List of FIFA Women's World Cup broadcasters

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The FIFA Women's World Cup (WWC) was first broadcast on television in 1991 and now ranks in the top five for most watched sporting broadcasts in the world. Below is a list of the stations/companies that air the WWC for their respective countries. This page was created in 2015 and contains the information for the 2011 & 2015 tournaments and onward, except in cases where previous information on broadcasters can be found.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is an organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and eFootball. FIFA is responsible for the organization of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

Contents

Africa

Algeria

beIN Media Group Qatari sport and entertainment network

beIN Media Group is an independent global sport and entertainment network founded on 1 January 2014, headquartered in Doha, Qatar. beIN distributes entertainment, live sport action, and major international events across 5 continents, in 43 countries, and in 7 different languages spanning Europe, North America, Asia, Australia and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

Eurosport is a pan-European television sports network, owned and operated by Discovery, Inc. Discovery took a 20% minority interest share in December 2012, and became the majority shareholder in the Eurosport venture with TF1 in January 2014, taking a 51% share of the company. On 22 July 2015 Discovery agreed to acquire TF1's remaining 49% stake in the venture.

Angola

Benin

Botswana

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cameroon

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Comoros

Congo Brazzaville

Cote d'Ivorie

Democratic Republic of Congo

Djibouti

Ecuatorial Guinea

Egypt

Eritrea

Ethiopia

Gabon

Gambia

Ghana

Guinea Bissau

Guinea Conakry

Kenya

African Union of Broadcasting

African Union of Broadcasting is a professional body composed of the national radio and television organizations of African states. The organization is committed to the development of all aspects of broadcasting in Africa including the exchange of indigenous programming. It is headquartered in Dakar, Senegal.

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Madagascar

Malawi

Mali

Mauritania

Mauritius

Morocco

Mozambique

Namibia

Niger

Nigeria

Rwanda

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Somalia

South Africa

Sudan

Swaziland

Tanzania

Togo

Tunisia

Uganda

Zambia

Zanzibar

Zimbabwe

Asia

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Bhutan

Brunei

Cambodia

Hong Kong

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Japan

Jordan

Korea DPR

Laos

Kuwait

Lebanon

Malaysia

Maldives

Myanmar

Nepal

Oman

Pakistan

Palestine

People's Republic of China

Qatar

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

South Korea

Sri Lanka

Syria

Taipei

Thailand

Timor Leste

United Arab Emirates

Vietnam

Yemen

Oceania

Australia

YearNetwork Play-by-play Color commentator Team ReporterStudio hostStudio analyst(s)
2015 SBS [1] David Basheer Heather Garriock Vitor Sobral Lucy Zelic Sally Shipard and Joanne Peters

Cook Islands

Federated State of Micronesia

Fiji

Kiribati

Nauru

New Zealand

Niue

Palau

Papua New Guinea

Samoa

Solomon Islands

Tonga

Tuvalu

Vanuatu

Europe

Albania

Andorra

Armenia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Belarus

Belgium

Bosnia-Herzegovnia

Bulgaria

Channel Islands

Croatia

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Faroe Islands

Finland

France

FYR Macedonia

Georgia

Germany

Greece

Greenland

Hungary

Iceland

Ireland

Isle of Man

Israel

Italy

Kazakhstan

Kosovo

Latvia

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Malta

Moldova

Monaco

Montenegro

Netherlands

Norway

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Russia

San Marino

Serbia

Slovakia

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

Ukraine

Vatican City

United Kingdom

YearChannel Play-by-play Color commentator(s)Studio HostStudio Analyst(s)
2015 [2] BBC Jonathan Pearce
Steve Bower
Sue Smith
Lucy Ward
Jacqui Oatley Rachel Yankey
Rachel Brown-Finnis
2011 [3] [4] Guy Mowbray Lucy Ward Gabby Logan Martin Keown
Jo Potter
2007 [5] Guy Mowbray Lucy Ward Gabby Logan Gavin Peacock
Karen Walker

North America

Canada

YearNetwork Play-by-play Color commentator(s)Studio HostStudio Analysts
2015 Sportsnet
CBC
Luke Wileman Jason deVos Ron MacLean and Cassie Campbell Christine Latham and Kelly Smith
Notes

Mexico

United States

English-language television

Finals
YearNetwork Play-by-play Color commentators Sideline ReporterStudio hostStudio analyst(s)
2023 FOX
2019 JP Dellacamera Aly Wagner
2015 JP Dellacamera Cat Whitehill and Tony DiCicco Jenny Taft Rob Stone and Kate Abdo Alexi Lalas, Kelly Smith, Heather Mitts, Ariane Hingst, and Eric Wynalda
2011 ESPN Ian Darke Julie Foudy Bob Ley and Rebecca Lowe Brandi Chastain, Brianna Scurry, Mia Hamm, and Tony DiCicco
2007 ESPN JP Dellacamera Rob Stone Heather Mitts
2003 ABC JP Dellacamera Wendy Gebauer and Tony DiCicco Tisha Venturini Terry Gannon Heather Mitts
1999 Wendy Gebauer Chris McKendry Robin Roberts
1991 SportsChannel America Randy Hahn Rick Davis

Other rounds

YearNetwork Play-by-play Color commentator(s)Sideline ReporterStudio hostStudio analyst(s)
2023 FOX
FS1
FS2
2019 JP Dellacamera Aly Wagner
2015 JP Dellacamera
Justin Kutcher
Jenn Hildreth
John Strong
Glenn Davis
Cat Whitehill and Tony DiCicco
Aly Wagner
Kyndra de St. Aubin
Danielle Slaton
Christine Latham
Angela Hucles
Jenny Taft
Julie Stewart-Binks
Grant Wahl
Rob Stone
Kate Abdo
Alexi Lalas
Angela Hucles
Mónica González
Ariane Hingst
Stuart Holden
Christine Latham
Heather Mitts
Leslie Osborne
Kelly Smith
Eric Wynalda
Dr. Joe Machnik (rules analyst)
2011 ESPN
ESPN2
Ian Darke
Adrian Healey
Beth Mowins
Julie Foudy
Kate Markgraf
Tony DiCicco
Cat Whitehill
Bob Ley
Rebecca Lowe
Julie Foudy, Brandi Chastain, Brianna Scurry, Mónica González, Alicia Ferguson, Viola Odebrecht, Mia Hamm, and Tony DiCicco
2007 JP Dellacamera
Adrian Healey
Julie Foudy
Tony DiCicco
Lori Walker
Rob Stone Heather Mitts
2003 ABC
ESPN
ESPN2
JP Dellacamera
Beth Mowins
Erica Herskowitz
Wendy Gebauer
Tony DiCicco
Tom Stone
Tisha Venturini Rob Stone and Terry Gannon Heather Mitts
1999 [6] JP Dellacamera
Bob Ley
Derek Rae
Holly Rowe
Wendy Gebauer
Amy Allman
Seamus Malin
Ty Keough
Chris McKendry Rob Stone and Robin Roberts
Notes
  • ESPN broadcast all matches for the 1999 Women's World Cup, but ESPN cut it back from 32 to 18 for 2003 due to conflicts with college football and the NFL.
  • 1999 featured the highest rated Women's Soccer match with the US/ China match until 2015. 11.4% of the nation's televisions tuned into the match. [7]
  • 2007 was the first Women's World Cup streamed online. All 32 matches were streamed on the fairly new ESPN 360, but games were not archived. 2007 is also the only year games were produced in studio. ESPN produced all the opening round matches in studio and didn't send their own broadcast team to China until the quarterfinals.
  • 2011 became the first Women's World Cup to have games archived on ESPN3.
  • 2015 became the first Women's World Cup to have the English World Feed available in the US. Fox used the English World Feed for their archive on the FOX Sports 2Go. 2015 also streamed games on FOX Sports Go.
  • The USA/Japan 2015 Final became the highest ever rated soccer match in the US. 84.1% of the nation tuned into the match on Fox. An average 25.4 million viewers watched the entire match, with 30.9 viewers catching the final 15 minutes of the match. Spanish network Telemundo, drew another 1.27 million viewers to boost the overall viewership to 26.7 million. [8]

Spanish-language television

YearNetwork Play-by-play Color commentator(s)
2023 Telemundo
NBC Universo
NBC Deportes
2019
2015 [9] Andrés Cantor
Sammy Sadovnik
Copán Álvarez
Carlos Yustis
Manuel Sol
Carlos Hermosillo
Frederik Oldenburg
2011 Univision
Galavision
Telefutura
2007
2003
1999

English World Feed

YearSite Play-by-play
2015 Edmonton
Ottawa & Montreal
Winnipeg
Vancouver
MoNcton
Mark Tompkins
Martin Fisher
Kevin Keatings
John Roder
Dave Woods
2011 Sinsheim & Dresden
Berlin & Augsburg
Bochum & Monchengladbach
Wolfsburg & Leverkusen
Gary Bloom
John Helm
John Roder
Steve Banyard

South/Central America and American Island Nations

America Samoa

Anguilla

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Aruba

Bahamas

Barbados

Belize

Bermuda

Bonaire

Brazil

British Virgin Islands

Cayman Islands

Chile

Colombia

Costa Rica

Cuba

Curacao

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

El Salvador

Granada

Guam

Guatemala

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Jamaica

Montserrat

Nicaragua

Panama

Paraguay

Perú

Puerto Rico

St. Kitts and Nevis

St. Lucia

St. Vincent

Suriname

Trinidad and Tobago

Turks and Caicos Islands

Uruguay

US Virgin Islands

Venezuela

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References

  1. "SBS is pleased to announce that for the first time in Australian TV history it will be broadcasting the entire 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Canada, live, free and exclusive – including all Matildas matches". SBS. Retrieved 14 April 2015.
  2. "World Cup 2015: Women's Football live on the BBC". TV News Room. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  3. "Women's World Cup coverage returns to BBC". Sports Pro Media. Retrieved 23 May 2011.
  4. "BBC to follow Eng;and at the Women's World Cup". Digital Spy. Retrieved 20 May 2011.
  5. "BBC Sport – Fifa Women's World Cup Finals". Sports Pro Media. Retrieved 25 August 2007.
  6. "All 32 Games Will Be Televised". LA Times . Retrieved 16 June 1999.Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  7. "Women's World Cup gets whopping ESPN TV rating". USA Today . Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  8. "FIFA women's World Cup TV ratings for U.S. vs. Japan a smash hit". The Denver Post . Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  9. "NBC DEPORTES ANNOUNCES ROSTER OF ON-AIR TALENT FOR 2015 FIFA WORLD CUP EVENTS". NBC Universal Media Village. Retrieved 26 May 2015.