John Monte

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John Monte is the bassist for Evan Seinfeld's new band, The Spyderz. He was a bassist for M.O.D., Mind Funk, [1] Ministry, Human Waste Project and a guitarist for Dragpipe and Handful Of Dust. John can often be seen at Lakeland Baseball Academy in Lakeland, Florida.

Evan Seinfeld American actor and musician

Evan Seinfeld is an American musician and actor, as well as a director, photographer, and writer. He is best known as the former lead vocalist, bassist, and founding member of Biohazard. Since leaving the band in May 2011 for personal reasons, he has joined the band Attika7 as a vocalist. He is currently married to DJ, producer, and former pornographic actress Lupe Fuentes.

M.O.D. is a crossover thrash band from New York City, fronted by Stormtroopers of Death vocalist Billy Milano. The band has been around for 33 years, and released eight studio albums. With M.O.D., Milano sought to continue on the musical path of the bands Anthrax, Stormtroopers of Death and Nuclear Assault, mixing shades of hardcore punk with thrash metal and often humorous and politically incorrect lyrics.

Mind Funk band

Mind Funk were an American rock band containing members of Chemical Waste and several other bands. The band was originally known as "Mind Fuck" but were forced by Epic Records to change their name. They signed to the Sony/Epic-label and released their self-titled debut album in 1991. Guitarist Jason Everman, known for stints on guitar and bass with Nirvana and Soundgarden, joined and later left in September 1994 to join the US Army 2nd Ranger Battalion and the Special Forces. Louis Svitek went on to later perform with Ministry and has since opened his new recording studio and label, Wu-Li Records. John Monte also later performed with Ministry.

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References

  1. Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Biography: Mind Funk". AMG . Retrieved 19 May 2010.