John Monte

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John Monte is the bassist for Evan Seinfeld's new band, The Spyderz. He was a bassist for M.O.D., Mind Funk, [1] Ministry, Human Waste Project and a guitarist for Dragpipe, Handful of Dust and Evil Mothers.

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References

  1. Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Biography: Mind Funk". AMG . Retrieved 19 May 2010.