Australia women's national rugby union team

Last updated

Australia
Wallaroos Australian women's rugby team logo.png
Nickname(s)Wallaroos
Emblem Wallaby
Union Rugby Australia
Head coach Dwayne Nestor
Captain Grace Hamilton
Kit left arm goldgreenlower.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body thingreenlowsidesongold.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm goldgreenlower.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
World Rugby ranking
Current5 (as of 23 November 2020)
Highest3 (January 2004)
Lowest7 (January 2009)
First international
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 0–37 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg
(Sydney, Australia 2 September 1994)
Biggest win
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 87–0 Samoa  Flag of Samoa.svg
(Samoa, 8 August 2009)
Biggest defeat
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 64–0 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
(Auckland, New Zealand 22 July 1995)
World Cup
Appearances6 (First in 1998 )
Best result3rd place, 2010
Australia at the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup. 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup - Australia 01.jpg
Australia at the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup.

The Australia women's national rugby union team, also known as the Wallaroos, has competed at all Women's Rugby World Cups since 1998, with their best result finishing in third place in 2010.

Contents

Australian women have been playing rugby since the late 1930s, in regional areas of New South Wales. In 1992 the first National Women's Tournament as held in Newcastle, NSW. The following year the Australian Women's Rugby Union was established, and it was declared that the national women's team would be called the Wallaroos.

History

The Wallaroos played their first international in 1994 against New Zealand, also known as the Black Ferns. The match was played at North Sydney Oval, and NZ won the game 37 to 0. The team placed fifth at their first World Cup appearance in 1998 in the Netherlands. They placed fifth at the 2002 event in Barcelona, Spain also.

In 2014, The Wallaroos played two Test matches in New Zealand against their Tasman rivals, the Black Ferns, and North American outfit, Canada. Although losing both of these matches, the Wallaroos took this experience into the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup. The Australian team was second in the pool stage behind host team France and was narrowly defeated by the United States in the first playoff, but beat Wales in their last match to finish the tournament in seventh place.

Results

World Cup

YearRoundPositionGPWDLPFPA
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg 1991 Did Not Enter
Flag of Scotland.svg 1994
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1998 Quarter-finals5th53028470
Flag of Spain.svg 2002 Quarter-finals7th42026354
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2006 Plate semi-final7th520311885
Flag of England.svg 2010 Third play-off Bronze medal icon.svg rd530211567
Flag of France.svg 2014 Plate semi-final7th530210449
IRFU flag.svg 2017 Fifth play-off6th520394149
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2021 Qualified
Total6/93rd2915014578474

Overall

Summary of matches (full internationals only) updated to the end of the 2017 World Cup:

Opposition First game Played Won Drawn Lost % Won
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2014 3 0 0 30%
Flag of England.svg  England 1998 5 0 0 50%
Flag of France.svg  France 1998 5 1 0 420%
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 1998 4 3 0 175%
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 2017 1 1 0 0100%
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 199415 0 0150%
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 2009 1 1 0 0100%
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1998 2 2 0 0100%
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2006 3 3 0 0100%
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1998 1 1 0 0100%
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1997 5 0 0 50%
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 2002 4 4 0 0100%
Summary 19944916 03335%

Full internationals

See Women's international rugby for information about the status of international games and match numbering.

1990s

[110]
1994-09-02 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0–37 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Sydney [1/8/1]
[123]
1995-07-22 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg64–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Auckland [9/2/2]
[140]
1996-08-31 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg5–28 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Sydney [3/10/3]
[169]
1997-08-02 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg24–28 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Brisbane [4/24/1]
[172]
1997-08-16 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg44–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Dunedin [15/5/4]
[197]
1998-05-02 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg21–0 IRFU flag.svg  Ireland Amsterdam [6/22/1]
[204]
1998-05-05 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg8–10 Flag of France.svg  France Amsterdam [7/46/1]
[206]
1998-05-09 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg13–30 Flag of England.svg  England Amsterdam [8/45/1]
[216]
1998-05-12 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg17–15 Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Amsterdam [9/18/1]
[228]
1998-05-16 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg25–15 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Amsterdam [10/33/1]
[230]
1998-08-29 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg3–27 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Sydney [11/21/5]

2000s

[330]
2001-05-26 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg19–41 Flag of England.svg  England TG Millner Field, Sydney [12/74/2]
[321]
2001-06-02 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg5–15 Flag of England.svg  England Newcastle, NSW [13/75/3]
[363]
2002-05-13 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg30–0 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Barcelona [14/65/1]
[371]
2002-05-18 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg3–36 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Barcelona [15/30/6]
[382]
2002-05-21 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0–18 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Barcelona [16/43/2]
[391]
2002-05-25 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg30–0 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Barcelona [17/66/2]
[563]
2006-08-31 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg68–12 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [18/7/1]
[568]
2006-09-04 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg10–24 Flag of France.svg  France Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [19/108/2]
[575]
2006-09-08 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg6–10 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [20/57/3]
[579]
2006-09-12 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg12–29 Flag of the United States.svg  United States St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [21/58/4]
[583]
2006-09-16 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg18–14 IRFU flag.svg  Ireland Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [22/79/2]
[645]
2007-10-16 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg21–10 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Cooks Gardens, Wanganui [48/23/7]
[646]
2007-10-20 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg29–12 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Wellington [49/24/8]
[717]
2008-07-22 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg3–37 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Canberra [25/50/9]
[718]
2008-07-26 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg16–22 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Sydney [26/51/10]
[760]
2009-08-08  (WCQ) Samoa  Flag of Samoa.svg0–87 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Samoa [14/27/1]

2010s

[835]
2010-08-20 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg26–12 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [28/132/2]
[844]
2010-08-24 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg5–32 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [29/55/11]
[850]
2010-08-28 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg62–0 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Surrey Sports Park, Guildford [30/22/2]
[858]
2010-09-01 (WC) England  Flag of England.svg15–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Twickenham Stoop [167/31/4]
[863]
2010-09-05 (WC) France  Flag of France.svg8–22 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Twickenham Stoop [150/32/3]
[1046]
2014-06-01 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg38–3 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Rotorua International Stadium [68/33/12]
[1047]
2014-06-06 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg0–22 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Tauranga, New Zealand[34/101/1]
[1059]
2014-08-01 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg26–3 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa CNR, Marcoussis Pitch 1[35/36/3]
[1064]
2014-08-05 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg25–3 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales CNR, Marcoussis Pitch 2[36/159/3]
[1074]
2014-08-09 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg3–17 Flag of France.svg  France CNR, Marcoussis Pitch 1[37/189/4]
[1079]
2014-08-13 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg20–23 Flag of the United States.svg  United States CNR, Marcoussis Pitch 1[38/99/5]
[1084]
2014-08-17 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg30–3 Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales CNR, Marcoussis Pitch 1[39/162/4]
[1159]
2016-10-22 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg67–3 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Eden Park, Auckland [80/40/13]
[1160]
2016-10-26 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg29–3 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia QBE Stadium, North Harbour [81/41/14]
[1195]
2017-06-09 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg10–53 Flag of England.svg  England Porirua Park, Wellington [42/245/5]
[1197]
2017-06-13 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg44–17 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Rugby Park, Christchurch [86/43/15]
[1199]
2017-06-17 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg5–45 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Smallbone Park, Rotorua [44/122/2]
[1208]
2017-08-09 (WC) Ireland  IRFU flag.svg19–17 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia UCD Bowl, Dublin [151/45/3]
[1215]
2017-08-13 (WC) France  Flag of France.svg48 – 0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia UCD Bowl, Dublin [215/46/5]
[1220]
2017-08-17 (WC) Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg21–15 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Billings Park UCD, Dublin [47/47/1]
[1224]
2017-08-22 (WC) Ireland  IRFU flag.svg24–36 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Ravenhill Stadium, Belfast [154/48/4]
[1227]
2017-08-26 (WC) Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg43–12 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Queen's University, Belfast [122/49/3]
[1265]
2018-08-18 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg11–31 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand ANZ Stadium, Sydney [50/93/16]
[1266]
2018-08-25 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg45–17 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Eden Park, Auckland [94/51/17]
[1329]
2019-07-13 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg34–5 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Sportsground 2, Newcastle [52/50/2]
[1334]
2019-07-19 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg46–3 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan North Sydney Oval, Sydney [53/51/3]
[1339]
2019-08-10 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg10–47 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Optus Stadium, Perth [54/102/18]
[1342]
2019-08-17 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg37–8 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Eden Park, Auckland [103/55/19]

2020s

[ Test:TBC] 2020-07-18
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svgFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
NQ Stadium, Townsville [-/-/-]
[ Test:TBC] 2020-08-08
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svgFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
TBC [-/-/-]

Other matches

2016-10-18
Auckland 600px Bianco e Blu a strisce Orizzontali.png 19–21Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Bell Park, Pakuranga

Squads

Current squad

TBA

Previous squads

2016 Wallaroos squad composition for the Women's Bledisloe Cup [3] [4]

Squad:

  • 1. Louise Burrows
  • 2. Alanna Patison
  • 3. Hanna Ngaha
  • 4. Alisha Hewett
  • 5. Chloe Butler
  • 6. Grace Hamilton
  • 7. Ariana Kaiwai
  • 8. Mollie Gray
  • 9. Iliseva Batibasaga
  • 10. Ash Hewson
  • 11. Madeline Putz
  • 12. Sarah Riordan
  • 13. Katrina Barker
  • 14. Cobie-Jane Morgan
  • 15. Chloe Leaupepe

Finishers:

  • 16. Ivy Kaleta
  • 17. Emily Robinson
  • 18. Danielle Meskell
  • 19. Michelle Bailey
  • 20. Liz Patu
  • 21. Kirby Sefo
  • 22. Nareta Marsters
  • 23. Cheyenne Campbell
Squad to 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup [7]

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.
Player Position Date of birth (age)CapsClub/province
Louise Burrows Hooker 11 March 1978 Flag of the Australian Capital Territory.svg Royals RU
Margaret Watson Hooker 18 December 1986 Flag of New South Wales.svg University of Newcastle
Danielle Meskell Prop 13 November 1973 Flag of New South Wales.svg Warringah Rats
Shannon Parry Prop 27 October 1989 Flag of Queensland.svg Redlands RUC
Oneata Schwalger Prop 4 July 1985 Flag of Victoria (Australia).svg Melbourne Unicorns
Caroline Vakalahi Prop 4 January 1983 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australian Services RU
Sharni Williams Prop 2 March 1988 Flag of the Australian Capital Territory.svg Royals RU
Rebecca Clough Lock 14 November 1988 Flag of Western Australia.svg Cottesloe RUC
Alisha Hewett Lock 26 December 1985 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australian Services RU
Brooke Saunders Lock 23 April 1985 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australian Services RU
Chloe Butler Flanker 11 April 1987 Flag of New South Wales.svg Parramatta Two Blues
Dalena Dennison Flanker 26 December 1985 Flag of Queensland.svg Sunnybank Dragons
Mollie Gray Flanker 29 September 1989 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australian Services RU
Michelle Milward Flanker 10 January 1986 Flag of New South Wales.svg Queanbeyan Whites
Liz Patu Flanker 15 July 1989 Flag of Victoria (Australia).svg Western Bulldogs
Rebecca Smyth Flanker 8 February 1985 Flag of New South Wales.svg Dubbo Rhinos
Nita Maynard Scrum-half 7 July 1992 Flag of New South Wales.svg Parramatta Two Blues
Tui Ormsby Scrum-half 20 January 1978 Flag of New South Wales.svg Warringah Rats
Cheyenne Campbell Centre 10 September 1986 Flag of Queensland.svg Redlands RUC
Ashley Marsters Centre 2 November 1993 Flag of Victoria (Australia).svg Melbourne Unicorns
Cobie-Jane Morgan Centre 29 June 1989 Flag of New South Wales.svg Warringah Rats
Natasha Haines Wing 23 December 1981 Flag of Western Australia.svg Cottesloe RUC
Madeline Putz Wing 18 September 1989 Flag of Western Australia.svg Kalamunda RUC
Tricia Brown Fullback 14 March 1979 Flag of Queensland.svg University of Queensland
Ashleigh Hewson Fullback 18 December 1979 Flag of New South Wales.svg Sydney University

Records

Coaches

  • Dwayne Nestor (2018–present) [9]
  • Paul Verrell (2013–2017) [10]
  • no appointment (Oct 2010 to Aug 2013)
  • John Manenti (2009–2010)
  • Steve Hamson (2005–2008)
  • no appointment (Jul 2002 to Jun 2005)
  • Don Parry (c. 2000–2002) [11]
  • no appointment (Sep 1998 to c. Dec 2000)
  • Bob Hitchcock (c. 1998) [12]

Captains

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Cambridge, Marty (28 June 2017). "Sevens speedster named in World Cup Squad". Rugby.com.au. Retrieved 1 September 2017.
  2. Cambridge, Marty (28 June 2017). "Sevens speedster named in World Cup Squad". Rugby.com.au. Retrieved 1 September 2017.
  3. http://www.greenandgoldrugby.com/wednesdays-rugby-news-155/
  4. http://www.rugby.com.au/news/2016/10/25/00/00/wallaroos-black-ferns-albany-team-announcement
  5. http://www.greenandgoldrugby.com/wednesdays-rugby-news-155/
  6. http://www.rugby.com.au/news/2016/10/25/00/00/wallaroos-black-ferns-albany-team-announcement
  7. IRB (2014). "Australia Squad". Archived from the original on 26 August 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  8. IRB (2014). "Australia Squad". Archived from the original on 26 August 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  9. Decent, Tom (13 February 2018). "New Wallaroos coach Dwayne Nestor says hosting 2021 Women's Rugby World Cup would be a 'fairytale'". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax. Archived from the original on 13 February 2018. Retrieved 13 February 2018.
  10. "Team Profile: Australia". Irish Rugby. 26 June 2017. Archived from the original on 27 August 2017. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  11. "Women's Rugby World Cup: Pool A". International Rugby Board. 2002. Archived from the original on 5 August 2002. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  12. "Teams: Australia". Women's Rugby World Cup. 1998. Archived from the original on 24 August 2006. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  13. Robinson, Georgina (21 June 2019). "Amazing Grace: New Wallaroos captain's rapid rise to the top". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 23 June 2019.
  14. Tiernan, Eamonn (13 August 2018). "Kiwi-born Liz Patu named new Wallaroos skipper". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 5 March 2019. Retrieved 5 March 2019.