Longstaff Prize

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The Longstaff Prize is given to a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry who has done the most to advance the science of chemistry. [1] First awarded in 1881, it was originally conferred by the Chemical Society and known as the Longstaff Medal.

Contents

Winners

Source: [2]

2019 Martyn Poliakoff [3]
2016 Paul O'Brien [4]
2013 Steven Ley [5]
2010 Jack Lewis [6]
2008 Jack Baldwin
2005 Alan Carrington [7]
2002 Robert Williams [8]
1999 Raymond Freeman
1996 John Meurig Thomas
1993 Harold Kroto
1990 Gordon Stone
1987 Geoffrey Wilkinson
1984 Alan Battersby
1981 George Porter
1978 Dorothy Hodgkin
1975 John Stuart Anderson
1972 Derek Barton
1969 Ronald Norrish
1966 John Monteath Robertson
1963 Alexander Todd
1960 Eric Rideal
1957 Edmund Hirst
1954 John Lennard-Jones
1951 Christopher Kelk Ingold
1948 Cyril Hinshelwood
1945 Nevil Sidgwick
1942 Hugh Stott Taylor
1939 Ian Heilbron
1936 George Barger
1933 Norman Haworth, James Irvine
1930 William Hobson Mills [9]
1927 Robert Robinson
1924 Frederick George Donnan
1921 Jocelyn Field Thorpe
1918 Arthur William Crossley  [ Wikidata ] [10]
1915 Martin Onslow Forster
1912 Herbert Brereton Baker [11]
1909 Frederic Kipping [12]
1906 Walter Noel Hartley [13]
1903 William Jackson Pope [14]
1900 William Henry Perkin Jr. [15]
1897 William Ramsay [16]
1894 Horace Tabberer Brown
1891 Francis Robert Japp [17]
1888 William Henry Perkin [18]
1884 Cornelius O'Sullivan [19]
1881   Thomas Edward Thorpe

See also

Related Research Articles

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Sir Ian Morris Heilbron DSO FRS was a Scottish chemist, who pioneered organic chemistry developed for therapeutic and industrial use.

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Steven Victor Ley CBE FRS FRSC is Professor of Organic Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge, and is a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. He was President of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2000–2002) and was made a CBE in January 2002, in the process. In 2011, he was included by The Times in the list of the "100 most important people in British science".

Martyn Poliakoff British chemist

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David Leigh (scientist) British scientist

David Alan Leigh FRS FRSE FRSC is a British chemist, Royal Society Research Professor and, since 2014, the Sir Samuel Hall Chair of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Manchester. He was previously the Forbes Chair of Organic Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh (2001–2012) and Professor of Synthetic Chemistry at the University of Warwick (1998–2001).

Sir Jocelyn Field Thorpe FRS [1] was a British chemist who made major contributions to organic chemistry., including the Thorpe-Ingold effect and three named reactions.

Dame Lynn Faith Gladden is the Shell Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Cambridge. She served as Pro-vice-chancellor for research from 2010 to 2016. Since October 2018 she has been executive chair at the EPSRC.

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Polly Arnold British chemist

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David Parker (chemist) Professor David Parker FRS, Department of Chemistry, Durham University

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Paul OBrien (chemist) Professor of Inorganic Materials and head of the School of Chemistry at the University of Manchester

Paul O'Brien was professor of Inorganic Materials at the University of Manchester. where he has served as head of the School of Chemistry from 2004 to 2009 and head of the School of Materials from 2011 to 2015. He died on 16 October 2018 at the age of 64.

Stephen Mann, FRS, FRSC, is Professor of Chemistry, Director of the Centre for Organized Matter Chemistry, Director of the Centre for Protolife Research, and was Principal of the Bristol Centre for Functional Nanomaterials at the University of Bristol, UK.

Elizabeth A. H. Hall

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Rachel O'Reilly is a British chemist and Professor at the University of Birmingham. She works at the interface of biology and materials, creating polymers that can mimic natural nanomaterials such as viruses and cells. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

References

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  2. "RSC Longstaff Prize Previous Winners". The Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  3. "2019 Longstaff Prize Winner". Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  4. Chilton, Alexander. The University of Manchester Magazine. The University of Manchester https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/magazine/features/a-tale-of-two-continents/ . Retrieved 1 July 2019.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. "Prof Steven V. Ley CBE FMedSci FRS". www.leygroup.ch.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  6. Clark, Robin J. H.; Raithby, Paul R. (24 February 2016). "Jack Lewis, Baron Lewis of Newnham HonFRSC. 13 February 1928 -- 17 July 2014" (PDF). Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  7. "Obituary of Professor Alan Carrington CBE CChem FRSC FRS". The Royal Society of Chemistry. 6 January 1934. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  8. Hill, H. A. O.; Thomson, A. J. (24 August 2016). "Robert Joseph Paton Williams MBE. 25 February 1926 -- 21 March 2015" (PDF). Biogr. Mems Fell. R. Soc. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
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  10. "Arthur William Crossley". Graces Guide. 25 March 1926. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
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  15. "Proceedings of the Chemical Society, Vol. 16, No. 222". Proceedings of the Chemical Society (London). Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). 16 (222): 81. 1900. doi:10.1039/pl9001600077. ISSN   0369-8718.
  16. "Proceedings of the Chemical Society, Vol. 13, No. 175". Proceedings of the Chemical Society (London). Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). 13 (175): 42. 1897. doi:10.1039/pl8971300041. ISSN   0369-8718.
  17. "Proceedings of the Chemical Society, Vol. 7, No. 96". Proceedings of the Chemical Society (London). Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). 7 (96): 54. 1891. doi:10.1039/pl8910700053. ISSN   0369-8718.
  18. "Abstracts of the Proceedings of the Chemical Society, Vol. 4, No. 51". Proceedings of the Chemical Society (London). Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). 4 (51): 42. 1888. doi:10.1039/pl8880400041. ISSN   0369-8718.
  19. "Obituary". The Analyst. Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). 32 (372): 73. 1907. Bibcode:1907Ana....32...73.. doi:10.1039/an9073200073. ISSN   0003-2654.