FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017

Last updated

FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017
FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017.png
Host city St. Moritz
Country Switzerland
Nations participating76
Athletes participating589
Events11
Opening ceremony 6 February 2017 (2017-02-06)
Closing ceremony19 February 2017 (2017-02-19)
Officially opened by Doris Leuthard
Alps location map.png
Red pog.svg
Piz Nair
Location in the Alps of Europe
Switzerland relief location map.jpg
Red pog.svg
Piz Nair
Location in Switzerland

The FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 were the 44th FIS Alpine World Ski Championships and were held from 6 to 19 February 2017 at Piz Nair in St. Moritz, Switzerland. The host city was selected at the FIS Congress in South Korea, on 31 May 2012. The other finalists were Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, and Åre, Sweden. [1]

Contents

It was the fifth Alpine World Ski Championships at St. Moritz, after 1934, 1948, 1974, and 2003.

Schedule and course information

All competitions of the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 took place on the St. Moritz home mountain Corviglia. [2]

Schedule

 Time  UTC+1 [3]
Events calendar [4]
EventsEvent days
MoTuWeThFrSaSuMoTuWeThFrSaSu
678910111213141516171819
February
Opening and closing ceremonies
Men
Downhill12:0013:30
SlalomRun 109:45
Run 213:00
Giant
slalom
Run 109:45
Run 213:30
Alpine
combined
Downhill
10:00
Slalom
13:00
Super-G12:00
Women
Downhill11:15
SlalomRun 109:45
Run 213:00
Giant
slalom
Run 109:45
Run 213:00
Alpine
combined
Downhill
10:00
Slalom
13:00
Super-G12:00
MixedTeam event12:00

Course information

DateRaceStart
elevation
Finish
elevation
Vertical
drop
Course
length
Average
gradient
Sun 12 FebDownhill – men2,745 m (9,006 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)705 m (2,313 ft)2.920 km (1.814 mi)
Sun 12 FebDownhill – women2,745 m (9,006 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)705 m (2,313 ft)2.633 km (1.636 mi)
Mon 13 FebDownhill – (AC) – men2,745 m (9,006 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)705 m (2,313 ft)2.920 km (1.814 mi)
Fri 10 FebDownhill – (AC) – women 2,590 m (8,497 ft) 2,040 m (6,693 ft) 550 m (1,804 ft) 2.059 km (1.279 mi)
Wed   8 FebSuper-G – men2,640 m (8,661 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)600 m (1,969 ft)1.920 km (1.193 mi)
Tue   7 FebSuper-G – women2,590 m (8,497 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)550 m (1,804 ft)2.059 km (1.279 mi)
Fri 17 FebGiant slalom – men2,385 m (7,825 ft)2,030 m (6,660 ft)355 m (1,165 ft)
Thu 16 FebGiant slalom – women2,385 m (7,825 ft)2,030 m (6,660 ft)355 m (1,165 ft)
Sun 19 FebSlalom – men2,220 m (7,283 ft)2,030 m (6,660 ft)190 m (623 ft)  
Sat 18 FebSlalom – women2,220 m (7,283 ft)2,030 m (6,660 ft)190 m (623 ft)  
Mon 13 FebSlalom – (AC) – men2,220 m (7,283 ft)2,040 m (6,693 ft)180 m (591 ft)  
Fri 10 FebSlalom – (AC) – women2,210 m (7,251 ft)2,030 m (6,660 ft)180 m (591 ft)  

Medal summary

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)3429
2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland  (SUI)*3227
3Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)2002
4Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)1113
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)1113
6Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia  (SLO)1001
7Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)0112
8Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein  (LIE)0101
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia  (SVK)0101
10Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0022
11Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0011
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)0011
Totals (12 nations)11111133

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill [5]
details
Beat Feuz
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
1:38.91 Erik Guay
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:39.03 Max Franz
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:39.28
Super-G [6]
details
Erik Guay
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:25.38 Kjetil Jansrud
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1:25.83 Manuel Osborne-Paradis
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
1:25.89
Giant slalom [7]
details
Marcel Hirscher
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:13.31 Roland Leitinger
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:13.56 Leif Kristian Haugen
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
2:14.02
Slalom [8]
details
Marcel Hirscher
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:34.75 Manuel Feller
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:35.43 Felix Neureuther
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
1:35.68
Alpine combined [9]
details
Luca Aerni
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2:26.33 Marcel Hirscher
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
2:26.34 Mauro Caviezel
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
2:26.39

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
Downhill [10]
details
Ilka Štuhec
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia
1:32.85 Stephanie Venier
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:33.25 Lindsey Vonn
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:33.30
Super-G [11]
details
Nicole Schmidhofer
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:21.34 Tina Weirather
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
1:21.67 Lara Gut
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
1:21.70
Giant slalom [12]
details
Tessa Worley
Flag of France.svg  France
2:05.55 Mikaela Shiffrin
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2:05.89 Sofia Goggia
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
2:06.29
Slalom [13]
details
Mikaela Shiffrin
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
1:37.27 Wendy Holdener
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
1:38.91 Frida Hansdotter
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
1:39.02
Alpine combined [14]
details
Wendy Holdener
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
1:58.88 Michelle Gisin
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
1:58.93 Michaela Kirchgasser
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
1:59.26

Mixed

EventGoldSilverBronze
Team event [15]
details
Flag of France.svg  France
Adeline Baud Mugnier
Nastasia Noens
Tessa Worley
Mathieu Faivre
Julien Lizeroux
Alexis Pinturault
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Tereza Jančová
Veronika Velez-Zuzulová
Petra Vlhová
Matej Falat
Adam Žampa
Andreas Žampa
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Frida Hansdotter
Maria Pietilä Holmner
Emelie Wikström
Mattias Hargin
Gustav Lundbäck
Andre Myhrer

Participating countries

A total of 77 countries are scheduled to compete. [16]

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References

  1. Ski WC 2017: St. Moritz awarded Ski World Championships 2017.
  2. Races technical details
  3. "Schedule". Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2017.
  4. "Alpine skiing World Championships 2017 calendar – Saint Moritz". Archived from the original on 17 March 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2017.
  5. Men's downhill results
  6. Men's super-G results
  7. Men's giant slalom results
  8. Men's slalom results
  9. Men's alpine combined results
  10. Women's downhill results
  11. Women's super-G results
  12. Women's giant slalom results
  13. Women's slalom results
  14. Women's alpine combined results
  15. Nations team event results
  16. "FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2017 St. Moritz Participating Nations" (PDF). stmoritz2017.ch. 10 February 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 February 2017. Retrieved 11 February 2017.

Coordinates: 46°30′22″N9°47′13″E / 46.506°N 9.787°E / 46.506; 9.787