Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance

Last updated
Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance
Awarded forquality R&B songs
CountryUnited States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1968
Last awarded2011
Website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (previously called Best Rhythm and Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female) was an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, [1] to female recording artists for quality R&B songs. Awards in several categories are distributed annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position." [2]

Contents

According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award was presented to artists that performed "newly recorded solo R&B vocal performances". Solo numbers by members of an established group were not eligible for the award as "separate entries from the duo or group performances." [3] Albums were also considered for the accolade until 1992.

As a part of the major overhaul of Grammy categories, the award was discontinued in 2011. The Female R&B Vocal Performance category, Male R&B Vocal Performance category and all duo/group vocal performances in the R&B category shifted to the Best R&B Performance category in 2012. [4]

The Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide it is designed for solo, duo/groups or collaborative R&B recordings and is limited to singles or tracks only.

The award for the Best Female R&B Vocal Performance was first presented to Aretha Franklin at the 10th Grammy Awards ceremony in 1968 for the song "Respect". Franklin received the most wins with eleven, followed by Anita Baker with five. Franklin also holds the record for the most nominations with twenty-three, while Chaka Khan is second with eight nominations. Fantasia Barrino became the final recipient of the award, when her song "Bittersweet" won the award in 2011. The award was presented to artists from the United States each year.

Aretha Franklin American singer, songwriter, and pianist

Aretha Louise Franklin was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. Franklin began her career as a child singing gospel at New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan, where her father C. L. Franklin was minister. At the age of 18, she embarked on a secular musical career as a recording artist for Columbia Records. While Franklin's career did not immediately flourish, she found acclaim and commercial success after signing with Atlantic Records in 1966. Hit songs such as "Respect", "Chain of Fools", "Think", "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman", "I Never Loved a Man ", and "I Say a Little Prayer", propelled her past her musical peers. By the end of the 1960s, Aretha Franklin had come to be known as "The Queen of Soul".

Respect (song) Single by Otis Redding

"Respect" is a song written and originally released by American recording artist Otis Redding in 1965. The song became a 1967 hit and signature song for soul singer Aretha Franklin. The music in the two versions is significantly different, and through a few changes in the lyrics, the stories told by the songs have a different flavor. Redding's version is a plea from a desperate man, who will give his woman anything she wants. He won't care if she does him wrong, as long as he gets his due respect when he brings money home. However, Franklin's version is a declaration from a strong, confident woman, who knows that she has everything her man wants. She never does him wrong, and demands his "respect". Franklin's version adds the "R-E-S-P-E-C-T" chorus and the backup singers' refrain of "Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me...".

Anita Baker American singer-songwriter

Anita Denise Baker is an American singer-songwriter. Starting her career in the late 1970s with the funk band Chapter 8, Baker released her first solo album, The Songstress, in 1983. In 1986, she rose to stardom following the release of her platinum-selling second album, Rapture, which included the Grammy-winning single "Sweet Love". She is regarded as one of the most popular singers of soulful romantic ballads during the height of the quiet storm period of contemporary R&B in the 1980s. As of 2017, Baker has won eight Grammy Awards and has five platinum albums and one gold album. Her vocal range is contralto.

Recipients

Aretha Franklin was the first recipient of the award in 1968. In total, she has won the award eleven times, making her the artist with the most wins in the category. Arethafranklin.jpg
Aretha Franklin was the first recipient of the award in 1968. In total, she has won the award eleven times, making her the artist with the most wins in the category.
In 1976, Natalie Cole won the award for her song "This Will Be", only the second artist to win the award back then. Nataliecole2007.jpg
In 1976, Natalie Cole won the award for her song "This Will Be", only the second artist to win the award back then.
Thelma Houston became the third artist to win the award, in 1978. Thelma Houston.JPG
Thelma Houston became the third artist to win the award, in 1978.
Chaka Khan won the award in 1984 for her album Chaka Khan as well as in 1985 and 1993. Chaka Khan.jpg
Chaka Khan won the award in 1984 for her album Chaka Khan as well as in 1985 and 1993.
Anita Baker won the award first in 1987. In total, she has won the award five times, making her the artist with second most wins. AnitaBaker performing in 2008 cropped.JPG
Anita Baker won the award first in 1987. In total, she has won the award five times, making her the artist with second most wins.
Janet Jackson was nominated six times in the category, but did not win. Janet Jackson 4.jpg
Janet Jackson was nominated six times in the category, but did not win.
Vanessa L. Williams, five-time nominee in the category Vanessa Williams homezfoo.jpg
Vanessa L. Williams, five-time nominee in the category
Four-time award winner, Alicia Keys. Keys first won the award in 2002 for her song "Fallin'". Alicia Keys 2.jpg
Four-time award winner, Alicia Keys. Keys first won the award in 2002 for her song "Fallin'".
Toni Braxton has won the award four times since her debut in 1993. Toni Braxton 2009 VH1 Divas-2.jpg
Toni Braxton has won the award four times since her debut in 1993.
Whitney Houston's song "It's Not Right but It's Okay" won her the award in 2000, making her the first winner of the millennium. Whitney Houston Welcome Heroes 7 cropped.JPEG
Whitney Houston's song "It's Not Right but It's Okay" won her the award in 2000, making her the first winner of the millennium.
Beyonce Knowles' songs "Dangerously in Love 2" and "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" won her the awards in 2004 and 2010, respectively. Beyonce sings Listen.jpg
Beyoncé Knowles' songs "Dangerously in Love 2" and "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" won her the awards in 2004 and 2010, respectively.
Mariah Carey's chart topper "We Belong Together" won the award in 2006. Mariahangels.jpg
Mariah Carey's chart topper "We Belong Together" won the award in 2006.
Seven-time nominee, including two-time award winner Mary J. Blige. MaryJBligeJan2011.jpg
Seven-time nominee, including two-time award winner Mary J. Blige.
Fantasia Barrino became the last winner in the category, in 2011. She won the award for her song "Bittersweet". Fantasia Barrino.jpg
Fantasia Barrino became the last winner in the category, in 2011. She won the award for her song "Bittersweet".
Year [I] Performing artistsWorkNomineesRef.
1968 Aretha Franklin "Respect" [5]
1969 Aretha Franklin "Chain of Fools" [6]
1970 Aretha Franklin "Share Your Love with Me" [7]
1971 Aretha Franklin "Don't Play That Song" [8]
1972 Aretha Franklin "Bridge Over Troubled Water" [9]
1973 Aretha Franklin Young, Gifted And Black [10]
1974 Aretha Franklin "Master of Eyes (The Deepness of Your Eyes)" [11]
1975 Aretha Franklin "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing" [6]
1976 Natalie Cole "This Will Be" [6]
1977 Natalie Cole "Sophisticated Lady (She's a Different Lady)" [12]
1978 Thelma Houston "Don't Leave Me This Way" [13]
1979 Donna Summer "Last Dance" [14]
1980 Dionne Warwick "Déjà Vu" [15]
1981 Stephanie Mills "Never Knew Love Like This Before" [16]
1982 Aretha Franklin "Hold On! I'm Comin'" [17]
1983 Jennifer Holliday "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going" [18]
1984 Chaka Khan Chaka Khan [19]
1985 Chaka Khan "I Feel for You" [20]
1986 Aretha Franklin "Freeway of Love" [21]
1987 Anita Baker Rapture [22]
1988 Aretha Franklin Aretha [23]
1989 Anita Baker "Giving You the Best That I Got" [24]
1990 Anita Baker Giving You the Best That I Got [25]
1991 Anita Baker Compositions [26]
1992 Lisa Fischer
Patti LaBelle
"How Can I Ease the Pain"
Burnin'
[27]
1993 Chaka Khan The Woman I Am [28]
1994 Toni Braxton "Another Sad Love Song" [29]
1995 Toni Braxton "Breathe Again" [30]
1996 Anita Baker "I Apologize" [31]
1997 Toni Braxton "You're Makin' Me High" [32]
1998 Erykah Badu "On & On" [33]
1999 Lauryn Hill "Doo Wop (That Thing)" [34]
2000 Whitney Houston "It's Not Right but It's Okay" [35]
2001 Toni Braxton "He Wasn't Man Enough" [36]
2002 Alicia Keys "Fallin'" [37]
2003 Mary J. Blige "He Think I Don't Know" [38]
2004 Beyoncé Knowles "Dangerously in Love 2" [39]
2005 Alicia Keys "If I Ain't Got You" [40]
2006 Mariah Carey "We Belong Together" [41]
2007 Mary J. Blige "Be Without You" [42]
2008 Alicia Keys "No One" [43]
2009 Alicia Keys "Superwoman" [44]
2010 Beyoncé Knowles "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" [45]
2011 Fantasia Barrino "Bittersweet" [46]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also

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