John B. Goodenough Award

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The John B. Goodenough Award is run biennially by the Royal Society of Chemistry and awards contributions to the field of materials chemistry. [1] The prize winner, chosen by the Materials Chemistry Division Awards Committee, receives a monetary reward, a medal, a certificate and completes a UK lecture tour.

Contents

Award history

The award, which was originally referred to as the Materials Chemistry Forum Lifetime Award, was set up in 2008. It was named after the materials scientist John Bannister Goodenough, who has made significant contributions to the development of the first random access memory and in the field of Li-ion rechargeable batteries. [2]

Previous winners

See also

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References

  1. "Royal Society of Chemistry - John B Goodenough Award". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  2. "The University of Texas at Austin - John B Goodenough". The University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  3. "Royal Society of Chemistry - John B Goodenough Award - 2009 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  4. "Royal Society of Chemistry - John B Goodenough Award - 2011 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  5. "Royal Society of Chemistry - John B Goodenough Award - 2013 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  6. "RSC John B Goodenough Award 2015 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. 5 May 2015. Retrieved 26 May 2015.
  7. "RSC John B Goodenough Award 2017 Winner". www.rsc.org. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  8. "RSC John B Goodenough Award 2019 Winner". www.rsc.org. Retrieved 2019-06-29.