Thomas Woodard, Jr. Farm

Last updated
Woodard, Thomas Jr., Farm
Nearest city Cedar Hill, Tennessee
Area 132.3 acres (53.5 ha)
Built 1838 (1838)
Architectural style Federal
MPS Historic Family Farms in Middle Tennessee MPS
NRHP reference # 08000315 [1]
Added to NRHP April 8, 2008

The Thomas Woodard, Jr. Farm is a historic farmhouse in Cedar Hill, Tennessee, U.S..

Cedar Hill, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Cedar Hill is a city in Robertson County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 314 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

The farmhouse was built circa 1838 for Thomas Woodard, Jr. of Woodard Hall, his wife Winnefred House Robertson, and their children. [2] Woodard owned distilled whiskey and grew tobacco. [2]

Woodard Hall is a historic mansion in Springfield, Tennessee, USA. It was built circa 1792, and significantly remodelled by Colonel Wilie Woodard in 1854. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since October 10, 1975.

Woodard owned slaves who worked on the farm. [2] By 1860, he owned 14. [2] After the American Civil War of 1861-1865, most of his former slaves, who took the last name Woodard, became tenant farmers. [2] Both slaves and tenant farmers were buried in a cemetery on the property. [2]

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

The farm remained in the Woodard family until 1921, when it continued to be used to grow tobacco. [2] It is now a horse farm. [2]

Architectural significance

The house was designed in the Federal architectural style. [2] It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since April 8, 2008. [3]

Federal architecture architectural style

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815. This style shares its name with its era, the Federalist Era. The name Federal style is also used in association with furniture design in the United States of the same time period. The style broadly corresponds to the classicism of Biedermeier style in the German-speaking lands, Regency architecture in Britain and to the French Empire style.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Thomas Woodard, Jr. Farm". National Park Service. United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  3. "Woodard, Thomas Jr., Farm". National Park Service. United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved March 4, 2018.