1989 Census). The population of Toropets accounts for 63.4% of the district's total population.

Torzhoksky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Torzhoksky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the oblast and borders with Spirovsky District in the north, Likhoslavlsky District in the northeast, Kalininsky District in the east, Staritsky District in the south, Kuvshinovsky District in the west, and with Vyshnevolotsky District in the northwest. The area of the district is 3,128 square kilometers (1,208 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Torzhok. Population: 22,534 ; 23,856 (2002 Census); 27,376 (1989 Census).

Zapadnodvinsky District District in Tver Oblast, Russia

Zapadnodvinsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the thirty-six in Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west of the oblast and borders with Toropetsky District in the north, Andreapolsky District in the northeast, Nelidovsky District in the east, Zharkovsky District in the southeast, Velizhsky District of Smolensk Oblast in the south, and with Kunyinsky District of Pskov Oblast in the west. The area of the district is 2,816 square kilometers (1,087 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Zapadnaya Dvina. Population: 16,018 ; 19,707 (2002 Census); 24,585 (1989 Census). The population of Zapadnaya Dvina accounts for 58.6% of the district's total population.

Staraya Toropa Work settlement in Tver Oblast, Russia

Staraya Toropa is an urban-type settlement in Zapadnodvinsky District of Tver Oblast, Russia. It is located on the right bank of the Toropa River. Population: 1,995 (2010 Census); 2,306 (2002 Census); 2,802 (1989 Census).

References

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