List of colleges and universities in Delaware

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Henry Belin duPont College Center at Wesley College

There are eight colleges and universities in Delaware. These institutions include two research universities, one master's university, one baccalaureate college, two associate's colleges, and two special-focus institutions. Five of Delaware's post-secondary institutions are private and three are public.

Delaware State of the United States of America

Delaware is one of the 50 states of the United States, in the South-Atlantic or Southern region. It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, north by Pennsylvania, and east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.

Contents

Delaware's oldest post-secondary institution is the University of Delaware, which was chartered by the Delaware General Assembly as a degree-granting college in 1833. [note 1] The University of Delaware is also the state's largest institution of higher learning in terms of enrollment, as it had 23,009 students as of late 2014. [3] According to the United States Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, the Delaware College of Art and Design is the state's smallest institution of higher learning with an enrollment of 170. [3] Wilmington University is Delaware's largest private post-secondary institution, with an enrollment of 15,316. [3]

University of Delaware American university

The University of Delaware is a public research university located in Newark, Delaware. University of Delaware is the largest university in Delaware. UD currently offers more than 135 undergraduate degrees. At the graduate level, it offers 67 doctoral, 142 master’s degree programs, 14 dual degrees, 15 interdisciplinary programs, 12 on-line programs, and 28 certificate programs across its seven colleges and more than 82 research centers and institutes. UD is one of the top 100 institutions for federal obligations in science and engineering and interdisciplinary initiatives in energy science and policy, the environment, and in human health. The main campus is in Newark, with satellite campuses in Dover, Wilmington, Lewes, and Georgetown. It is considered a large institution with approximately 18,500 undergraduate and 4,500 graduate students. UD is a privately governed university which receives public funding for being a land-grant, sea-grant, space-grant and urban-grant state-supported research institution.

Delaware General Assembly

The Delaware General Assembly is the legislature of the U.S. state of Delaware. It is a bicameral legislature composed of the Delaware Senate with 21 senators and the Delaware House of Representatives with 41 representatives. It meets at Legislative Hall in Dover, Delaware, convening on the second Tuesday of January of odd-numbered years, with a second session of the same Assembly convening likewise in even-numbered years. Normally the sessions are required to adjourn by the last day of June of the same calendar year. However the Governor can call a special session of the legislature at any time.

United States Department of Education United States government department

The United States Department of Education, also referred to as the ED for (the) Education Department, is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. It began operating on May 4, 1980, having been created after the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was split into the Department of Education and the Department of Health and Human Services by the Department of Education Organization Act, which President Jimmy Carter signed into law on October 17, 1979.

Delaware has two land-grant universities: Delaware State University and the University of Delaware. [4] The University of Delaware is also the state's sole participant in the National Sea Grant College Program and the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. [5] [6] In addition, Delaware State University is the one historically black college and university in the state, and is a member of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. [7] [8] Delaware previously had two private post-secondary institutions for men and women respectively: St. Mary's College and Wesleyan Female College respectively. [9] [10]

Land-grant university institution of higher education in the United States designated by a state to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890

A land-grant university is an institution of higher education in the United States designated by a state to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890.

Delaware State University American public university

Delaware State University, is a public historically black university in Dover, Delaware. DSU also has two satellite campuses, one in Wilmington and one in Georgetown. The university encompasses four colleges and a diverse population of undergraduate and advanced-degree students.

National Sea Grant College Program organization

The National Sea Grant College Program is a program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce. It is a national network of 33 Sea Grant Colleges and universities involved in scientific research, education, training, and extension projects geared toward the conservation and practical use of the coasts, Great Lakes, and other marine areas. The program is administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is based in Silver Spring, Maryland. No sea rights have actually been granted, only money.

The state does not have a medical school, but the Delaware Institute of Medical Education and Research reserves spaces for Delaware students at two medical schools in Philadelphia. [11] Delaware has one law school, Widener University Delaware Law School. [12] All eight of Delaware's post-secondary institutions are regionally accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. [13]

A medical school is a tertiary educational institution, or part of such an institution, that teaches medicine, and awards a professional degree for physicians and surgeons. Such medical degrees include the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, Doctor of Medicine (MD), or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). Many medical schools offer additional degrees, such as a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D), Master's degree (M.Sc), a physician assistant program, or other post-secondary education.

Philadelphia Largest city in Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2018 census-estimated population of 1,584,138. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

Regional accreditation aspect of university accreditation in the U.S.A.

Regional accreditation is the educational accreditation of schools, colleges, and universities in the United States by one of seven regional accrediting agencies. Accreditation is a voluntary process by which colleges demonstrate to each other, and sometimes to employers and licensing agencies, that their credits and degrees meet minimum standards. It is the self-regulation of the higher education industry.

Institutions

List of colleges and universities in Delaware
SchoolLocationControlType [note 2] Enrollment [3]
(Late 2016)
Founded
Delaware College of Art and Design Wilmington Private Associate's college 1701997 [15]
Delaware State University Dover Public Master's university 4,3281891 [16]
Delaware Technical Community College Dover, Georgetown, Newark, and Wilmington Public Associate's college 14,4791967 [17]
Goldey–Beacom College Pike Creek Valley Private Special-focus institution 2,0631886 [18]
University of Delaware Newark Public Research university 23,0091833 [note 1]
Wesley College Dover Private Baccalaureate college 1,4731873 [19]
Widener University Delaware Law School Wilmington Private Special-focus institution 403 [20] 1975 [21]
Wilmington University New Castle Private Research university 15,3161968 [22]

Defunct institutions

List of defunct colleges and universities in Delaware
SchoolLocationControlFoundedClosedNotes
Brandywine Junior College Wilmington [23] Private [23] 1966 [23] 1991 [23] Entered into a merger with Widener University in 1976 and graduated its final class in 1991. Campus now serves as Widener University Delaware Law School. [23]
St. Mary's College Wilmington [9] Private [9] 1841 [9] 1866 [9] Catholic institution closed in 1866 following the American Civil War. [24]
Wesleyan Female College Wilmington [10] Private [10] 1837 [10] 1885 [10] Methodist institution for women. Following its closing, no college for women existed in Delaware until the Women's College of Delaware opened in 1914. [25]
Women's College of DelawareNewark [26] Public [26] 1914 [26] 1945 [26] Merged into the University of Delaware in 1945. [26]

See also

Higher education in the United States education beyond high school

Higher education in the United States is an optional stage of formal learning following secondary education. Higher education, also referred to as post-secondary education, third-stage, third-level, or tertiary education occurs most commonly at one of the 4,360 Title IV degree-granting institutions, either colleges or universities in the country. These may be public universities, private universities, liberal arts colleges, community colleges, or for-profit colleges. US higher education is loosely regulated by a number of third-party organizations varying in quality.

Below are links to lists of institutions of higher education in the United States by state, grouped by Census Region, as well as lists of institutions in United States insular areas and of American institutions located outside the United States and its territories.

Related Research Articles

College educational institution

A college is an educational institution or a constituent part of one. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, a part of a collegiate or federal university, an institution offering vocational education or a secondary school.

Delaware Valley Metropolitan area in the United States

The Delaware Valley is the valley through which the Delaware River flows. By extension, this toponym is commonly used to refer to Greater Philadelphia or Philadelphia metropolitan area, which straddles the Lower Delaware River just north of its estuary. The Delaware Valley Metropolitan Area is located at the southern part of the Northeast megalopolis and as such, the Delaware Valley can be described as either a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), or as a broader combined statistical area (CSA). The Delaware Valley Metropolitan Area is composed of several counties in southeastern Pennsylvania and southwestern New Jersey, one county in northern Delaware, and one county in northeastern Maryland. The MSA has a population of over 6 million, while the CSA has a population of over 7.1 million. Philadelphia, being the region's major commercial, cultural, and industrial center, wields a rather large sphere of influence that affects the counties that immediately surround it.

Texas Southern University university

Texas Southern University is a public historically black university (HBCU) in Houston, Texas. The university was established in 1927 as the Houston Colored Junior College. It developed through its private college phase as the four-year Houston Colored College. On March 3, 1947, the state declared this to be the first state university in Houston; it was renamed Texas State University for Negroes. In 1951, the name changed to Texas Southern University.

Ohio Wesleyan University

Ohio Wesleyan University (OWU) is a private liberal arts university in Delaware, Ohio. It was founded in 1842 by Methodist leaders and Central Ohio residents as a nonsectarian institution, and is a member of the Ohio Five – a consortium of Ohio liberal arts colleges. Ohio Wesleyan has always admitted students irrespective of religion or race and maintained that the university "is forever to be conducted on the most liberal principles."

Widener University

Widener University is a private university in Chester, Pennsylvania. The university has three other campuses: two in Pennsylvania and one in Wilmington, Delaware.

Salesianum School

Salesianum School is a Roman Catholic independent school for boys, located in Wilmington, Delaware. It is run independently within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wilmington and is operated by the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales. The current enrollment is about 1,100 students, from Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Salesianum has established a close connection with Lycée Saint Michel, another Oblate high school, located in Annecy, France. Salesianum was named one of the Top 50 Catholic High Schools in America by the Catholic Honor Roll in 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010.

Higher Learning Commission university accreditation organization in the U.S.A.

The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) is an organization tasked with the regional accreditation responsibilities for post-secondary education institutions in the central United States. The Higher Learning Commission oversees the accreditation of degree-granting colleges and universities in nineteen mostly Midwestern and South-Central states, namely Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The headquarters of the organization is based in Chicago, Illinois.

Wilmington University New Castle, Delaware

Wilmington University is a private, non-profit, doctoral research institution with its main campus located in New Castle, Delaware, United States.

Savannah State University

Savannah State University is a public historically black university in Savannah, Georgia. It is the oldest public historically black university in the state. The university is a member-school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

References

Explanatory notes

  1. 1 2 The University of Delaware is a successor institution to the "Free School," which was founded in 1743. The University of Delaware was chartered as Delaware College by the Delaware General Assembly as a degree-granting college in 1833. [1] [2]
  2. School location, control, and type are based on the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. [14]

Citations

  1. "UD History". University of Delaware. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  2. "Delaware Public Archives: University of Delaware". Delaware Public Archives. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "College Navigator". United States Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  4. "Map of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities" (PDF). United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 8, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  5. "Sea Grant Delaware: About Us". Sea Grant Delaware. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  6. "Delaware Space Grant Consortium". Delaware Space Grant Consortium. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  7. "White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities". United States Department of Education. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  8. "Thurgood Marshall College Fund: Member Schools". Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 "Patrick Reilly papers, 1828-1878 (MC 42)". Philadelphia Archdiocesan Historical Research Center. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 Taggart, Robert J. (November 30, 2007). "Wesleyan Female College of Wilmington, Delaware: A College Before its Time?". American Educational History Journal. 35 (2): 221–232. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  11. "Delaware Institute of Medical Education and Research". Delaware Health Care Commission. Archived from the original on December 31, 2016. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  12. "Delaware's Law School". Widener University. Archived from the original on June 6, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  13. "Institution Directory". Middle States Commission on Higher Education. Archived from the original on August 26, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  14. "Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education: Institution Lookup". Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Archived from the original on October 6, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  15. "Delaware College of Art and Design: Overview". Delaware College of Art and Design. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  16. "About DSU". Delaware State University. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  17. "History". Delaware Technical Community College. June 3, 2011. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  18. "College History". Goldey–Beacom College. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  19. "About Wesley College". Wesley College. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  20. "2016 Standard 509 Information Report" (PDF). Delaware Law School. 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 5, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.
  21. "Vision & History". Widener University. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  22. "Wilmington University at a Glance". Wilmington University. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  23. 1 2 3 4 5 Williams, Khalil. "Widener Archives Features Brandywine College". Widener Magazine. Widener University. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  24. "Delaware". Catholic Encyclopedia . New Advent. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  25. Taggart, Robert J. (November 30, 2007). "Wesleyan Female College of Wilmington, Delaware: A College Before its Time?". American Educational History Journal. 35 (2): 221–232. Archived from the original on October 5, 2015. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  26. 1 2 3 4 5 Manser, Ann (October 7, 2014). "Women's College centennial" (Press release). University of Delaware. Archived from the original on March 12, 2017. Retrieved August 31, 2017.