Meldola Medal and Prize

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Meldola Medal and Prize
Sponsored by Royal Society of Chemistry
Date1921 (1921)
Reward(s)£500
Website www.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Awards/Archive/Meldola/

The Meldola Medal and Prize was awarded annually from 1921-1979 by the Chemical Society and from 1980–2008 by the Royal Society of Chemistry to a British chemist who was under 32 years of age for promising original investigations in chemistry (which had been published). It commemorated Raphael Meldola, President of the Maccabaeans and the Institute of Chemistry. The prize was the sum of £500 and a bronze medal. [1]

Contents

The prize was modified in 2008 and joined the Edward Harrison Memorial Prize to become the Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prizes.

Winners

Awardees include: [2]

See also

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