Eilean Glas Lighthouse

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Eilean Glas Lighthouse
Scalpay - Eilean Glas lighthouse.jpg
Eilean Glas lighthouse
Outer Hebrides UK relief location map.jpg
Lighthouse icon centered.svg
Outer Hebrides
Location Scalpay
Lewis and Harris
Outer Hebrides
Scotland [1]
Coordinates 57°51′25″N6°38′31″W / 57.856916°N 6.642069°W / 57.856916; -6.642069 Coordinates: 57°51′25″N6°38′31″W / 57.856916°N 6.642069°W / 57.856916; -6.642069
Year first constructed1789 (first)
Year first lit1824 (current by Robert Stevenson)
Automated1978
Deactivated1824 (first)
Constructionmasonry tower (current)
stone tower (first)
Tower shapecylindrical tower with balcony and lantern
Markings / patterntower with red and white bands, black lantern
Tower height30 metres (98 ft)
Focal height43 metres (141 ft)
Current lens catoptric sealed beam lamps
Intensity400,000 candela
Range23 nautical miles (43 km; 26 mi)
Characteristic Fl (3) W 20s.
Admiralty numberA3990
NGA number3868
ARLHS numberSCO-069
Managing agentNorthern Lighthouse Board [2] [3]
Heritagecategory A listed building  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

Eilean Glas Lighthouse is situated on the east coast of the island of Scalpay in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. It was one of the original four lights commissioned by the Commissioners of the Northern Lights, and the first in the Hebrides [1] (the others were Kinnaird Head, Mull of Kintyre and North Ronaldsay). These lighthouses were built by Thomas Smith. [1]

Scalpay, Outer Hebrides island off the Isle of Harris, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Scalpay is an island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.

Northern Lighthouse Board non-departmental public body responsible for marine navigation aids

The Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB) is the General Lighthouse Authority for Scotland and the Isle of Man. It is a non-departmental public body responsible for marine navigation aids around coastal areas.

Kinnaird Head

Kinnaird Head is a headland projecting into the North Sea, within the town of Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire on the east coast of Scotland. The 16th-century Kinnaird Castle was converted in 1787 for use as the Kinnaird Head Lighthouse, the first lighthouse in Scotland to be lit by the Commissioners of Northern Lights. Kinnaird Castle and the nearby Winetower were described by W. Douglas Simpson as two of the nine castles of the Knuckle, referring to the rocky headland of north-east Aberdeenshire. The lighthouse is a category A listed building. and the Winetower is a scheduled monument.

Contents

Eilean Glas light was first displayed in 1789. The original tower was replaced in 1824 by Smith's stepson Robert Stevenson. In 1852 the light was changed to a revolving system lens. The lighthouse was an early candidate for automation and this was carried out in 1978. Several of the original buildings have been sold off. [1] The fog signal was discontinued in the 1980s although the horn remains in place as a decoration.

Robert Stevenson (civil engineer) Scottish civil engineer and famed designer and builder of lighthouses

Robert Stevenson, FRSE, FGS, FRAS, FSA Scot, MWS was a Scottish civil engineer and famed designer and builder of lighthouses.

The 30-metre (98 ft) tower is painted with two distinctive broad red bands. Light is now from catoptric sealed beam lamps, (similar to car head lights) mounted on a gearless pedestal. [1]

Catoptrics

Catoptrics deals with the phenomena of reflected light and image-forming optical systems using mirrors. A catoptric system is also called a catopter (catoptre).

In 2004, the owners of the lighthouse building were convicted of theft and of running a fraudulent charity to pay for the mortgage on the property. [4] Their 3-year sentence was later reduced to 2 years at the Court of Appeal. [5] The local community of Scalpay are currently attempting a community buyout. [6] [ needs update ]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Eilean Glas Lighthouse". Northern Lighthouse Board . Retrieved 6 February 2016.
  2. Eilean Glas The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 18 May 2016
  3. Eilean Glas Northern Lighthouse Board. Retrieved 18 May 2016
  4. "Couple jailed for lighthouse scam". BBC News. 30 April 2004. Retrieved 23 December 2008.
  5. "Lighthouse fraud battle continues". BBC News. 23 September 2006. Retrieved 27 April 2009.
  6. "Islanders offered home as a 'free gift' from London owner" Senscot, quoting The Press and Journal of 18 Feb 2011. Retrieved 11 Mar 2011.