List of volcanoes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

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This is a list of active and extinct volcanoes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Volcanoes

NameElevationLocationLast eruption
metersfeet Coordinates
May-Ya-Moto 2000- 0°56′S29°20′E / 0.93°S 29.33°E / -0.93; 29.33 (1)
Nyamuragira 305810,033 1°24′29″S29°12′00″E / 1.408°S 29.20°E / -1.408; 29.20 2011
Mount Nyiragongo 347011,384 1°31′S29°15′E / 1.52°S 29.25°E / -1.52; 29.25 2021 (continuing)
Tshibinda 14604790 2°19′S28°45′E / 2.32°S 28.75°E / -2.32; 28.75 Holocene
Bisoke 371112,175 1°28′12″S29°29′31″E / 1.47°S 29.492°E / -1.47; 29.492 1957

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Subglacial volcano

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References