Fixed-term election

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A fixed-term election is an election that occurs on a set date, and cannot be changed by incumbent politicians other than through exceptional mechanisms if at all.

Contents

Fixed-term elections are common for directly elected executive officers, such as directly elected mayors, governors and presidents, but less common for prime ministers and parliaments in a parliamentary system of government.

Examples

Maximum terms

A number of countries do not provide for fixed terms for elected officials, instead stipulating the maximum length of a term, permitting elections to be held more frequently as determined by the government. Such examples include the Australian House of Representatives, the Canadian House of Commons, the New Zealand Parliament, or the Folketing of Denmark, in each case the prime minister may advise the monarch to call an election earlier than the constitutional maximum term of the parliament. Before the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, the United Kingdom too practiced this system, which returned to the country following the Dissolution and Calling of Parliament Act 2022, albeit keeping the maximum five-year parliamentary term. [4]

See also

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References

  1. "When can the Next Federal Election be Held?". Antony Green's Election Blog. 29 June 2021. Retrieved 23 February 2022.
  2. Act of 20 September 1976, Article 10: "Elections to the European Parliament shall be held on the date and at the times fixed by each Member State; for all Member States this date shall fall within the same period starting on a Thursday morning and ending on the following Sunday."
  3. "Chapter 5. The Federal Assembly". The Constitution of the Russian Federation.
  4. "Tried and tested system for calling elections restored". GOV.UK (Press release). 24 March 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.