Tomas Lindahl

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Tomas Lindahl
Tomas Lindahl 0113.jpg
Tomas Lindahl at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2015)
Born
Tomas Robert Lindahl

(1938-01-28) 28 January 1938 (age 81) [1]
Stockholm, Sweden
Nationality Swedish, naturalised British
(dual nationality)
Alma mater
Known forClarification of cellular resistance to carcinogens
Awards
Scientific career
Fields
Institutions
Thesis On the structure and stability of nucleic acids in solution  (1967)
Influences Walter Bodmer
Website crick.ac.uk/research/a-z-researchers/emeritus-scientists/tomas-lindahl/

Tomas Robert Lindahl FRS [3] FMedSci [5] (born 28 January 1938) is a Swedish-born British scientist specialising in cancer research. [7] In 2015, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry [8] jointly with American chemist Paul L. Modrich and Turkish chemist Aziz Sancar for mechanistic studies of DNA repair. [9] [10] [11]

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

Cancer research research into cancer to identify causes and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure

Cancer research is research into cancer to identify causes and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry One of the five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Alfred Nobel

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to scientists in the various fields of chemistry. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895, awarded for outstanding contributions in chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine. This award is administered by the Nobel Foundation, and awarded by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on proposal of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry which consists of five members elected by Academy. The award is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death.

Contents

Education

Lindahl was born in Kungsholmen, Stockholm, Sweden to Folke Robert Lindahl and Ethel Hulda Hultberg. [12] He received a PhD degree in 1967, [13] and an MD degree qualification in 1970, from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. [1]

Kungsholmen island in the Lake Mälaren in Stockholm, Sweden

Kungsholmen is an island in Lake Mälaren in Sweden, part of central Stockholm. It is situated north of Riddarfjärden and considered part of the historical province Uppland. Its area is 3.9 km2 (1.5 sq mi) with a perimeter of 8.9 km (5.5 mi). The highest point is at Stadshagsplan at 47 metres (154 ft). The total population is 56,754.

Stockholm Capital city in Södermanland and Uppland, Sweden

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous urban area in the Nordic countries; 960,031 people live in the municipality, approximately 1.5 million in the urban area, and 2.3 million in the metropolitan area. The city stretches across fourteen islands where Lake Mälaren flows into the Baltic Sea. Just outside the city and along the coast is the island chain of the Stockholm archipelago. The area has been settled since the Stone Age, in the 6th millennium BC, and was founded as a city in 1252 by Swedish statesman Birger Jarl. It is also the capital of Stockholm County.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, formally the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Scandinavian Nordic country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.2 million of which 2.4 million has a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the southern half of the country.

Career and research

After obtaining his research doctorate, Lindahl did postdoctoral research at Princeton University and Rockefeller University. [14] He was professor of medical chemistry at the University of Gothenburg 1978–82. After moving to the United Kingdom he joined the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK) as a researcher in 1981. [14] From 1986 to 2005 he was the first Director of Cancer Research UK's Clare Hall Laboratories in Hertfordshire, since 2015 part of the Francis Crick Institute. [15] He continued to research there until 2009. He has contributed to many papers on DNA repair and the genetics of cancer. [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24]

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

Rockefeller University Research institute in New York City

The Rockefeller University is a center for scientific research, primarily in the biological and medical sciences, that provides doctoral and postdoctoral education. Rockefeller is the oldest biomedical research institute in the United States. The 82-person faculty has 37 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 17 members of the National Academy of Medicine, seven Lasker Award recipients, and five Nobel laureates. As of 2017, a total of 36 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Rockefeller University.

University of Gothenburg university in Gothenburg, Sweden

The University of Gothenburg is a university in Sweden's second largest city, Gothenburg.

Awards and honours

Lindahl was elected an EMBO Member in 1974 [2] and Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1988, [4] his certificate of election reads:

Lindahl received the Royal Society's Royal Medal in 2007 "making fundamental contributions to our understanding of DNA repair. His achievements stand out for their great originality, breadth and lasting influence." [25] He is a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. [26] He was awarded the Copley Medal in 2010. He was elected a founding Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (FMedSci) in 1998. In 2018, he was elected a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences.

Royal Medal silver-gilt medal, of which three are awarded each year by the Royal Society

The Royal Medal, also known as The King's Medal and The Queen's Medal, is a silver-gilt medal, of which three are awarded each year by the Royal Society, two for "the most important contributions to the advancement of natural knowledge" and one for "distinguished contributions in the applied sciences", done within the Commonwealth of Nations. The award was created by George IV and awarded first during 1826. Initially there were two medals awarded, both for the most important discovery within the year previous, a time period which was lengthened to five years and then shortened to three. The format was endorsed by William IV and Victoria, who had the conditions changed during 1837 so that mathematics was a subject for which a Royal Medal could be awarded, albeit only every third year. The conditions were changed again during 1850 so that:

... the Royal Medals in each year should be awarded for the two most important contributions to the advancement of Natural Knowledge, published originally in Her Majesty's dominions within a period of not more than ten years and not less than one year of the date of the award, subject, of course, to Her Majesty's approval. ... in the award of the Royal Medals, one should be given in each of the two great divisions of Natural Knowledge.

Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters academy of sciences

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters is a learned society based in Oslo, Norway.

Copley Medal award given by the Royal Society of London

The Copley Medal is an award given by the Royal Society, for "outstanding achievements in research in any branch of science." It alternates between the physical and the biological sciences. Given every year, the medal is the oldest Royal Society medal awarded and the oldest surviving scientific award in the world, having first been given in 1731 to Stephen Gray, for "his new Electrical Experiments: – as an encouragement to him for the readiness he has always shown in obliging the Society with his discoveries and improvements in this part of Natural Knowledge".

He shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2015. [9] The Swedish Academy noted that "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 was awarded jointly to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar 'for mechanistic studies of DNA repair'." [27]

Related Research Articles

Cancer Research UK charity which conducts research on cancer

Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness charity in the United Kingdom and Isle of Man, formed on 4 February 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. Its aim is to reduce the number of deaths from cancer. As the world's largest independent cancer research charity it conducts research into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Research activities are carried out in institutes, universities and hospitals across the UK, both by the charity's own employees and by its grant-funded researchers. It also provides information about cancer and runs campaigns aimed at raising awareness of the disease and influencing public policy.

Alan Fersht British chemist

Sir Alan Roy Fersht, FRS, FMedSci is a British chemist at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology and an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge. He works on protein folding. Former Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.

John Gurdon developmental biologist

Sir John Bertrand Gurdon, is an English developmental biologist. He is best known for his pioneering research in nuclear transplantation and cloning. He was awarded the Lasker Award in 2009. In 2012, he and Shinya Yamanaka were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for the discovery that mature cells can be converted to stem cells.

Anthony Pawson British-Canadian scientist

Anthony "Tony" James Pawson,, was a British-born Canadian scientist whose research has revolutionised the understanding of signal transduction, the molecular mechanisms by which cells respond to external cues, and how they communicate with each other. He identified the phosphotyrosine-binding Src homology 2 as the prototypic non-catalytic interaction module. SH2 domains serve as a model for a large family of protein modules that act together to control many aspects of cellular signalling. Since the discovery of SH2 domains, hundreds of different modules have been identified in many proteins.

Gregory Winter British biochemist, Nobel laureate

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Sir Salvador Moncada, FRS, FRCP, FMedSci is a Honduran-British pharmacologist and professor. He is currently Research Domain Director for Cancer at the University of Manchester.

Michael Samuel Neuberger FRS FMedSci was a British biochemist and immunologist.

Aziz Sancar Turkish scientist, professor in Biochemistry

Aziz Sancar is a Turkish-American biochemist and molecular biologist specializing in DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and circadian clock. In 2015, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Tomas Lindahl and Paul L. Modrich for their mechanistic studies of DNA repair. He has made contributions on photolyase and nucleotide excision repair in bacteria that have changed his field.

Richard Henderson (biologist) Nobel prize winning British biochemist

Richard Henderson, CH, FRS, FMedSci, HonFRSC is a Scottish molecular biologist and biophysicist and pioneer in the field of electron microscopy of biological molecules. Henderson shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2017 with Jacques Dubochet and Joachim Frank.

London Research Institute

The Cancer Research UK London Research Institute (LRI) was a biological research facility which conducted research into the basic biology of cancer.

Richard D. Wood is an American molecular biologist specializing in research on DNA repair and mutation. He is known for pioneering studies on nucleotide excision repair (NER), particularly for reconstituting the minimum set of proteins involved in this process, identifying proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as part of the NER complex and identifying mammalian repair polymerases.

Paul L. Modrich american biochemist

Paul Lawrence Modrich is an American biochemist, James B. Duke Professor of Biochemistry at Duke University and Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is known for his research on DNA mismatch repair. Modrich received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015, jointly with Aziz Sancar and Tomas Lindahl.

Guy Dodson British crystallographer

(George) Guy Dodson FRS FMedSci, was a biochemist who specialised in protein crystallography at the University of York.

Sir Bruce Anthony John Ponder FMedSci FRS is an English geneticist and cancer researcher. He is Emeritus Professor of Oncology at the University of Cambridge and former director of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute.

Shankar Balasubramanian British chemist

Sir Shankar Balasubramanian is an Indian-born British chemist and Herchel Smith Professor of Medicinal Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry the University of Cambridge, Senior Group Leader at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. He is recognised for his contributions in the field of nucleic acids. He is scientific founder of Solexa and Cambridge Epigenetix.

Gideon Davies Professor of Chemistry

Gideon John Davies FRS FRSC FMedSci is a Royal Society Ken Murray Research Professor in the York Structural Biology Laboratory (YSBL) at the University of York, in the UK.

Patrik Rorsman Professor of Diabetic Medicine at the University of Oxford

Patrik Rorsman FRS FMedSci is Professor of Diabetic Medicine at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism (OCDEM), in the Radcliffe Department of Medicine at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Harris Manchester College, Oxford.

Ketan J. Patel Staff scientist, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

Ketan Jayakrishna Patel is a scientist and tenured principal investigator at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB).

William Charles Earnshaw FRS FRSE FMedSci is Professor of Chromosome Dynamics at the University of Edinburgh where he has been a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow since 1996.

Richard Marais Director of the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute and Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Manchester

Richard Malcolm Marais is Director of the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Manchester Institute and Professor of Molecular Oncology at the University of Manchester.

References

  1. 1 2 LINDAHL, Tomas Robert. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2015 (online Oxford University Press ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Closed Access logo alternative.svg (subscription required)
  2. 1 2 "Tomas Lindahl EMBO profile". people.embo.org. Heidelberg: European Molecular Biology Organization.
  3. 1 2 3 "Lindahl, Tomas Robert: EC/1988/20". London: The Royal Society. Archived from the original on 2014-11-21.
  4. 1 2 Anon (1988). "Dr Tomas Lindahl FMedSci FRS". royalsociety.org. London: Royal Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-22. One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from the royalsociety.org website where:
    “All text published under the heading 'Biography' on Fellow profile pages is available under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.” --Royal Society Terms, conditions and policies at the Wayback Machine (archived September 25, 2015)
  5. 1 2 "Dr Tomas Lindahl FRS FMedSci". London: Academy of Medical Sciences. Archived from the original on 2015-10-08.
  6. Lindahl, Tomas (2013). "My Journey to DNA Repair". Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics. 11 (1): 2–7. doi:10.1016/j.gpb.2012.12.001. ISSN   1672-0229.
  7. "Emeritus Scientist - Tomas Lindahl". The Crick. Archived from the original on 2015-12-01.
  8. Tomas Lindahl - Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 on Vimeo
  9. 1 2 Broad, William J. (2015-10-07). "Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for DNA Studies". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2015-10-07.
  10. Staff (7 October 2015). "THE NOBEL PRIZE IN CHEMISTRY 2015 – DNA repair – providing chemical stability for life" (PDF). Nobel Prize . Retrieved 2015-10-07.
  11. Cressey, Daniel (2015). "DNA repair sleuths win chemistry Nobel: Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar share 2015 prize". Nature. 526 (7573): 307–8. doi:10.1038/nature.2015.18515. ISSN   1476-4687. PMID   26469021.
  12. Sweden, Indexed Birth Records, 1860–1941
  13. Lindahl, Tomas (1967). On the structure and stability of nucleic acids in solution. Stockholm.
  14. 1 2 "Cancer Research UK Grants & Research – Tomas Lindahl" . Retrieved 2008-11-10.
  15. "4 ways that Tomas Lindahl’s Nobel Prize for Chemistry revolutionised cancer research", by Emma Smith, CRUK Science blog, 7 October 2015
  16. Gerken, T. is; Girard, C. A.; Tung, Y. -C. L.; Webby, C. J.; Saudek, V.; Hewitson, K. S.; Yeo, G. S. H.; McDonough, M. A.; Cunliffe, S.; McNeill, L. A.; Galvanovskis, J.; Rorsman, P.; Robins, P.; Prieur, X.; Coll, A. P.; Ma, M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Farooqi, I. S.; Sedgwick, B.; Barroso, I.; Lindahl, T.; Ponting, C. P.; Ashcroft, F. M.; O'Rahilly, S.; Schofield, C. J. (2008). "The Obesity-Associated FTO Gene Encodes a 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Nucleic Acid Demethylase". Science. 318 (5855): 1469–1472. doi:10.1126/science.1151710. PMC   2668859 . PMID   17991826.
  17. Tomas Lindahl's publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database. (subscription required)
  18. Lindahl, T. (1993). "Instability and decay of the primary structure of DNA". Nature. 362 (6422): 709–15. doi:10.1038/362709a0. PMID   8469282.
  19. Wood, R. D. (2001). "Human DNA Repair Genes". Science. 291 (5507): 1284–9. doi:10.1126/science.1056154. PMID   11181991.
  20. Satoh, M. S.; Lindahl, T. (1992). "Role of poly(ADP-ribose) formation in DNA repair". Nature. 356 (6367): 356. doi:10.1038/356356a0. PMID   1549180.
  21. Trewick, S. C.; Henshaw, T. F.; Hausinger, R. P.; Lindahl, T; Sedgwick, B (2002). "Oxidative demethylation by Escherichia coli AlkB directly reverts DNA base damage". Nature. 419 (6903): 174–8. doi:10.1038/nature00908. PMID   12226667.
  22. Barnes, D. E.; Lindahl, T (2004). "Repair and genetic consequences of endogenous DNA base damage in mammalian cells". Annual Review of Genetics. 38: 445–76. doi:10.1146/annurev.genet.38.072902.092448. PMID   15568983.
  23. Yang, Y. G.; Lindahl, T; Barnes, D. E. (2007). "Trex1 exonuclease degrades ssDNA to prevent chronic checkpoint activation and autoimmune disease". Cell. 131 (5): 873–86. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2007.10.017. PMID   18045533.
  24. Crow, Y. J.; Hayward, B. E.; Parmar, R; Robins, P; Leitch, A; Ali, M; Black, D. N.; Van Bokhoven, H; Brunner, H. G.; Hamel, B. C.; Corry, P. C.; Cowan, F. M.; Frints, S. G.; Klepper, J; Livingston, J. H.; Lynch, S. A.; Massey, R. F.; Meritet, J. F.; Michaud, J. L.; Ponsot, G; Voit, T; Lebon, P; Bonthron, D. T.; Jackson, A. P.; Barnes, D. E.; Lindahl, T (2006). "Mutations in the gene encoding the 3'-5' DNA exonuclease TREX1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome at the AGS1 locus". Nature Genetics. 38 (8): 917–20. doi:10.1038/ng1845. PMID   16845398.
  25. "Royal recent winners" . Retrieved 2008-11-10.
  26. "Gruppe 6: Cellebiologi og molekylærbiologi" (in Norwegian). Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters . Retrieved 2010-10-07.
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