South American U-20 Women's Championship

Last updated
South American Under-20 Women's Football Championship
Sudamericano-Femenino-Sub20.png
Region CONMEBOL
Number of teams14
Current champions Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
(8th title)
Most successful club(s) Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
(8 titles)
Website Official website

The South American Under-20 Women's Football Championship (Spanish: Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino Sub-20) is an international association football competition for women's national teams. It is held every two years for South American players under the age of 20 and serves as a qualification tournament for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. In its inaugural year, 2004, it was played by U-19 players.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

The FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup is an international association football tournament, organized by FIFA, for national teams of women under the age of 20. The tournament is held in even-numbered years. It was first conducted in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship with an upper age limit of 19. In 2006, the age limit was raised to the current 20. The event was renamed as a World Cup effective with the 2008 competition, making its name consistent with FIFA's other worldwide competitions for national teams.

Contents

The last edition was held in 2018 in Ecuador. [1]

Results

YearHostFinalThird Place Match
ChampionScoreSecond PlaceThird PlaceScoreFourth Place
2004 [2]
details
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg
Paraguay
Flag of Ecuador.svg
Ecuador
Group stageFlag of Bolivia (state).svg
Bolivia
2006 [3]
details
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg
Paraguay
Group stageFlag of Peru (state).svg
Peru
2008 [4]
details
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg
Paraguay
Group stageFlag of Chile.svg
Chile
2010 [5]
details
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
2 – 0Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Flag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg
Paraguay
6 – 0Flag of Chile.svg
Chile
2012
details
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil [6] Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Group stageFlag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg
Paraguay
2014 [7]
details
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Paraguay.svg
Paraguay
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Group stageFlag of Bolivia (state).svg
Bolivia
2015
details
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Group stageFlag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
2018
details
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Group stageFlag of Paraguay.svg
Paraguay
Flag of Colombia.svg
Colombia
Group stageFlag of Venezuela (state).svg
Venezuela

Performances by countries

So far only Uruguay have not reached a top four position.

TeamTitlesRunners-upThird-placeFourth-place
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 8 (2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2018)
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 3 (2004, 2014, 2018)3 (2006, 2008, 2010)1 (2012)
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3 (2006, 2008, 2012)1 (2015)
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 1 (2010)4 (2012, 2014, 2015, 2018)
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela 1 (2015)1 (2018)
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 1 (2004)
Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 2 (2004, 2014)
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 2 (2008, 2010)
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 1 (2006)

Participating nations

Legend
Team Flag of Brazil.svg
2004
Flag of Chile.svg
2006
Flag of Brazil.svg
2008
Flag of Colombia.svg
2010
Flag of Brazil.svg
2012
Flag of Uruguay.svg
2014
Flag of Brazil.svg
2015
Flag of Ecuador.svg
2018
Total
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina GS2nd2ndGS2ndGS4thGS8
Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 4thGSGSGSGS4thGSGS8
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1st1st1st1st1st1st1st1st8
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile GSGS4th4thGSGSGSGS8
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia GSGSGS2nd3rd3rd3rd3rd8
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 3rdGSGSGSGSGSGSGS8
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 2nd3rd3rd3rd4th2ndGS2nd8
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru GS4thGSGSGSGSGSGS8
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay GSGSGSGSGSGSGSGS8
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela GSGSGSGSGSGS2nd4th8

Top scorers

The topscorers of the tournaments were:

YearPlayerGoals
2004 Flag of Bolivia.svg Palmira Loayza 6
2006 Flag of Brazil.svg Marta 14
2008 Flag of Brazil.svg Érika
Flag of Paraguay.svg Dulce Quintana
7
2010 Flag of Brazil.svg Alanna 7
2012 Flag of Brazil.svg Ketlen 9
2014 Flag of Brazil.svg Andressa 6
2015 Flag of Argentina.svg Yamila Rodríguez 6
2018 Flag of Brazil.svg Geyse da Silva 12

FIFA World Cup qualification and results

For the 2002 and 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship, South America was given one qualification spot. In 2002 Brazil and Peru played a two legged play-off for one spot allocated to South America. Brazil won 12–0 on aggregate. [8] Since 2006 South America has been given two spots for the now-renamed FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. In this tournament, Brazil has reached the third-place match three times and Colombia reached the third-place match in 2010. Argentina has been eliminated from the group stage for all three of their appearances; Paraguay and Chile were eliminated from the group stage in their only appearance.

2002 FIFA U-19 Womens World Championship

The 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 17 August to 1 September. It was the first sanctioned youth tournament for women put together by FIFA. The tournament was hosted by Canada. FIFA granted the tournament to Canada in March 2001. Three cities hosted the tournament, Edmonton, Vancouver, and Victoria. Canada's Christine Sinclair was the Adidas Golden Ball recipient, as tournament MVP, and the Golden Shoe winner.

The 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 10 to 27 November 2004. It was the second edition of the youth tournament for women put together by FIFA, before being renamed FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship for the 2006 edition. The tournament was hosted by Thailand, in two stadiums in Bangkok, one in Chiang Mai and another in Phuket. This was the first women's FIFA tournament held in Southeast Asia.

World Cup 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina GSGSGS
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 4th4th3rdQFGSGSGSQFGS
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 4th
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay GSGS
Flag of Venezuela (state).svg  Venezuela GS
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile GS

See also

The South American Under-17 Women's Football Championship is an international women's association football competition held every two years for South American under-17 women teams and serves as a qualification tournament for the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

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References

  1. "Paraguay, Chile, Ecuador y Argentina realizarán torneos sudamericanos femeninosorneos-sudamericanos-femeninos". conmebol.com. 25 April 2017. Retrieved 12 May 2017.
  2. "Women Under 19 World Cup 2004". RSSSF. Retrieved 24 May 2012.
  3. "South America - Under 19 Women's Qualifying Tournament 2006". RSSSF. Retrieved 24 May 2012.
  4. "Southamerican Women U-20 Championship 2008". RSSSF. Retrieved 24 May 2012.
  5. "Southamerican Women U-20 Championship 2010". RSSSF. Retrieved 24 May 2012.
  6. "Sudamericana: más cupos para 8 países" (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. La ciudad de Curitiba, estado de Paraná, en Brasil, será sede del mencionado torneo
  7. http://mundodelfutbolfemenino.blogspot.de/2012/06/uruguay-organizara-el-sudamericano.html
  8. http://www.rsssf.com/tabless/sam-wom-u19-02.html