Sir George Stokes Award

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The Sir George Stokes Award (colloquially the Stokes Medal) is named after George Gabriel Stokes and is awarded biennially by the Analytical Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry. It was established in 1999 to recognize the multidisciplinary nature of analytical chemistry [1] and is given:

Contents

For outstanding and sustained contributions to analytical science by someone working in a complementary field, which has led to developments of seminal importance to chemical analysis.

There is no restriction on the nationality of those who can be considered for the award.

Winners

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry

See also

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References

  1. Sir George Stokes Medal Rules, RSC, retrieved September 21, 2008
  2. "2019 Sir George Stokes Award Winner-Professor Tuan Vo-Dinh". Royal Society of Chemistry . Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  3. "Sir George Stokes Award 2015 winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 7 May 2016.
  4. "Sir George Stokes Award 2013 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry . Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  5. "Sir George Stokes Award 2011 Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry . Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  6. Wang, Joseph; Rees, Neil V. (2015). "Professor Richard Compton's 60thBirthday". Electroanalysis. Wiley. 27 (4): 844–845. doi: 10.1002/elan.201580033 . ISSN   1040-0397.
  7. "2009 winner of the RSC Sir George Stokes Award - Robin Clark". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 9 October 2014.