Pro40

Last updated

Pro40
CountriesFlag of England.svg  England
Administrator England and Wales Cricket Board
Format Limited overs cricket
First edition1969
Latest edition2009
Number of teams18 (2 leagues of 9)
Current champion Sussex
Most successful Essex, Kent, Lancashire (5 titles each)
Website ECB Natwest Pro40 website

The NatWest Pro40 League was a one-day cricket league for first-class cricket counties in England and Wales. It was inaugurated in 1999, but was essentially the old Sunday League retitled to reflect the fact that large numbers of matches were played on days other than Sunday.

Contents

Sunday League

The Sunday League was launched in 1969, as the second one-day competition in England and Wales alongside the Gillette Cup (launched in 1963). Sponsored by John Player & Sons, the league was called John Player's County League (1969), the John Player League (1970–83), then the John Player Special League (1984–86). The 17 counties of the time played each other in a league format on Sunday afternoons throughout the season. These matches were concise enough to be shown on television, with BBC2 broadcasting one match each week in full until 1980, and then as part of the Sunday Grandstand multi-sport programme. For close finishes for the title, cameras appeared at the grounds where the contenders for the title were competing and the trophy presentation to the victorious team would be on film.

Refuge Assurance replaced John Player Special as the sponsor of the competition, called the Refuge Assurance League, in 1987. In 1988 they introduced an end-of-season play-off competition known as the Refuge Assurance Cup. The top four teams of the league season qualified for this competition, with the first-placed team playing the fourth and the second-placed team playing the third, and the winners of these matches meeting in a final at a neutral venue. This competition lasted until 1991.

On Friday 5 July 1991, Somerset played Lancashire at Taunton in the first Sunday League match not to be played on a Sunday. [1]

The Sunday League was not sponsored in 1992 (Durham making its debut in the competition this season), but in 1993 AXA Equity and Law became the sponsor. The matches this season were 50 overs per innings. The first round of matches that took place on 9 May 1993 were the first official matches in England to be played in coloured clothing and with a white ball. The following season the competition reverted to 40 overs per innings. On Wednesday 23 July 1997 Warwickshire played Somerset at Edgbaston in the first competitive county game to be played under floodlights. [2]

National League

The National League was launched in 1999 with the 18 first-class counties split into two divisions with three teams promoted and relegated from each. The matches were played over 45 overs and the competition was sponsored by Norwich Union. Matches were spread over the week rather than Sundays only.

The counties incorporated nicknames into their official names for the National League, from 2002. For example, Kent became the 'Spitfires', Middlesex the 'Crusaders' and Lancashire were the 'Lightning'. The following season the Scotland Saltires took part in the League until 2005.

The C & G Trophy was restructured, in 2006, from a knock-out competition to a round-robin league format, which took up the early part of the season. The National League was renamed the 'NatWest Pro40' and was played in the later part of the season with the teams playing each other once. Also, two teams instead of three were promoted to the first division and two relegated to the second division. A third promotion/relegation spot was determined in a play-off game between the team third from top in the second division and third from bottom team in the first.

Replacement

In July 2009, the ECB unveiled plans for a revamped county structure involving three competitions, one of which would replace both the Pro40 and the Friends Provident Trophy. [3]

On 27 August 2009, this new competition was announced as a 40-overs-per-innings tournament, similar to the Pro40. The ECB 40, also known as the Clydesdale Bank 40 for sponsorship reasons, would serve as one of the three competitions in county cricket for the next four years, along with the County Championship and the Friends Provident t20. [4]

Teams

Division 1 teams in 2009:

Division 2 teams in 2009:

Results

National League

Season1st Division2nd Division
ChampionsRelegatedChampions(Also) Promoted
NatWest Pro40
2009 SussexNot applicableWarwickshireNot applicable
2008 SussexMiddlesex, LancashireEssexYorkshire
2007 WorcestershireWarwickshire, Essex, NorthamptonshireDurhamSomerset, Middlesex [5]
2006 EssexGlamorgan, Durham, MiddlesexGloucestershireWorcestershire, Hampshire [6]
totesport League
2005 EssexGloucestershire, Worcestershire, HampshireSussexDurham, Warwickshire
2004 GlamorganWarwickshire, Kent, SurreyMiddlesexWorcestershire, Nottinghamshire
National League
2003 SurreyLeicestershire, Yorkshire, WorcestershireLancashireNorthamptonshire, Hampshire
Norwich Union League
2002 GlamorganSomerset, Durham, NottinghamshireGloucestershireSurrey, Essex
2001 KentGloucestershire, Surrey, NorthamptonshireGlamorganDurham, Worcestershire
Norwich Union National League
2000 GloucestershireWorcestershire, Lancashire, SussexSurreyNottinghamshire, Warwickshire
CGU National League
1999 LancashireWarwickshire, Hampshire, EssexSussexSomerset, Northamptonshire

Sunday League

AXA League

1998 Lancashire

AXA Life League

1997 Warwickshire

AXA Equity & Law League

1996 Surrey
1995 Kent
1994 Warwickshire
1993 Glamorgan

Sunday League

1992 Middlesex
Refuge Assurance League |Refuge Assurance Cup
1991 Nottinghamshire 1991 Worcestershire
1990 Derbyshire 1990 Middlesex
1989 Lancashire 1989 Essex
1988 Worcestershire 1988 Lancashire
1987 Worcestershire

John Player Special League

1986 Hampshire
1985 Essex
1984 Essex

John Player League

1983 Yorkshire
1982 Sussex
1981 Essex
1980 Warwickshire
1979 Somerset
1978 Hampshire
1977 Leicestershire
1976 Kent
1975 Hampshire
1974 Leicestershire
1973 Kent
1972 Kent
1971 Worcestershire
1970 Lancashire

John Player's County League

1969 Lancashire

Tournaments won by county

Essex5
Kent5
Lancashire5
Worcestershire4
Glamorgan3
Hampshire3
Sussex3
Warwickshire3
Leicestershire2
Surrey2
Derbyshire1
Gloucestershire1
Middlesex1
Nottinghamshire1
Somerset1
Yorkshire1
Durham0
Northamptonshire0

See also

Notes

  1. Benson and Hedges Cricket Year September 1990 to September 1991 (p. 325)
  2. Warwickshire v Somerset July 1997 – Electronic Telegraph
  3. "Counties could scrap 50-over cricket". ESPNcricinfo. 29 July 2009. Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  4. "English game dumps 50-over cricket". ESPNcricinfo. 27 August 2009. Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  5. Middlesex beat Northamptonshire in Play-Off match
  6. Hampshire beat Glamorgan in Play-Off match

Official website

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