Flindersia

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Flindersia
Flindersia australis.jpg
Fruit pods of F. australis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Subfamily: Flindersioideae
Genus:Flindersia
R.Br.
Species

See text

Flindersia is a genus of 17 species of trees in the family Rutaceae. They grow naturally in the Moluccas, New Guinea, Australia (New South Wales and Queensland) and New Caledonia.

Tree Perennial woody plant with elongated trunk

In botany, a tree is a perennial plant with an elongated stem, or trunk, supporting branches and leaves in most species. In some usages, the definition of a tree may be narrower, including only woody plants with secondary growth, plants that are usable as lumber or plants above a specified height. Trees are not a taxonomic group but include a variety of plant species that have independently evolved a woody trunk and branches as a way to tower above other plants to compete for sunlight. Trees tend to be long-lived, some reaching several thousand years old. In wider definitions, the taller palms, tree ferns, bananas, and bamboos are also trees. Trees have been in existence for 370 million years. It is estimated that there are just over 3 trillion mature trees in the world.

Rutaceae family of plants

The Rutaceae are a family, commonly known as the rue or citrus family, of flowering plants, usually placed in the order Sapindales.

New Guinea Island in the Pacific Ocean

New Guinea is a large island separated by a shallow sea from the rest of the Australian continent. It is the world's second-largest island, after Greenland, covering a land area of 785,753 km2 (303,381 sq mi), and the largest wholly or partly within the Southern Hemisphere and Oceania.

Contents

They are cultivated and planted for both timber and as street trees. The genus was named after explorer Matthew Flinders.

Matthew Flinders English navigator and cartographer

Captain Matthew Flinders was an English navigator and cartographer who led the first circumnavigation of Australia and identified it as a continent.

Species

This listing was sourced from the Australian Plant Name Index and scientific journal articles. [1] [2] [3] [4]

The Australian Plant Name Index (APNI) is an online database of all published names of Australian vascular plants. It covers all names, whether current names, synonyms or invalid names. It includes bibliographic and typification details, information from the Australian Plant Census including distribution by state, links to other resources such as specimen collection maps and plant photographs, and the facility for notes and comments on other aspects.

Flindersia amboinensis is a species of plant in the Rutaceae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. It is threatened by habitat loss.

<i>Flindersia australis</i> species of plant

Flindersia australis, the crow's ash or Australian teak, is a rainforest tree from New South Wales and Queensland in Australia. It grows up to 40 metres high, with larger trees having a buttressed trunk. The leaves are alternate or occasionally opposite and have between 3 and 13 leaflets. Each of these is 2.4 to 13 cm long and 0.8 to 4.3 cm wide. Flowers appear during spring forming inflorescences to 15 cm long. These have white or cream petals which are between 5 and 7 mm long. Both the petals and sepals are covered with hair. The flowers are followed by woody capsules which are 7 to 10 cm long. These split open to reveal the winged seeds.

<i>Flindersia bennettii</i> species of plant

Flindersia bennettii is an Australian rainforest tree in the citrus family. It is known as the Bennett's Ash, named after the naturalist, Dr. George Bennett.

Related Research Articles

<i>Canarium</i> genus of trees in the family Burseraceae

Canarium is a genus of about 100 species of tropical and subtropical trees, in the family Burseraceae. They grow naturally across tropical Africa, south and southeast Asia, Indochina, Malesia, Australia and western Pacific Islands; including from southern Nigeria east to Madagascar, Mauritius, Sri Lanka and India; from Burma, Malaysia and Thailand through the Malay Peninsula and Vietnam to south China, Taiwan and the Philippines; through Borneo, Indonesia, Timor and New Guinea, through to the Solomon Islands, New Caledonia, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Palau.

<i>Cupaniopsis</i> genus of plants

Cupaniopsis is a genus of about 67 species of trees and shrubs known to science, of the soapberry plant family Sapindaceae. They grow naturally in New Guinea, New Caledonia, Australia, Torres Strait Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Sulawesi, Micronesia. Many species have been threatened with extinction globally or nationally, with official recognition by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and several national and state governments.

<i>Diploglottis</i> genus of plants

Diploglottis is a genus of 10 species of trees known to science, constituting part of the plant family Sapindaceae. They grow naturally in rainforests and margins of adjoining humid forests in eastern Australia and New Guinea. Some species are known as native tamarind or small-leaved tamarind; they have no direct relationship with the true tamarind.

<i>Elattostachys</i> genus of plants

Elattostachys is a genus of about 21 species of trees known to science, constituting part of the plant family Sapindaceae.

<i>Lepiderema</i> genus of plants

Lepiderema is a genus of nine species of trees known to science, constituting part of the plant family Sapindaceae. As of November 2013 botanists know of seven species growing naturally in Australia and two species in New Guinea. Published botanical science provides a limited knowledge of the full range of diversity in Australia and especially in New Guinea. In New Guinea the two known species have descriptions based each on only a single type specimen collection. Therefore, collection of more specimens and more species is most likely in New Guinea. In Australia they grow in rainforests of the northern half of the east coast side of the Great Dividing Range, from north eastern New South Wales through to north eastern Queensland.

<i>Mischocarpus</i> genus of plants

Mischocarpus is a genus of about nineteen species of trees known to science, constituting part of the plant family Sapindaceae. They grow naturally from Australia and New Guinea, though Malesia as far north as the Philippines, through SE. Asia, Indo-China and S. China, to India at their farthest west. The eleven Australian species known to science grow naturally in the rainforests of the eastern coastal zone of New South Wales and Queensland, from Newcastle northwards through to north-eastern Queensland and Cape York Peninsula.

Flindersia ifflana is a species of plant in the Rutaceae family. It is found in Queensland (Australia) and Papua New Guinea. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Flindersia pimenteliana is a species of plant in the Rutaceae family. It may be known by the common name Maple Silkwood. The common name Maple Silkwood may also refer to Flindersia australis, Flindersia brayleyana or Flindersia pubescens. It is found in Queensland (Australia), West Papua (Indonesia), and Papua New Guinea. It is threatened by habitat loss.

<i>Flindersia schottiana</i> species of plant

Flindersia schottiana is a species of plant in the Rutaceae family. It is found in Australia, West Papua (Indonesia), and Papua New Guinea. It is threatened by habitat loss in New Guinea but it is still fairly common in northern New South Wales and southern Queensland, where it is grown as a street tree.

<i>Gmelina</i> genus of plants

Gmelina is a genus of plants in family Lamiaceae. It consists of about 35 species in Australia, New Guinea, New Caledonia, Southeast Asia, India and a few in Africa. Some species such as G. arborea have been planted and/or become naturalised in India, Africa and Australia. It was named by Carl Linnaeus in honour of botanist Johann Georg Gmelin.

<i>Lepidosperma</i> genus of plants

Lepidosperma is a genus of flowering plant of the family Cyperaceae. Most of the species are endemic to Australia, with others native to southern China, southeast Asia, New Guinea, New Caledonia and New Zealand.

<i>Flindersia brayleyana</i> species of plant

Flindersia brayleyana or Queensland maple is a species of plant in the Rutaceae family. It is found in northern Queensland in Australia. It grows up to 15 metres tall with a spreading crown. The tree is generally protected since the main areas in which this tree occurs have received World Heritage listing.

<i>Trochocarpa</i> genus of plants

Trochocarpa is a genus of shrubs or small trees, of the plant family Ericaceae. They occur naturally through coastal and montane eastern Australian rainforests and mountain shrublands and in New Guinea, Borneo and Sulawesi (Malesia).

<i>Vittadinia</i> genus of plants

Vittadinia is a genus of Australian and New Zealand plants in the aster tribe within the daisy family.

<i>Flindersia maculosa</i> species of plant

Flindersia maculosa is a tree in the citrus family. It is found in arid and semi arid areas in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. Because of the spotted bark, it is known as the leopardwood or leopard tree.

<i>Phaleria</i> genus of plants

Phaleria is flowering plant genus of about 20 species in the family Thymelaeaceae.

<i>Sarcopteryx</i> genus of plants

Sarcopteryx is a genus of about 12 rainforest tree species known to science, of the plant family Sapindaceae. They occur in Australia, New Guinea and the Moluccas.

<i>Flindersia xanthoxyla</i> species of plant

Flindersia xanthoxyla is an Australian rainforest tree in the citrus family. It is known as the long jack or yellowwood. It occurs mainly in dry rainforest or littoral rainforest. However, it also occurs in sub tropical rainforest such as Davis Scrub Nature Reserve. The species name xanthoxyla means "yellow wood". The natural range of distribution is from the Richmond River, New South Wales to Gympie in south eastern Queensland.

Rhysotoechia is a genus of tropical rainforest trees, constituting part of the plant family Sapindaceae.

<i>Haemodorum</i> genus of plants

Haemodorum is a genus of herbs in the family Haemodoraceae, first described as a genus in 1798. It is native to New Guinea and Australia. The type species is Haemodorum corymbosum Vahl.

  1. Haemodorum austroqueenslandicumDomin - SE Queensland, NE New South Wales
  2. Haemodorum brevicauleF.Muell. - Queensland, Northern Territory, N Western Australia
  3. Haemodorum brevisepalumBenth. - SW Western Australia
  4. Haemodorum coccineumR.Br. - New Guinea, Queensland, Northern Territory
  5. Haemodorum corymbosumVahl - New South Wales
  6. Haemodorum discolorT.D.Macfarl. - SW Western Australia
  7. Haemodorum distichophyllumHook. - Tasmania
  8. Haemodorum ensifoliumF.Muell. - NW Northern Territory, N Western Australia
  9. Haemodorum gracileT.D.Macfarl. - N Western Australia
  10. Haemodorum laxumR.Br. - SW Western Australia
  11. Haemodorum loratumT.D.Macfarl. - SW Western Australia
  12. Haemodorum paniculatumLindl. - SW Western Australia
  13. Haemodorum parviflorumBenth. - N Northern Territory, N Western Australia
  14. Haemodorum planifoliumR.Br. - SE Queensland, New South Wales
  15. Haemodorum simplexLindl. - SW Western Australia
  16. Haemodorum simulansF.Muell. - SW Western Australia
  17. Haemodorum sparsiflorumF.Muell. - SW Western Australia
  18. Haemodorum spicatumR.Br. - SW Western Australia
  19. Haemodorum tenuifoliumA.Cunn. ex Benth. - SE Queensland, NE New South Wales
  20. Haemodorum venosumT.D.Macfarl. - SW Western Australia

References

  1. "Flindersia%". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), Integrated Botanical Information System (IBIS) database (listing by % wildcard matching of all taxa relevant to Australia). Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. Retrieved 1 Nov 2013.
  2. Hartley, Thomas G. (1969). "A revision of the genus Flindersia (Rutaceae)". Journal of the Arnold Arboretum. 50 (4): 481–526. Retrieved 1 Nov 2013.
  3. Hartley, Thomas G.; Hyland, Bernie P. M. (1975). "Additional notes on the genus Flindersia (Rutaceae)". Journal of the Arnold Arboretum. 56: 243–247. Retrieved 1 Nov 2013.
  4. Whiffin, Trevor (1982). "Variation and Evolution in the genus Flindersia (Rutaceae). I Review of the genus". Australian Journal of Botany. 30 (6): 635–643. doi:10.1071/bt9820635 . Retrieved 1 Nov 2013.

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