Honorary Fellows of the Royal Society of Chemistry

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The Royal Society of Chemistry awards the designation of Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry for distinguished service in the field of chemistry.

Contents

Awardees are entitled to use the post nominal HonFRSC.

Recipients

Recipients have included: [1]

1952

1980

1983

1985

1986

1987

1989

1990

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

2000

2001

2002

Also in 2002, the fictional character Sherlock Holmes was awarded an "Extraordinary Honorary Fellowship". [3]

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

See also

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References

  1. "Our Honorary Fellows". Royal Society of Chemistry . Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  2. "Vita". www.mpibpc.mpg.de.
  3. "RSC press release: Sherlock Holmes honorary fellowship". Royal Society of Chemistry. 16 October 2002. Retrieved 1 October 2014.