Thomas W. Swinney House

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Thomas W. Swinney House

THOMAS W. SWINNEY HOUSE, FORT WAYNE, ALLEN COUNTY, IN.jpg

Thomas W. Swinney House
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Location 1424 W. Jefferson St., Fort Wayne, Indiana
Coordinates 41°4′24″N85°9′27″W / 41.07333°N 85.15750°W / 41.07333; -85.15750 Coordinates: 41°4′24″N85°9′27″W / 41.07333°N 85.15750°W / 41.07333; -85.15750
Area less than one acre
Built 1844 (1844)-1845, 1885
Architectural style Late Victorian, Eastlake porch
NRHP reference # 81000026 [1]
Added to NRHP April 27, 1981

Thomas W. Swinney House, also known as The Swinney Homestead, is a historic home located at Fort Wayne, Indiana. It was built in 1844-1845 as a 1 1/2-story brick and limestone structure. It was enlarged with a 2 1/2-story, square, Late Victorian style brick wing about 1885. It features an Eastlake Movement front porch. It was built by Thomas J. Swinney, a pioneer settler of Allen County and prominent Fort Wayne businessman. The house and land for Swinney Park were passed to the city of Fort Wayne in 1922. [2] :2–3

Fort Wayne, Indiana City in Indiana

Fort Wayne is a city in the U.S. state of Indiana and the seat of Allen County, United States. Located in northeastern Indiana, the city is 18 miles (29 km) west of the Ohio border and 50 miles (80 km) south of the Michigan border. With a population of 253,691 in the 2010 census, it is the second-most populous city in Indiana after Indianapolis, and the 75th-most populous city in the United States. It is the principal city of the Fort Wayne metropolitan area, consisting of Allen, Wells, and Whitley counties, a combined population of 419,453 as of 2011. Fort Wayne is the cultural and economic center of northeastern Indiana. The city is within a 300-mile radius of major population centers, including Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Detroit, Indianapolis, Louisville, Lexington, and Milwaukee. In addition to the three core counties, the combined statistical area (CSA) includes Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, Noble, and Steuben counties, with an estimated population of 615,077.

Limestone Sedimentary rocks made of calcium carbonate

Limestone is a carbonate sedimentary rock that is often composed of the skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, foraminifera, and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). A closely related rock is dolostone, which contains a high percentage of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2. In fact, in old USGS publications, dolostone was referred to as magnesian limestone, a term now reserved for magnesium-deficient dolostones or magnesium-rich limestones.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. [1] It is located in the Fort Wayne Park and Boulevard System Historic District.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Fort Wayne Park and Boulevard System Historic District

Fort Wayne Park and Boulevard System Historic District is a national historic district located at Fort Wayne, Indiana. The district encompasses 34 contributing buildings, 61 contributing sites, 70 contributing structures, and 15 contributing objects in 11 public parks, four parkways, and ten boulevards associated with the parkway and boulevard system in Fort Wayne. The system was originally conceived in 1909 by Charles Mulford Robinson (1869–1917) and further developed and refined by noted landscape architect and planner George Kessler (1862-1923) in 1911-1912. The buildings reflect Classical Revival and Bungalow / American Craftsman style architecture. Later additions and modifications include those by noted landscape architect Arthur Asahel Shurcliff.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2015-07-01.Note: This includes Raon Meitz; Bett McDermott; Lois Snouffer & Helen Robinson (n.d.). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas W. Swinney House" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-07-01. and Accompanying photographs.