Joe Ferguson

Last updated

Joe Ferguson
No. 12
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1950-04-23) April 23, 1950 (age 71)
Alvin, Texas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school: Woodlawn
College: Arkansas
NFL Draft: 1973  / Round: 3 / Pick: 57
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:196–209
Passing yards:29,817
Passer rating:68.4
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Joseph Carlton Ferguson Jr. (born April 23, 1950) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League.

Contents

Early years

Ferguson played high school football in Shreveport, Louisiana, for Woodlawn High School. He guided the Knights to the Louisiana High School Athletic Association Class AAA (the top classification at the time) state championship in 1968. Ferguson succeeded Terry Bradshaw as Woodlawn's starting quarterback.

Ferguson played college football at the University of Arkansas, where he held the school's single game record for most completions until broken in 2012 (31 against Texas A&M in 1971).

Professional career

The Buffalo Bills selected Ferguson in the third round of the 1973 NFL Draft. [1] Although he is most famous for playing with the Bills from 1973 to 1984, Ferguson also played three seasons for the Detroit Lions and two seasons for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and one final season with the Indianapolis Colts.

Ferguson placed in the top 10 in pass attempts five times, completions and passing yards four times, passing touchdowns six times, and yards per pass three times. At one time he shared, with Ron Jaworski, the NFL record for consecutive starts by a quarterback with 107, until he was replaced by Joe Dufek on September 30, 1984. He has a 1–3 record in the NFL postseason, winning against the New York Jets in 1981. His three losses came from the Cincinnati Bengals in those same 1981 playoffs, the San Diego Chargers the year before in 1980 (a game in which he played the entire contest with a sprained ankle), and in 1974 to the Pittsburgh Steelers. He retired after the 1990 season after playing only one game with the Colts.

In 1995, Ferguson briefly came out of retirement to serve as a backup quarterback for the San Antonio Texans of the Canadian Football League's South Division. Kay Stephenson, who had coached Ferguson in his last year in Buffalo, was coach of San Antonio at the time and needed an inexpensive backup who knew Stephenson's system after starter David Archer was injured midseason. [2]

In 1975 Ferguson tied Fran Tarkenton for the NFL lead with 25 touchdown passes and compiled a passer rating of 81.3. Ferguson also surpassed 20 touchdown passes in three other seasons: 1980, 1981, 1983. He finished his career with 196 touchdowns thrown and 209 interceptions.

NFL career statistics

Source: [3]

YearTeamGPGSRecordCompAttPctYardsTDTD%IntInt%LngY/AY/GRateSackSckYSck%4QCGWD
1973 BUF 14149−57316444.593942.4106.1425.767.145.82016410.921
1974 BUF 14149−511923251.31,588125.2125.2556.8113.469.03223512.133
1975 BUF 14148−616932152.62,426257.8177.6777.6173.381.3201535.913
1976 BUF 772−57415149.01,08696.010.7587.2155.190.011806.811
1977 BUF 14143−1122145748.42,803122.6245.3426.1200.254.2362737.311
1978 BUF 16165−1117533053.02,136164.8154.5926.5133.570.5292438.111
1979 BUF 16167−923845852.03,572143.1153.3847.8223.374.4433878.623
1980 BUF 161611−525143957.22,805204.6184.1696.4175.374.5131292.924
1981 BUF 161610−625249850.63,652244.8204.0677.3228.374.1151372.922
1982 BUF 994−514426454.51,59772.7166.1476.0177.456.3111054.011
1983 BUF 16168−828150855.32,995265.1254.9435.9187.269.3272665.033
1984 BUF 12111−1019134455.51,991123.5174.9685.8165.963.5353579.2
1985 DET 810−1315457.436423.735.6386.745.567.24356.9
1986 DET 642−27315547.194174.574.5736.1156.862.9101016.111
1988 TB 210−1314667.436836.512.2348.0184.0104.3182.1
1989 TB 520−2449048.953333.366.7695.9106.650.85375.3
1990 IND 100−02825.02100.0225.0132.6210.0000.0
Career18617179−922,3694,51952.429,8171964.32094.6926.6160.368.43122,7106.52024

Buffalo Bills records

Source: [4] [5]

League leading stats

Personal life

In May 2005, Ferguson was diagnosed with Burkitt's lymphoma cancer and underwent treatment at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. In January 2008, Ferguson was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. In February 2008, he was treated at M.D. Anderson in the intensive care unit for pneumonia. In July 2009, it was reported that Ferguson had recovered from his battles with cancer. [6]

Related Research Articles

Warren Moon American football quarterback

Harold Warren Moon is an American former gridiron football quarterback who played professionally for 23 seasons. He spent the majority of his career with the Houston Oilers of the National Football League (NFL) and the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League (CFL). In the NFL, Moon also played for the Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks, and Kansas City Chiefs.

John Willard Hadl is a former American football player, a quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League for sixteen seasons, with the San Diego Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and Houston Oilers. He also served as a punter for five seasons. He was an AFL All-Star four times and was selected to two Pro Bowls. Hadl played collegiately at the University of Kansas, and was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

Daryle Pasquale Lamonica is a former American football quarterback who played in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL) for 12 seasons, primarily with the Oakland Raiders. He spent his first four seasons mostly as a backup for the Buffalo Bills, who selected in the 24th round of the 1963 AFL Draft. Lamonica played his next eight seasons as the primary starter of the Raiders, including after they joined the NFL through the AFL–NFL merger.

Kenneth Allan Anderson is a former American football quarterback who spent his entire professional career playing for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL) and later returned as a position coach.

David Carr (American football) American football quarterback

David Duke Carr is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Houston Texans first overall in the 2002 NFL Draft. He played college football at Fresno State. Carr also played professionally for the Carolina Panthers, New York Giants, and San Francisco 49ers. He received a Super Bowl ring as a backup for the Giants after their victory over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLVI. He joined the NFL Network in 2016 as analyst.

Drew Bledsoe Former NFL Quarterback

Drew McQueen Bledsoe is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 14 seasons, primarily with the New England Patriots. He served as New England's starting quarterback from 1993 to 2001 and was considered the face of the Patriots franchise during his nine seasons with the team.

Larry Craig Morton is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 18 seasons, primarily with the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos. He played college football at California, receiving All-American honors, and was selected by the Cowboys fifth overall in the 1965 NFL Draft. Following nine seasons on the Cowboys, a quarterback controversy with Roger Staubach led to Morton joining the New York Giants for three seasons. Morton spent his final six seasons as a member of the Broncos, where he won NFL Comeback Player of the Year and AFC Offensive Player of the Year in 1977. After his 1982 retirement, he became a 1992 inductee of the College Football Hall of Fame. He was also named to the Broncos Ring of Fame in 1988.

James Warren Hart is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1966 through 1983 and the Washington Redskins in 1984.

Ryan Fitzpatrick American football quarterback

Ryan Joseph Fitzpatrick is an American football quarterback for the Washington Football Team of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Harvard, where he was the school's first quarterback to have over 1,000 rushing yards, and was selected by the St. Louis Rams in the seventh round of the 2005 NFL Draft.

Craig Nall

Craig Matthew Nall is a former American football quarterback. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fifth round of the 2002 NFL Draft. He played college football at LSU and Northwestern State. Nall also played for the Buffalo Bills, Houston Texans, and Florida Tuskers.

Rob Garland Johnson is a former professional American football quarterback and current assistant football coach at Mission Viejo High School. Johnson, a native of Orange County, California, played college football at the University of Southern California (USC) and was a fourth-round pick in the 1995 NFL Draft by the expansion team Jacksonville Jaguars.

Dennis Wendell Shaw is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Buffalo Bills, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants, and the Kansas City Chiefs.

William Alan Munson was an American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1964 through 1979. He also played college football for Utah State where he set multiple passing records as a senior in 1963.

Andy Dalton American football quarterback

Andrew Gregory "Andy" Dalton is an American football quarterback for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Texas Christian University (TCU), and in his final college game led TCU to a win in the 2011 Rose Bowl. Dalton is the all-time leader in wins at Texas Christian University.

Tyrod Taylor American football quarterback

Tyrod Di'allo Taylor is an American football quarterback for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Virginia Tech, leading the Hokies to the 2009 Orange Bowl as a Sophomore and 2011 Orange Bowl during his senior year. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft and served as the backup to starting quarterback Joe Flacco, including during the Ravens' Super Bowl XLVII victory over the San Francisco 49ers.

The 1984 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 15th season in the National Football League, and the 25th overall. The team started the season with eleven consecutive losses before an upset home win over Dallas in Week 12. The 1984 Bills gave up a team-record 454 points on defense, an average of more than 28 per game. The Bills gave up 30+ points eight times and allowed fewer than 20 points in a game only three times all season. The Bills also allowed sixty quarterback sacks, for a total of 554 yards, the most-ever at the time. The Bills’ 4,341 total yards gained was second-worst in the league in 1984. The 1984 Bills are one of only two NFL teams to have been outscored by 25 points six different times during the season. This season is notable for being Pete Carroll’s first NFL coaching experience.

Ryan Tannehill American football quarterback

Ryan Timothy Tannehill III is an American football quarterback for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Texas A&M transitioning from wide receiver to the team's starting quarterback. He was drafted eighth overall by the Miami Dolphins in the 2012 NFL Draft.

The 1977 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 18th season, and their eighth in the National Football League. The team posted a losing record for the second-consecutive season, and missed the postseason for the third season.

Sam Darnold American football quarterback

Samuel Richard Darnold is an American football quarterback for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at USC and was selected third overall by the New York Jets in the 2018 NFL Draft.

References

  1. "Football Notebook". St. Petersburg Times . July 27, 1973. pp. 3–C. Retrieved April 12, 2010.
  2. "SPORTS PEOPLE: FOOTBALL; Ferguson, 45, Signs C.F.L. Deal". The New York Times. August 3, 1995. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  3. "Joe Ferguson Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  4. "Buffalo Bills Career Passing Leaders". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  5. "Buffalo Bills Single-Season Passing Leaders". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  6. "Joe Ferguson talks Cancer, Jim Kelly". Buffalobills.com.