List of Royal Society of Chemistry medals and awards

Last updated
RSC award medals have a variety of designs. This is the Robert Boyle Prize for Analytical Science. Royal Society of Chemistry - Robert Boyle Prize for Analytical Science - 2014 - Andy Mabbett - 01.JPG
RSC award medals have a variety of designs. This is the Robert Boyle Prize for Analytical Science.
Jeremy Knowles Award Royal Society of Chemistry - Jeremy Knowles Award - 2014 - Andy Mabbett - 02.JPG
Jeremy Knowles Award
Stephanie L Kwolek Award Royal Society of Chemistry - Stephanie L Kwolek Award - 2014 - Andy Mabbett - 03.JPG
Stephanie L Kwolek Award
The reverse of most medals is plain. This is the 2014 Stephanie L Kwolek Award. Royal Society of Chemistry - Stephanie L Kwolek Award - 2014 - Andy Mabbett - 04.JPG
The reverse of most medals is plain. This is the 2014 Stephanie L Kwolek Award.
The medals, made by Thomas Fattorini Ltd of Birmingham, are presented in a box. This is the Hickinbottom Award. Royal Society of Chemistry - Hickinbottom Award - 2014 - Andy Mabbett - 04.JPG
The medals, made by Thomas Fattorini Ltd of Birmingham, are presented in a box. This is the Hickinbottom Award.

The Royal Society of Chemistry grants a number of medals and awards.

Contents

All those named "prize" (except the Beilby Medal and Prize) are awarded with a £5,000 bursary. The Chemistry World Entrepreneur of the Year award has one of £4,000.

As of 2014, these are: [1]

Discontinued awards (incomplete list)

See also

Related Research Articles

Royal Society of Chemistry UK learned society

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) is a learned society in the United Kingdom with the goal of "advancing the chemical sciences". It was formed in 1980 from the amalgamation of the Chemical Society, the Royal Institute of Chemistry, the Faraday Society, and the Society for Analytical Chemistry with a new Royal Charter and the dual role of learned society and professional body. At its inception, the Society had a combined membership of 34,000 in the UK and a further 8,000 abroad. The headquarters of the Society are at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London. It also has offices in Thomas Graham House in Cambridge where RSC Publishing is based. The Society has offices in the United States at the University City Science Center, Philadelphia, in both Beijing and Shanghai, China and Bangalore, India.

Edward Frankland English chemist

Sir Edward Frankland, was a British chemist. He was one of the originators of organometallic chemistry and introduced the concept of combining power or valence. An expert in water quality and analysis, he was a member of the second royal commission on the pollution of rivers, and studied London's water quality for decades. He also studied luminous flames and the effects of atmospheric pressure on dense ignited gas, and was one of the discoverers of helium.

Royal Institute of Chemistry learned society

The Royal Institute of Chemistry was a British scientific organisation.

Richard R. Schrock American chemist

Richard Royce Schrock is an American chemist and Nobel laureate recognized for his contributions to the olefin metathesis reaction used in organic chemistry.

The Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI) is both the qualifying body in Australia for professional chemists and a learned society promoting the science and practice of chemistry in all its branches. The RACI hosts conferences, seminars and workshops. It is the professional body for chemistry in Australia, with the ability to award the status of Chartered Chemist (CChem) to suitably qualified candidates.

John Meurig Thomas Welsh chemist

Sir John Meurig Thomas or JMT is a British scientist, educator, university administrator, and historian of science primarily known for his work on heterogeneous catalysis, solid-state chemistry, and surface and materials science.

Malcolm Leslie Hodder Green was Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Oxford. He made many contributions to organometallic chemistry.

Tobin Jay Marks is the Vladimir N. Ipatieff Professor of Catalytic Chemistry and Professor of Material Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University. Among the themes of his research are synthetic organo-f-element and early-transition metal organometallic chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, molecule-based photonic materials, superconductivity, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and biological aspects of transition metal chemistry.

Robin Perutz FRS is a professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of York, where he was formerly head of department between 2000 and 2004. He is also the son of the Nobel Prize winner Max Perutz.

Sir Ronald Sydney Nyholm was an Australian chemist who was a leading figure in inorganic chemistry in the 1950s and 1960s.

Ei-ichi Negishi Japanese chemist

Ei-ichi Negishi is a Manchurian-born Japanese chemist who has spent most of his career at Purdue University in the United States. He is the Herbert C. Brown Distinguished Professor and Director of the Negishi-Brown Institute at Purdue. He is best known for his discovery of the Negishi coupling. He was awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for palladium catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis" jointly with Richard F. Heck and Akira Suzuki.

Francis Patrick Dwyer Australian professor of chemistry

Francis Patrick John "Frank" Dwyer FAA was Professor of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra. He was one of the most distinguished scientists Australia has produced. At the time of his death in 1962 he was widely recognised as a leading authority in inorganic chemistry, and had laid the foundation in Australia for a new field of research bridging science and medicine—biological inorganic chemistry. His influence as a teacher and as a researcher was widespread.

Faraday Lectureship Prize award granted by the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Faraday Lectureship Prize, previously known simply as the Faraday Lectureship, is awarded once every two years (approximately) by the Royal Society of Chemistry for "exceptional contributions to physical or theoretical chemistry". Named after Michael Faraday, the first Faraday Lecture was given in 1869, two years after Faraday's death, by Jean-Baptiste Dumas. As of 2009, the prize was worth £5000, with the recipient also receiving a medal and a certificate. As the name suggests, the recipient also gives a public lecture describing his or her work.

Graham John Hutchings FRS FIChemE FRSC FLSW is a British chemist, professor and Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research at Cardiff University.

The Beilby Medal and Prize is awarded annually to a scientist or engineer for work that has exceptional practical significance in chemical engineering, applied materials science, energy efficiency or a related field. The prize is jointly administered by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Society of Chemical Industry, who make the award in rotation.

The Nyholm Prize for Education commemorates the life and work of Australian-born chemist Sir Ronald Nyholm, who - alongside his research in coordination chemistry - passionately campaigned for the improvement of science education. He acted as President of the Royal Society of Chemistry from 1968 to 1970.

Javier Pérez-Ramírez materials scientist

Javier Pérez-Ramírez is a Professor of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering at ETH Zurich.

Elizabeth Joy New is an Australian chemist and Associate Professor of the School of Chemistry, University of Sydney. She won the 2018 Australian Museum 3M Eureka Prize.

References

  1. "Awards". Royal Society of Chemistry . Retrieved 20 November 2014.